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Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part One)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies. This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Indigenous Perspectives and Representations in the Media - panel discussion
 
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With Jennifer David, Jocelyn Formsma and Howard Adler (bios below). Moderated by Greg Macdougall. On Saturday Nov 17, 2012 at the Media Democracy Conference - http://organizingforjustice.ca - University of Ottawa, unceded Algonquin territory. Hosted by Organizing For Justice, and the Ottawa Working Group of the Media Co-op. Panel Description: A facilitated discussion on the intersection of Indigenous peoples and the media. What approaches do Indigenous media-makers adopt in doing their work? How well are mainstream and alternative media doing in considering and representing Indigenous perspectives to both Native and non-Native audiences? What work still needs to be done? Bios: Jocelyn Formsma is a member of the Moose Cree First Nation and currently lives in Ottawa, ON. Jocelyn has extensive experience in children's rights and youth engagement and has a Bachelor of Social Sciences in Public Administration. She is currently pursuing her law degree from the University of Ottawa and will graduate in 2015. She is a film maker and host of "The Circle", a radio show featuring Indigenous artists and issues, on CHUO the Ottawa U campus radio station. Jennifer David was born and raised in northern Ontario and is a member of Chapleau Cree First Nation. She has spent her career working in and supporting Aboriginal media in Canada, first at Television Northern Canada, then as APTN's first Director of Communications, then as a consultant with Debwe Communications. Jennifer has a degree in Journalism from Carleton University and currently runs her own First Nation management consulting company called Stonecircle. She recently self-published a book about the launch of APTN: "Original People, Original Television". Howard Adler is an award winning writer, and an artist that has worked in diverse mediums, including visual art, sound art, stained glass, theatre, dance, video editing, and film. In 2009 he won the Canadian Aboriginal Youth Writing Challenge (19-29 age category) with his video script "Johnny Seven Fires". He is currently the Co-Director of the Asinabka Festival, an Indigenous film and media arts festival that had its inaugural year in Ottawa in June 2012. Howard is Jewish and Anishinaabe and a member of Lac des Mille Lacs First Nation in North-western Ontario.
Views: 2099 org4jus
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 3- Current Health Services
 
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The current picture of First Nations is described, including limitations in decision-making and governance.
Views: 3760 fnhealthcouncil
"All My Relations: Biennale of Sydney 2012"
 
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The Dr. Allen Root Contemporary Art Distinguished Lecture with Gerald McMaster Ph.D., Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art, Art Galley of Ontario Dr. McMaster was recently selected as co-Artistic Director to the 2012 Biennale of Sydney. In his lecture, he will touch on the themes and issues that will shape this important international exhibition. Dr. McMaster, a curator and artist, was responsible for the installation of the permanent exhibitions at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, and more recently the reinstallation of the Canadian Wing at the Art Gallery of Ontario. His publications include New Tribe/New York (2005), Remix (2007), and the critically acclaimed Inuit Modern (2011). His awards and recognitions include the 2001 ICOM-Canada Prize, the 2005 National Aboriginal Achievement Award, and the Order of Canada (2007). Location: Arthur M. Loew Auditorium
Views: 4759 Dartmouth
Sortie Collective Salsa janvier 2016
 
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Une petite vidéo de la sortie collective Salsa Loca le 24 janvier 2016, au Domingo Latino à Strasbourg.
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 208274 Shari Wing
Freelancer All Movie cutscenes
 
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Freelancer by Digital Anvil and Microsoft Studios All Movie cutscenes Link: https://youtu.be/ikIYKIT7Rng Join the discussion on Discord https://discord.gg/HRCmDB4 Before Elite Dangerous and after WIng COmmander came Freelancer. Sporting nearly 2 hours of Cutscenes and story this game brought immersion and gameplay together This is quite the SciFi movie to watch and does tell a good story from a time where games were interested in the narrative and not just the expanse of an open world WAYS TO SUPPORT THE CHANNEL ✔️LIKE THE VIDEO ✔️SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHANNEL ✔️WATCHING THE STREAM Freelancer is a space trading and combat simulation video game developed by Digital Anvil and published by Microsoft Game Studios. It is a chronological sequel to Digital Anvil's Starlancer, a combat flight simulator released in 2000. The game was initially announced by Chris Roberts in 1999, and following many production schedule mishaps and a buyout of Digital Anvil by Microsoft, it was eventually released in March 2003. In the game, players take on the roles of spacecraft pilots. These characters fly single-seater ships, exploring the planets and space stations of 48 known star systems. They also engage in dogfights with other pilots (player- and computer-controlled) to protect traders or engage in piracy themselves. Other player activities include bounty-hunting and commodity trading. The single-player mode puts the player in the role of Edison Trent, who goes through a series of missions to save the Sirius sector from a mysterious alien force. In multiplayer mode, players are free to take on any role and to explore anywhere from the start #retrogaming #pcgaming #freelancer
Views: 625 Ricardo's Gaming