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Gapminer Project -Comparing Levels of Development- Ayaka
 
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BIBILIOGRAPHY: * Fedec, Anna. "Japan GDP Growth Rate 1980-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar | Forecast." Trading Economics. N.p., 18 Nov. 2014. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. * "GDP." InvestorWords. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. * "Hiroshima Japanese Flag." Flickr. Yahoo!, n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. "Usa Flag." Flickr. Yahoo!, 24 May 2008. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. * "What Is Population Growth? Definition and Meaning."BusinessDictionary.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2014. * Wiener, Joshua M., and Jane Tilly. "International Journal of Epidemiology."Oxford Journals. N.p., 31 Apr. 2002. Web. 25 Nov. 2014.
Views: 23 ayaka0330oneokrock
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ADVANCED RESEARCH IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
 
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International Journal of Advanced Research in Biological Sciences (IJARBS) ISSN:2348-8069 is inviting you to submit research paper for publishing in Forthcoming issues. 2015.
Views: 74 EDITOR IJCRCPS
Rapid Learning Health Systems  From Big Data to Decision Support
 
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Niels Peek (MSc, PhD) is Reader in Health Informatics at the Health e-Research Centre from the University of Manchester. He has a background in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence. His research focuses on data-driven informatics methods for healthcare quality improvement, data mining for healthcare, predictive models, and clinical computerised decision support. He has co-authored more than 100 peer-reviewed, scientific publications. Previously based at the University of Amsterdam, he led the “CARDSS” initiative which secured 1.7M euro funding and introduced computerised decision support in 40 Dutch hospitals. He co-organised international workshops on intelligent data analysis in biomedicine in Aberdeen (2005), Verona (2006) and Bled (2011), and a workshop on electronic phenotyping in Washington, DC (2014). In 2013, he acted as Scientific Programme Chair of the 14th Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Medicine (AIME 2013). Currently he chairs an international working group on “Data Mining and Big Data Analytics” from the International Medical Informatics Association and is the President of the European Society of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine. Building on the concept of rapid learning health systems, Dr. Peek’s seminar will focus on the use of health information technology to address epidemiological and public health questions and to accelerate the translation of research findings to clinical practice. https://globalhealthtrainingcentre.tghn.org/e-seminars-new/ www.theglobalhealthnetwork.org
Views: 578 infoTGHN
Parable of the Hummingbird: Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
 
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https://vimeo.com/heartspeakproductions Featured Presentation at the 2nd International Conference on Restorative Practices: Widening Our Lens, Connecting Our Practice, May 31st - June 5th, 2009, Vancouver, BC. Restorative Practices International in partnership with the Centre for Restorative Justice, SFU Flight of the Hummingbird; A Parable for the Environment - This little book features artwork by internationally renowned artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas. His distinct and lively Haida Manga style engages perfectly with this inspirational story that encourages every individual to act on behalf of the worlds limited and precious resources. http://mny.ca/ Athlii Gwaii: The Line at Lyell (46:30 min.) 2003 Part of the Ravens and Eagles: Haida Art series Jeff Bear/Marianne Jones, Ravens and Eagles Productions In the fall of 1985, a small but resolute troupe of Haida elders journeyed by helicopter to Athlii Gwaii (Lyell Island) to join their young counterparts in a stand against clearcutting. Industrial invasion in the remote archipelago had gone too far. Ancient cedar giants and rare spruce trees—lifeblood of Haida art and culture—had been leveled indiscriminately for too long. Buoyed by their courageous Haida elders, protesters united in peaceful resistance. A total of 72 people were arrested, but their tactics garnered global attention and won change: in 1987, the government established the Gwaii Haanas Park Reserve/Haida Heritage Site. http://www.movingimages.ca/catalogue/Art/re_athliigwaii.html
Views: 4407 heartspeak
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 13992400 LastWeekTonight
Elder In The Making | Episode 2: Westward Trek
 
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Cowboy revisits his hometown of Fort Macleod, the first outpost of the Northwest Mounted Police on Blackfoot territory. The settler's account of history is told. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 7985 STORYHIVE
Aboriginal Education
 
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Education has long been heralded as the key to economic improvement. Leading economist Don Drummond has studied the economic inequality of Canada's First Nations and concluded that every effort must be taken to lead young people to post-secondary education. What barriers make a university or college education extremely difficult to achieve for First Nations young people?
Clear Skies - a family violence story
 
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www.lawbc.help/clearskies - a family violence story created for the Legal Services Society (Legal Aid BC)
Views: 3110 HealthyAboriginal
Crisis on Tap Full Video for CAHR
 
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Filled with interviews and interesting facts from indigenous peoples and scientists from Canada and around the world, fresh footage and new perspectives, this documentary offers a unique insight into the current conditions of water quality in Canada’s First Nations Communities. Some of these results are surprising and some are shocking and it is our hope that this documentary will engage, but more importantly, inform viewers. The Producer and Director is Dr Jeffrey Reading, (Mohawk Tyendinaga), and the Associate Producers are Robynne Edgar, (Metis Ancestry from Batoche) and Karen Davies (Cedarwood Productions).
Views: 4550 cedarwoodproductions
National Chief Perry Bellegarde - Canada 2020 Aboriginal Peoples and Economic Development
 
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Canada 2020 Event - Aboriginal Peoples and Economic Development
Elder In The Making | Episode 5: A Broken Treaty
 
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What follows from the treaty signing is a genocide in slow motion. Elder Narcisse Blood shares his story growing up in residential school and the person he has become. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 7634 STORYHIVE
FNS - Elder Teachings by Napos
 
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This is an oral recording of Medicine Wheel teachings by Napos, Menominee Nation. The oral teachings are accompanied by video images and pictures. The oral teachings reflect a traditional First Nations worldview and including teachings on concept of "4" and the Seven Gifts as a way of living in the world.
Views: 2282 UW Green Bay
Think Indigenous 11 Dr Pam Palmater_March 20 2015
 
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Dr. Pam Palmater, Ryerson University
Views: 2425 Usask
Haida Art-Northern Villages Part 2.m4v
 
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In November of 2008, Dr. George MacDonald, Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Art Studies at SFU and author of "Haida Monumental Art", gave a 3-part lecture series on Haida Villages. 

Dr. MacDonald is a renowned expert on Northwest Coast art and has written a series of books on the subject. The presentations are illustrated with historical photographs from the 1870's and onward and explore the distinctive art of twenty-five Haida villages. 

The final instalment of these lectures, "Northern Villages", has been broken down into 2 parts.
Decolonizing Language Revitalization
 
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September 25, 2013 - How has Eurocentric anthropology and linguistics affected the way we interpret our elders and ancestors who share their cultural knowledge with foreign researchers? Join us for a presentation with Khelsilem Rivers and April Charlo, indigenous peoples from community-based and cultural revitalization backgrounds, who will be discussing decolonization of language revitalization. Their presentation and open dialogue will address the context of rapid language loss and decline, and how colonization has affected or is embedded in the strategies of revitalization. In an effort to revitalize Indigenous languages, communities may have unknowingly adopted or assimilated colonized ways of thinking as they invest interest and attempt to repair or restore ties to culture and language. Are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha, et all with an English-mind or are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha with a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyaw, Kanien'keháka mind? Indigenous languages represent one of the darkest ways in which ethnocide and cultural genocide have occurred. It is expected in the next twenty-five years over 700 of the worlds Indigenous languages will be forgotten. In the Vancouver area alone, the two Indigenous languages are considered critical endangered; Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) language has five to seven fluent speakers and hən̓q̓əmin̓əm has one fluent speaker left. Decolonizing Language Revitalization aims to put forward perspectives of shifting values, cultural understandings, and impacts on community. It is the stories we tell ourselves (as a people) that impacts who we believe we are, and then who we become. But if the stories -- even including, or especially the Indigenous ones -- are filtered through colonialism, we have become a different people because of it. April Charlo from Bitterroot Salish people and is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Montana. Khelsilem Rivers is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh-Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw language revitalization activist from Vancouver. Supported by SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement http://sfuwoodwards.ca/index.php/community
2014 Sol Kanee Lecture - Justice Murray Sinclair
 
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The Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul's College, University of Manitoba, is proud to present the Eleventh Annual Sol Kanee Lecture on International Peace and Justice. This year's guest lecturer was Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (www.trc.ca). Justice Sinclair addressed the question: What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? The lecture took place on Monday, September 29, 2014 at the University of Manitoba. 0:04 Opening Remarks and Welcome: Dr. Sean Byrne, Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul’s College 4:32 Greetings: Dr. Chris Adams, Rector, St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba 6:55 Introduction of Justice Murray Sinclair: Dr. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Native Studies, University of Manitoba 17:20 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 1 46:28 Video presentations – Justice Murray included a series of video interviews with residential school survivors as a part of his lecture 53:30 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 2 1:29:33 Question and Answer Period: Dr. Sean Byrne, Moderator 1:59:12 Acknowledgement Peace and Conflicts Studies students, Ms. Mary Anne Clarke and Ms. Jennifer Ham acknowledge and thank Justice Sinclair 2:01:18 Concluding Remarks: Dr. Sean Byrne For more information on this and other Mauro Centre events, please visit: www.facebook.com/maurocentre www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/mauro_centre/
Views: 1172 MauroCentre
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 2- A Knowledge Gap
 
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The effects of Residential Schools, and the forces of colonization, are examined in relation to First Nations health
Views: 5594 fnhealthcouncil
WE ARE STILL HERE In depth preview Lakota docuementary
 
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An in depth preview of the upcoming documentary WE ARE STILL HERE by Value Creaton Films www.facebook.com/valuecreationfilms about Lakota life in the 21st century. Presented in association with SAVE OUR TRIBAL YOUTH www.saveourtribalyouth.com and Crawford Multi Media www.crawafordmultimedia.com
Views: 31152 Rick Kline
Aboriginal Title and Provincial Regulation: The Impact of Tsilhqot'in Nation v BC
 
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In partnership with the Centre for Global Studies and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance, UVic Law presents this two-hour panel discussion and Continuing Legal Education (CLE) course on this case of national significance. Panelists include: Jay Nelson (General Counsel to the Tsilhqot'in Nation, Associate Counsel at Woodward & Company), Krista Robertson (Lawyer at JFK Law Corporation with expertise in Aboriginal Rights Law) and Dr. John Borrows (Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria).
Views: 6681 UVic Law
Behold, America! | Symposium | Part 5
 
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Patricia Kelly, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, Canada Measuring Here and There, or the Decentralization of American Art When influential art critic and curator Lucy Lippard staged 955,000 in Vancouver, BC in January 1970, she was acknowledging the international aspirations and interconnectivity of much American conceptual art. Participating artists such as Robert Smithson, Douglas Huebler, and Sol LeWitt, had, by this time, well established practices concerned with mapping and relationality. Lippard's push towards decentralization signaled a broader desire among contemporary artists and critics to increase opportunities for sustained intellectual and creative inquiry, to understand art practice from a global (rather than regional) perspective, and to expand networks of like-minded artists across national borders in often unexpected and creative ways. Using this exhibition as a point of departure, this paper will explore the circulation of artists between the US and the West Coast of Canada in the late 60s and early 70s, and its potentially destabilizing effect on American art history. Conversation with James Luna & Michael Hatt, Ph.D. Dr. Hatt is Professor in the History of Art at the University of Warwick, England Wang Dang Doodle Encounters, or Representing the Indian, Then and Now James Luna's practice has focused on cross-cultural, multicultural, and current cultural issues in contemporary American Indian society. He will present his most recent installation, which opened last month at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Luna will be joined by Michael Hatt to discuss his work in relation to art history, the representation of Native Americans in the past, and the ways in which that history is presented to the public. Deborah Butterfield Deborah Butterfield is a major American sculptor whose subject since the 1970s has been the horse. Butterfield earned an MFA from the University of California, Davis, and is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, from such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts. In this presentation, Butterfield will overview much of her career, from her college works to her current studio practice. Derrick Cartwright, Ph.D. Director of University Galleries and Professor of Practice, Art History at the University of San Diego Proliferating Participation: American Art Displays in Eras of Crisis Contemporary American museum culture is fraught with challenges. In the face of weakening public support, institutions today claim that they seek audience engagement as a key to maintaining relevance and achieving sustainability. This talk explores the ways that "participation" has often been held up as a virtue by American art exhibitions past and present. From Robert Henri's 1915 exhibition of Modern American Painting at the Panama California Exposition to ambitious projects, like Behold, America!, the stakes of encouraging new participatory practices have at once evolved and grown more urgent across the United States. www.TheSanDiegoMuseumofArt.org Video produced by Balboa Park Online Collaborative
scope8 - Kill the Bombs, Not the Humans
 
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Respect & Empathy, to All victims of Nuclear Detonations. Link to an animation of every nuclear missile detonated between 1945-1998 http://www.ctbto.org/specials/1945-1998-by-isao-hashimoto/ Also to victims of any explosive deliberatley deployed to cause harm or death.... US FORCES EARLIER FIREBOMBING OF TOKYO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombing_of_Tokyo STOP ALL BOMBING, AND LANDMINING http://www.icbl.org/intro.php Not that im a Socialist. Here is an article by someone who is shedding light a foul practice. CANCER RATE IN FALLUJAH, IRAQ HIGHER THAN HIROSHIMA OR NAGASAKI By Tom Eley - World Socialist Web Site 23 July 2010 The Iraqi city of Fallujah continues to suffer the ghastly consequences of a US military onslaught in late 2004. According to the authors of a new study, "Cancer, Infant Mortality and Birth Sex-Ratio in Fallujah, Iraq 2005--2009," the people of Fallujah are experiencing higher rates of cancer, leukemia, infant mortality, and sexual mutations than those recorded among survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in the years after those Japanese cities were incinerated by US atomic bomb strikes in 1945. The epidemiological study, published in the International Journal of Environmental Studies and Public Health (IJERPH), also finds the prevalence of these conditions in Fallujah to be many times greater than in nearby nations. The assault on Fallujah, a city located 43 miles west of Baghdad, was one of the most horrific war crimes of our time. After the population resisted the US-led occupation of Iraq—a war of neo-colonial plunder launched on the basis of lies—Washington determined to make an example of the largely Sunni city. This is called "exemplary" or "collective" punishment and is, according to the laws of war, illegal. The new public health study of the city now all but proves what has long been suspected: that a high proportion of the weaponry used in the assault contained depleted uranium, a radioactive substance used in shells to increase their effectiveness. In a study of 711 houses and 4,843 individuals carried out in January and February 2010, authors Chris Busby, Malak Hamdan, Entesar Ariabi and a team of researchers found that the cancer rate had increased fourfold since before the US attack five years ago, and that the forms of cancer in Fallujah are similar to those found among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors, who were exposed to intense fallout radiation. FULL ARTICLE HERE http://www.wsws.org/articles/2010/jul2010/fall-j23.shtml Link to an animation of every nuclear missile detonated between 1945-1998 http://www.ctbto.org/specials/1945-1998-by-isao-hashimoto/ Thank you to all our contributors for kindly permissioned featured content. Full list on website.
Views: 533 solunasonic
National Aboriginal Day (2010)
 
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National Aboriginal Day (NAD) is celebrated every June 21st. NAD is a time for all Canadians to recognize the unique heritage, the diverse cultures and the outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. For more information about Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, please visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca. For more information about National Aboriginal day, please visit http://www.nad.gc.ca. Read a transcript of this video on the AANDC web site: http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013727/1100100013729
Views: 4031 GCIndigenous
Are the Metis Treaty People?
 
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Dr. Adam Gaudry from the University of Saskatchewan argues that the Manitoba Act should be thought of as a treaty between the Metis Nation and Canada. Part of the 2015-2016 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series presented by the Indigenous Affairs Office. From January 6, 2016.
Views: 8224 UWinnipeg
Engaging Minds: Jim Miller
 
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Jim Miller - Canada Research Chair Native-Newcomer Relations It's an exciting time for Jim Miller to be studying Native-Newcomer Relations. As Canada Research Chair in Native-Newcomer Relations at the U of S he explores why we have had so much trouble living together in the past and how we might build better relationships in the future.
Views: 369 uofsresearch
Early Spring Medicine Walks with Elder Betty McKenna
 
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These videos were filmed during the spring, summer, and fall of 2009 in a Medicine Wheel near Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. Elder Betty McKenna is Anishnabe and Métis from Shoal River First Nation, Manitoba. The videos were realized by the First Nations University of Canada under the supervision of Dr. Carrie Bourassa and Dr. Fidji Gendron. The videos show different plants during the growing season, how to recognize them, and how they are used by First Nations and Métis people. Plants collected during these walks are now on display in the Medicine Room at the First Nations University of Canada.
Views: 4290 medicineroom1
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 1 - System of Wellness
 
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Dr. Evan Adams (Smoke Signals) narrates Implementing the Vision: BC First Nations Health Governance, an evocative documentary explaining issues in First Nations health and the efforts to address them. The film describes the plan by BC First Nations, in partnership with federal and provincial governments, to change health care systems in British Columbia. Told in four parts, the film uses interviews in a story-telling approach to a complex and fascinating history and the move to improve First Nations health that is unfolding in BC today.
Views: 11897 fnhealthcouncil
Tlingit Music--Past, Present and Future: Ed Littlefield at TEDxSitka
 
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Ed Littlefield is a Tlingit Native of Southeast Alaska currently working on composing and arranging Native music from the Tlingit tradition. He studied percussion at the University of Idaho and has played in the Idaho-Washington Symphony, The Orion Trombone Quartet, Dallas Brass, the Jazz Police and many other professional groups in the Northwest. Ed has recently completed an album combining traditional Alaskan Native music with jazz, called "Walking Between Worlds," featuring the Native Jazz Quartet: Ed Littlefield (drums); Jason Marsalis (vibes); Christian Fabian (bass); and Reuel Lubag (piano). His talk focuses on this fusion and the possibilities it offers. About TEDx, x = independently organized event. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 4059 TEDx Talks
20 Years Later: Renewing Understanding of the Treaty Land Entitlement Framework Agreement
 
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By: Trisha Delormier-Hill, Dwayne Johns and Harry Lafond The Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School (JSGS) in cooperation with the Office of the Treaty Commissioner are pleased to present a panel presentation that will examine the development and implementation of the 1992 Treaty Land Entitlement Framework Agreement (TLE), which marked its 20th Anniversary in September 2012. This panel presentation will provide an overview and history of TLE in Saskatchewan and will examine impetus of land claim resolution in Saskatchewan, the opportunities of TLE Framework Agreement and the elements that allow resolution and opportunity for First Nations with TLE claims. The panel will also look to the future and forecast what the next 20 years will look like for First Nations and governments as they continue to resolve outstanding land claims, as well as highlight the economic opportunities that First Nations have benefitted from in acquiring lands.
Views: 1157 jsgspp
Indigenous Feminisms Power Panel
 
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Views: 5735 Usask
Engaging Minds: Sylvia Abonyi
 
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Sylvia Abonyi - CRC Aboriginal Health Sylvia Abonyi is Canada Research Chair in Aboriginal Health and a member of the Saskatchewan Population Health Research Unit where she looks for ways to involve northern Saskatchewan community members in improving health in their communities.
Views: 790 uofsresearch
Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada
 
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Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada with Keith Conn -- Chief Operation Officer, First Nations Statistical Institute (FNSI) March 27, 2012 Bannatyne Campus, University of Manitoba The Canada Lecture is an initiative from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, Canada's leading agency dedicated to the elimination of racism in the country. This lecture took place with the joined participation of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, the First Nations Statistical Institute and the University of Manitoba.
Elder in the Making | Episode 1: Cowboy X
 
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Cowboy, a Blackfoot aboriginal and Chris, a Chinese-Canadian, agree to go on roadtrip across traditional Blackfoot territory rediscover the stories of their shared home. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 16886 STORYHIVE
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 3- Current Health Services
 
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The current picture of First Nations is described, including limitations in decision-making and governance.
Views: 3102 fnhealthcouncil
Tillie Black Bear: Four Directions prayer & song in Michigan
 
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Tillie Black Bear is the executive director and one of the founders (31 years ago) of the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society, Inc. (WBCWS) that serves the Lakota Sioux Rosebud Reservation in Mission, SD She spoke to the Northern Michigan University 2008 Uniting Neighbors in the Experience of Diversity (UNITED) Conference on September 23, 2008. This is the first of several videos about her talk in the Great Lakes Room of the NMU University center and a roundtable discussion that followed down the hall. Black Bear is introduced to the northern Michigan audience and sings the Direction Song. With traditional sage burning, Black Bear sings as she and the crowd face the four directions - West, North, East, South - and honor the Sky and Earth. Her visit was coordinated by the NMU Center for Native American Studies and the non-profit Turtle Island Project (TIP) in Munising, MI. The TIP has held several concerts and other events to raises funds for the WBCWS. TIP Director Rev. Dr. Lynn Hubbard travels several times a year to the Rosebud Reservation. Black Bear was greeted by Dr. Judith Puncochar, NMU Professor and an organizer of the annual UNITED Conference. Tillie Black Bear was introduced by Grace Chaillier, an NMU Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Center for Native American Studies and a registered member of the Sicangu Lakota band of the Rosebud Sioux. Please watch the other Turtle Island Project videos on Tillie Black Bear's talk in northern Michigan. Black Bear addresses the Lakota teen suicide crisis, domestic violence, people respecting people and many other important issues. Black Bear is an enrolled member of the Sicangu Lakota Nation/Rosebud Sioux Tribe. She is one of the leading experts on violence against women and children. She is a founding mother of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) and a founder of the South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (SDCADV&SA) both in 1978. She was the first woman of color to chair NCADV and continues to sit on the SDCADV&SA Board of Directors. Black Bear presently serves on the advisory board of National Sexual Assault Resource Center, Pennsylvania and is past member of the professional advisory board of the National Domestic Violence Hotline, Austin, TX. Black Bear was the recipient of an award from the U.S. Department of Justice for her work with victims of crime in April 1988; and in 1989 was one of President Bushs Point of Light. In 1999 at the Millennium Conference on Domestic Violence in Chicago, IL, Black Bear was one of 10 individuals recognized as one of the founders of the domestic violence movement in the United States. She was awarded an Eleanor Roosevelt Human Rights Award in 2000 by President Clinton. In May, 2003 Black Bear was a recipient of the first annual LifeTime Achievement Award from LifeTime Television. Black Bear was selected as one of 21 Leaders for the 21st Century award by Womens eNews in 2004. In 2005, she received an award from NOW. She is retired from Sinte Gleska University as a part-time instructor in Human Services; Casey Foundation as a licensed foster parent. Currently, Black Bear works as a teacher of 13 years teaching students taking a course on cross-cultural ministry at Catholic Theological Union through Shalom Ministries out of Chicago, IL. Black Bear and colleague Sally Roesch Wagner, Ph.D. have completed a poster series on D/Lakota women elders on each of the nine Dakota/Lakota Nations in South Dakota entitled: D/Lakota Women Keepers of the Nation. Another collaborative work is workshops on issues of Racism and Cultural Diversity. She has worked as a therapist, certified school counselor, administrator, college instructor and comptroller. She holds a Master of Art (1974) from the University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD; Bachelor of Science (1971), Northern State University, Aberdeen, SD. She has served on the St. Francis Indian School Board of Directors, St. Francis, SD; and Sinte Gleska University Board of Regents, Mission, SD. Black Bear is single mother of 3 girls, grandmother of thirteen and survivor of domestic violence. --- NMU Center for Native American Studies www.nmu.edu/Centers/NativeAmericanStudies [email protected] April Lindala, Director 906-227-1397 [email protected] Grace Chaillier, NMU Professor 906-227-1390 [email protected] --- WBCWS www.wbcws.org Javier H. Alegree, WBCWS Public Relations Specialist 605-856-2317 Rosebud Sioux Tribe Sicangu Lakota www.rosebudsiouxtribe-nsn.gov --- UNITED www.nmu.edu/UNITED --- Turtle Island Project Munising, MI Co-founders Rev. Dr. Lynn Hubbard, Rev. Dr. George Cairns http://turtleislandtv.blip.tv www.youtube.com/MunisingWhiteHorse www.myspace.com/TurtleIslandProject [email protected]
Views: 9561 MunisingWhiteHorse
Robbie Waisman, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Robbie Waisman, Buchenwald survivor, Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre Speaker, and feature speaker for the Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Robbie Waisman Robbie Waiseman was born in Skarszysko, Poland and liberated from Buchenwald concentration camp at the age of 14. He immigrated to Canada as a war orphan in 1948. Today, Mr. Waisman is a retired businessman, past president and current board member of the Vancouver Holocaust Centre Society, and a survivor outreach speaker who educates thousands of BC students annually. Mr. Waisman was recently named as an 'Honorary Witness' by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.
Dara Parker, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Dara Parker, Executive Director of QMUNITY, BC's Queer Resource Centre, and feature speaker for the Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Dara Parker Dara Parker is a community planner with a background in diversity and inclusion and 15 years' experience working in non-profits and local government. She is a regular commentator on queer issues and has been featured on Global BC, CTV, CBC, CKNW, The Vancouver Sun, The Georgia Straight and The Vancouver Courier. She began her career working in international development and has travelled to 48 countries, spanning five continents. Her CIDA-funded youth engagement work in Lesotho (Southern Africa), inspired her to return to pursue a Masters in Planning at the University of British Columbia, with a focus on how to build inclusive cities. Dara's notable achievements include: working for Kids Help Phone, the United Nations Association in Canada, the City of Burnaby, and Cuso International. For three years Dara consulted with UN-Habitat on their inaugural Youth Advisory Board, helping mainstream youth participation throughout the organization. Dara volunteers as Co-President of the United Nations Association in Canada Vancouver Board, promoting public engagement on global issues. In 2010/2011, Dara took a sabbatical year travelling in Colombia and Spain to learn Spanish and write about the intersections of culture and sustainability. An active athlete, Dara can be found teaching snowboarding on Grouse Mountain or playing volleyball around Vancouver.
Residential School Survivor Personal Stories
 
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Part 2 of 2 Personal stories by Elder Hazel Squakin
Views: 3798 Aboriginal Education
Sherry Farrell Racette - "Escaping the Cage: Cultural Performance as Activism, 1890-1951"
 
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Sherry Farrell Racette presents the paper "Escaping the Cage: Cultural Performance as Activism, 1890-1951." Part of Imagining History: A Canadian Women Artists History Initiative Conference, May 3-5 2012, Concordia University. This video has been created for educational purposes only. If you are the copyright holder to any of the images projected in the video and you object to their use in this fashion, please contact [email protected] .
Views: 415 CWAHI Concordia
Perspectives on Native Representations Symposium: Keynote Speaker Panel
 
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Friday, February 20, 2015 Perspectives on Native Representations Symposium: Keynote Speaker Panel Dr. Adrienne Keene, Migizi Penseneau & Matika Wilbur While the history between Native peoples and representations of identity projected upon them (having been replicated and reinforced in popular culture) is layered and complex, the rise of technology and social media has ushered in an era of accessible activism that pushes against this history. Native peoples across the world now have practicable, highly visible modes to express unique voices that challenge and redefine how Natives are represented both internal and external of their communities. "Perspectives on Native Representations" seeks to highlight the multiple contexts through which representations of Native communities, culture and individuals are being shifted and re-imagined. Sponsored by UC Berkeley's Native American Student Development. Co-sponsored by the Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues.
Views: 1477 issi
Harvest of Hope: 4 Phil Fontaine
 
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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 4, Phil Fontaine gives a talk entitled, "The Apology Breakthrough: Now What?" Chief Phil Fontaine (Sagkeeng First Nation) is a dedicated and highly respected leader in Canada. He has been instrumental in facilitating change and advancement for First Nations people from the time he was first elected to public office as Chief, at the young age of twenty-eight. He is a proud member of the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba and still plays an active role in the support of his community. In the early 1980s he was elected to the position of Manitoba Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations. When his term expired in 1991, he was elected Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs where he served three consecutive terms. He played a key role in the development of Manitoba's Framework Agreement Initiative and in the defeat of the Meech Lake Accord, and signed an Employment Equity Agreement with thirty-nine federal agencies. In 1997 he stepped onto the national stage where he was elected to the highest elected position in First Nations politics, National Chief. He is now serving an unprecedented third term in office. His list of accomplishments as National Chief include signing the Declaration of Kinship and Cooperation of the Indigenous and First Nations of North America; being the first Indigenous leader to address the Organization of American States; leading the successful resolution and settlement of the 150-year Indian residential school tragedy; the Making Poverty History Campaign; lobbying for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People; and negotiating a fair and just process for the settlement of specific land claims. National Chief Fontaine has received many awards and honors for his work, including four honorary degrees and membership in the Order of Manitoba. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views: 1662 SmithsonianNMAI
Inside Story Americas - Canada's indigenous movement gains momentum
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Canada's Idle No More movement began as a small social media campaign - armed with little more than a hashtag and a cause. But it has grown into a large indigenous movement, with protests and ceremonial gatherings held almost daily in many of the country's major cities. The movement is spearheaded by Theresa Spence, the leader of the Attawapiskat, a small native band in northern Ontario. Spence is now 22 days into a hunger strike on Ottawa's Victoria Island just across from the Canadian Parliament. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 18324 Al Jazeera English
Wunusweh Lecture in Aboriginal Law 2016
 
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"Truth, Reconciliation, and Legal Education: The TRC Syllabus and Indigenous Laws" presented by Gillian Calder, University of Victoria, Karen Drake, Lakehead University, and Aimée Craft, University of Manitoba. Recorded Feb. 1, 2016 at the College of Law, University of Saskatchewan
Views: 969 CollegeOfLawUsask
Data Issues: Multiple Testing, Bias, Confounding, Missing...
 
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Dr. Lance Waller from Emory University presents a lecture titled "Data Issues: Multiple Testing, Bias, Confounding, & Missing Data." View Slides https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4IAKVDZz_JUczRSd0NucjlhT00 Lecture Abstract Once data are scraped, wrangled, linked, merged, and analyzed, what information do they reveal and can we trust the resulting conclusions? In this presentation, we define and review data issues relating to the analysis and interpretation of observational data from the field of epidemiology and consider implications for data science, especially regarding the goal of moving from big data to knowledge. Specifically, we explore concepts of bias, confounding, effect modification, and missing/mismeasured data as applied to data science. We provide an analytic context based on sampling concepts and explore relevant literature and tools from epidemiology, biostatistics, computer science, and data science. As with many issues in data science, the full applicability of the concepts is very much a work in progress and present multiple opportunities for future development. About the Speaker Lance A. Waller, Ph.D. is Rollins Professor and Chair of the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. He is a member of the National Academy of Science Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics. His research involves the development of statistical methods for geographic data including applications in environmental justice, epidemiology, disease surveillance, spatial cluster detection, conservation biology, and disease ecology. His research appears in biostatistical, statistical, environmental health, and ecology journals and in the textbook Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data (2004, Wiley). Join our weekly meetings from your computer, tablet or smartphone. Visit our website to view our schedule and join our next live webinar! http://www.bigdatau.org/data-science-seminars
Idle No More: Protest to Change?
 
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Momentum and a movement: Idle No More organizers, supporters and observers discuss the objectives and significance of the movement with Steve Paikin.
RSC 2012 Governor General Lecture Series: We Are All Treaty People: Maritime Beginnings
 
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The Royal Society of Canada 2012 Governor General Lecture Series Professor James Miller, FRSC September 19th 2011 - Dalhousie University Duration: 41:17
Views: 723 RSC SRC
First Nation's Treaty History in B.C., Canada
 
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This was broadcasted in the 90's and gives us a timeless understanding of the challenges First Nations have faced in Canada. There are some scenes of great radio host and sadly missed Jack Webster (resident on Saltspring), interviewing a First Nations hero Frank Calder.
Views: 12631 saltspringpictures
Promise - Education As A Treaty Right (Part 1)
 
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A look at First Nations education within Treaty 8 First Nations in Alberta. This documentary is the first in a series of three videos that shows the challenges faced by Educators, Administrators and communities in teaching their children on-reserve. With interviews and discussions by people working on the ground at these schools this video gives you a window into modern "Indian" education within Northern Alberta. Produced by Bearpaw Communications and the Treaty 8 Education Commission. Copyright by Treaty 8 First Nations of Alberta
Views: 1827 Treaty8FirstNations
JSGS Public Lecture~Saskatchewan First Nations and the Province's Resource Future
 
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Presented by Chief Bellegarde, Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Saskatchewan is in the middle of an unprecedented resource boom. With oil and gas in the south, potash in central Saskatchewan and uranium in the North, along with promising mineral plays in various locations,Saskatchewan's economy is growing rapidly. First Nations are determined to benefit from the boom, as Treaty Peoples with strong ties to the land and with promises from government that we will benefit from development. With duty to consult and accommodate requirements in place, Saskatchewan First Nations have become national leaders in working out appropriate collaboration and impact and benefit agreements with companies and governments. Much more can be done. More First Nations can be employed on the resource projects. Greater care can be taken to protect our traditional lands and protect our people from harm. There are important business opportunities for First Nations companies that remain to be developed. First Nations will not stand in the way of properly managed development that is based on consultations and agreements with our communities, but nor will First Nations agree to open-ended development strategies that do not return a fair share of the benefits from resource development with the Saskatchewan First Nations.
Views: 1299 jsgspp
Medicine Walk with Elder Walter Lavallee
 
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This video was filmed during the spring of 2009 on Piapot First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Elder Walter Lavallee is Cree from the Piapot First Nation, Saskatchewan. The video was realized by the First Nations University of Canada under the supervision of Dr. Carrie Bourassa and Dr. Fidji Gendron. The video shows different plants, how to recognize them, and how they are used by First Nations and Métis people. Plants collected during this walk are now on display in the Medicine Room at the First Nations University of Canada.
Views: 23729 medicineroom1

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