Home
Search results “Solwara 1 mining lease agreement”
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
 
06:45
Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
Views: 3144 Inhabitants
RESEARCH: Computer generated seafloor
 
00:23
This animation of the seafloor as a barren plain without any visible flora or fauna is sourced from Nautilus Minerals online video gallery - http://www.nautilusminerals.com/irm/content/video-gallery.aspx?RID=421 Nautilus was granted its first Mining Lease in January 2011 for Solwara 1, an experimental seabed mining project in the Bismarck Sea in Papua New Guinean waters. The Papua New Guinea (PNG) government issued Nautilus with an exploration license without consulting local residents. Most PNG residents by a big margin oppose Solwara 1. [1] As well as in Papua New Guinean waters, Nautilus wants to mine in international waters too. It is the first publicly owned private sector organisation to be granted an exploration licence in the highly prospective Clarion Clipperton Fracture Zone in the Central Pacific. [1] https://www.scidev.net/asia-pacific/environment/news/png-seabed-mining-restarts-following-dispute- settlement.html
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 2: Deep Frontiers
 
06:47
Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg instagram: inhabitants_tv #inhabitants Written by anthropologist Stefan Helmreich, What is Deep Sea Mining? Episode 2: Deep Frontiers is a brief history about knowledge of the deep sea and its resources. It highlights the ambiguity of this history, as depictions of the deep changed throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, this knowledge informs discussions about the commercialization of biological and geological resources, with the deep sea fast becoming a zone of international dispute, opening up a debate about sustainable practices at sea. What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode web series dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This web series addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Stefan Helmreich is Professor of Anthropology at MIT. He is the author of Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas, and, most recently, of Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond (Princeton University Press, 2016). His essays have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, American Anthropologist, Cabinet, and The Wire. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 oceanolivre.org/ facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Stefan Helmreich, Matt Gianni, and everyone who helped this web series. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Commissioned by TBA21 - Academy. FB: TBA21–Academy @TBA.Academy Instagram: @tba21academy web: tba21.org/ tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282 #deepseamining
Views: 543 Inhabitants
Experimental Seabed Mining in New Ireland
 
08:19
The development of the Experimental Sea Bed Mining in New Ireland is strongly being push by the PNG Government despite local and national outcry against it. Nautilus Minerals Inc which plans to mine copper and gold from 'high - grade massive sulphide deposits' 30 Km off the West Coast of New Ireland, was granted the world's first mining lease by the Government of Papua New Guinea in 2011. The mining lease cover a sea area of 59km known as Solwara 1. However, the people of New Ireland who has strong traditional connections with their seas and environment do not want the project as they believe it will destroy their very foundation.
Views: 526 BRG Films
BRGs' EFFORTS TO STOP EXPERIMENTAL SEABED MINING
 
06:27
This video shows how the people are battling to stop the world's first experimental sea bed mining in Papua New Guinea. Nautilus Minerals Inc. who was granted a mining lease by the PNG government initially planned to set up an office in Madang, however, was unsuccessful because the people refuse to let them. It then moved East New Britain Province, but was sent away again by the people. Nautilus Minerals Inc is now in New Ireland Province. The battle is on to completely get rid of this Project in the waters of Papua New Guinea.
Views: 126 BRG Films
All Hands on Deck - Day 2
 
04:09:58
Chapter 1 0:04 Welcome - Joi Ito, MIT Media Lab Chapter 2 14:03 - Keynote Address - Nainoa Thompson, Polynesian Voyaging Society Chapter 3 52:40 - CREATE, Building connections and engagement through the arts Chapter 4 1:28:07 - Lightning Talks Chapter 5 2:00:48 - EXPLORE, Empowering a global community of ocean explorers Chapter 6 2:41:10 - CONNECT, Connecting people to the ocean and to each other Chapter 7 3:25:35 - Here be Dragons Update Chapter 8 3:29:24 - Workshops 2A Chapter 9 3:56:21 - Closing Remarks To fully explore and understand the ocean, we can no longer rely on a handful of large, expensive research vessels and vehicles. We truly need "all hands on deck" to do it. On November 8-9, 2018, we brought together leaders and changemakers in ocean exploration, entertainment, recreation, and art to imagine new ways to empower an open, inclusive global community of ocean explorers. Our goal is to imagine creative ways to make the ocean so pervasive in modern culture that everyone has a positive association with and understanding of the sea. More information at: https://www.media.mit.edu/events/allhandsondeck/ License: CC-BY-4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
Views: 787 MIT Media Lab