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Bruce Schneier: "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World"
 
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Bruce Schneier, American cryptographer, computer security and privacy specialist, will be coming to Google to talk about his new book: "Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World" "You are under surveillance right now. "Your cell phone provider tracks your location and knows who’s with you. Your online and in-store purchasing patterns are recorded, and reveal if you're unemployed, sick, or pregnant. Your e-mails and texts expose your intimate and casual friends. Google knows what you’re thinking because it saves your private searches. Facebook can determine your sexual orientation without you ever mentioning it. "The powers that surveil us do more than simply store this information. Corporations use surveillance to manipulate not only the news articles and advertisements we each see, but also the prices we’re offered. Governments use surveillance to discriminate, censor, chill free speech, and put people in danger worldwide. And both sides share this information with each other or, even worse, lose it to cybercriminals in huge data breaches. "Much of this is voluntary: we cooperate with corporate surveillance because it promises us convenience, and we submit to government surveillance because it promises us protection. The result is a mass surveillance society of our own making. But have we given up more than we’ve gained? In Data and Goliath, security expert Bruce Schneier offers another path, one that values both security and privacy. He shows us exactly what we can do to reform our government surveillance programs and shake up surveillance-based business models, while also providing tips for you to protect your privacy every day. You'll never look at your phone, your computer, your credit cards, or even your car in the same way again." (W.W. Norton & Co., Inc)
Views: 35977 Talks at Google
DEF CON 23 - Eijah - Crypto for Hackers
 
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Hacking is hard. It takes passion, dedication, and an unwavering attention to detail. Hacking requires a breadth of knowledge spread across many domains. We need to have experience with different platforms, operating systems, software packages, tools, programming languages, and technology trends. Being overly deficient in any one of these areas can add hours to our hack, or even worse, bring us total failure. And while all of these things are important for a well-rounded hacker, one of the key areas that is often overlooked is cryptography. In an era dominated by security breaches, an understanding of encryption and hashing algorithms provides a tremendous advantage. We can better hone our attack vectors, especially when looking for security holes. A few years ago I released the first Blu-Ray device key, AA856A1BA814AB99FFDEBA6AEFBE1C04, by exploiting a vulnerability in an implementation of the AACS protocol. As hacks go, it was a simple one. But it was the knowledge of crypto that made it all possible. This presentation is an overview of the most common crypto routines helpful to hackers. We'll review the strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm, which ones to embrace, and which ones to avoid. You'll get C++ code examples, high-level wrapper classes, and an open-source library that implements all the algorithms. We'll even talk about creative ways to merge algorithms to further increase entropy and key strength. If you've ever wanted to learn how crypto can give you an advantage as a hacker, then this talk is for you. With this information you'll be able to maximize your hacks and better protect your personal data. Speaker Bio: Eijah is the founder of demonsaw, a secure and anonymous content sharing platform, and a Senior Programmer at a world-renowned game development studio. He has over 15 years of software development and IT Security experience. His career has covered a broad range of Internet and mid-range technologies, core security, and system architecture. Eijah has been a faculty member at multiple colleges, has spoken about security and development at conferences, and holds a master’s degree in Computer Science. Eijah is an active member of the hacking community and is an avid proponent of Internet freedom.
Views: 48184 DEFCONConference
DEF CON 23 - Dan Petro and Oscar Salaza - Hacking Smart Safes: On the Brink of a Robbery
 
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Have you ever wanted to crack open a safe full of cash with nothing but a USB stick? Now you can! The Brink’s CompuSafe cash management product line provides a “smart safe as a service” solution to major retailers and fast food franchises. They offer end-to-end management of your cash, transporting it safely from your storefront safe to your bank via armored car. During this talk, we’ll uncover a major flaw in the Brink’s CompuSafe and demonstrate how to crack one open in seconds flat. All you need is a USB stick and a large bag to hold all of the cash. We’ll discuss how to remotely takeover the safe with full administrator privileges, and show how to enumerate a target list of other major Brink’s CompuSafe customers (exposed via configuration files stored right on the safe). At any given time, up to $240,000 can be sitting in each of the 14,000 Brink’s CompuSafe smart safes currently deployed across the United States - potentially billions of dollars just waiting to be stolen. So come ready to engage us as we explore these tools and more in this DEMO-rich presentation. And don’t forget to call Kenny Loggins… because this presentation is your highway to the Danger Zone… Note - This presentation is about exposing flaws in the Brinks’s Compusafe to improve security and allow pentesters to demonstrate these flaws to their customers. Please use this information responsibly. Speaker Bios: Dan Petro is a Security Associate at Bishop Fox (formerly Stach & Liu), a security consulting firm providing IT security services to the Fortune 500, global financial institutions, and high-tech startups. In this role, he focuses on application penetration testing and secure development. Dan has presented at numerous conferences, including DEF CON, BlackHat, HOPE, and BSides, and is the founding member of the Pi Backwards CTF team. Prior to joining Bishop Fox, Dan served as Lead Software Engineer for a security contracting firm. Dan holds a Bachelor of Science from Arizona State University with a major in Computer Science, as well as a Master’s Degree in Computer Science from Arizona State University. Oscar Salazar is a Senior Security Associate at Bishop Fox (formerly Stach & Liu), a security consulting firm providing IT security services to the Fortune 500, global financial institutions, and high-tech startups. In this role, he focuses on application penetration testing, source code review, and secure software design. Oscar has presented at RSA, Bsides, and Adobe’s annual private Security Summit conference. Prior to joining Bishop Fox, Oscar served as a web security research engineer at Hewlett-Packard’s Application Security Center where he designed and developed security checks for the WebInspect web application security scanner. In addition, his research involved developing more effective methods of scanning Web 2.0 applications. Oscar holds a Bachelor of Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology with a major in Computer Science and a focus on Networking and Security.
Views: 2362 DEFCONConference
Digital rights management
 
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Digital Rights Management (DRM) is a class of technologies that are used by hardware manufacturers, publishers, copyright holders, and individuals with the intent to control the use of digital content and devices after sale; there are, however, many competing definitions. With first-generation DRM software, the intent is to control copying; With second-generation DRM, the intent is to control executing, viewing, copying, printing and altering of works or devices. The term is also sometimes referred to as copy protection, copy prevention, and copy control, although the correctness of doing so is disputed. DRM is a set of access control technologies. Companies such as Amazon, AT&T, AOL, Apple Inc., Google, BBC, Microsoft, Electronic Arts, Sony, and Valve Corporation use digital rights management. In 1998, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) was passed in the United States to impose criminal penalties on those who make available technologies whose primary purpose and function are to circumvent content protection technologies. The use of digital rights management is not universally accepted. Some content providers claim that DRM is necessary to fight copyright infringement and that it can help the copyright holder maintain artistic control or ensure continued revenue streams. Proponents argue that digital locks should be considered necessary to prevent "intellectual property" from being copied freely, just as physical locks are needed to prevent personal property from being stolen. Those opposed to DRM contend there is no evidence that DRM helps prevent copyright infringement, arguing instead that it serves only to inconvenience legitimate customers, and that DRM helps big business stifle innovation and competition. Furthermore, works can become permanently inaccessible if the DRM scheme changes or if the service is discontinued. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1079 Audiopedia