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Saskatchewan's Link to Diamonds
 
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Who knew Saskatchewan played an essential role in the global diamond industry? For more info, visit http://www.src.sk.ca/ or http://saskatchewanderer.ca/ Music from http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Southman/
Views: 1230 Sask Wanderer
JSGS Public Lecture~Saskatchewan First Nations and the Province's Resource Future
 
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Presented by Chief Bellegarde, Chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Saskatchewan is in the middle of an unprecedented resource boom. With oil and gas in the south, potash in central Saskatchewan and uranium in the North, along with promising mineral plays in various locations,Saskatchewan's economy is growing rapidly. First Nations are determined to benefit from the boom, as Treaty Peoples with strong ties to the land and with promises from government that we will benefit from development. With duty to consult and accommodate requirements in place, Saskatchewan First Nations have become national leaders in working out appropriate collaboration and impact and benefit agreements with companies and governments. Much more can be done. More First Nations can be employed on the resource projects. Greater care can be taken to protect our traditional lands and protect our people from harm. There are important business opportunities for First Nations companies that remain to be developed. First Nations will not stand in the way of properly managed development that is based on consultations and agreements with our communities, but nor will First Nations agree to open-ended development strategies that do not return a fair share of the benefits from resource development with the Saskatchewan First Nations.
Views: 1299 jsgspp
Saskatchewan
 
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Saskatchewan (/səˈskætʃəwən/ or /səˈskætʃəˌwɑːn/) is a prairie province in Canada, which has a total area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi) and a land area of 592,534 square kilometres (228,800 sq mi), the remainder being water area (covered by lakes/ponds, reservoirs and rivers). Saskatchewan is bordered on the west by the Province of Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. As of December 2013, the population of Saskatchewan was estimated at 1,114,170. Residents primarily live in the southern half of the province. Of the total population, 257,300 live in the province's largest city, Saskatoon, while 210,000 live in the provincial capital, Regina. Other major cities include Prince Albert, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Swift Current and North Battleford. Saskatchewan was first explored by Europeans in 1690 and settled in 1774, having also been inhabited for thousands of years by various indigenous groups. It became a province in 1905, its name derived from the Saskatchewan River. The river was known as kisiskāciwani-sīpiy ("swift flowing river") in the Cree language. In the early 20th century the province became known as a stronghold for Canadian democratic socialism. Tommy Douglas, who was premier from 1944 to 1961, became the first social-democratic politician to be elected in North America. The province's economy is based on agriculture, mining, and energy. Saskatchewan's current premier is Brad Wall and its lieutenant-governor is Vaughn Solomon Schofield. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 321 Audiopedia
Oil Fields: American Frontier 1953 American Petroleum Institute; Williston Basin, North Dakota
 
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more at http://quickfound.net/ "Film describes events taking place after discovery of oil in Williston Basin, North Dakota." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williston,_North_Dakota Williston is a city in and the county seat of Williams County, North Dakota, United States. The 2010 census gave its population as 14,716, and the Census Bureau gave the 2013 estimated population as 20,850, making Williston the sixth largest city in North Dakota. The North Dakota oil boom is largely responsible for the sharp increase in population. Founded in 1887, Williston was named for Daniel Willis James, a board member of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, by his friend, railroad owner, James J. Hill. Williston's newspapers, both in print and online, are the daily Williston Herald and the weekly The Williston Trader. Sloulin Field International Airport is a public airport 3.2 km (2.0 mi) north of the business district. Williston is the home of Williston State College and the Miss North Dakota Scholarship Pageant... Economy Williston's economy, while historically agricultural, is increasingly being driven by the oil industry. Williston lends its name to the Williston Basin, a huge subterranean geologic feature known for its rich deposits of petroleum, coal and potash. Williston sits atop the Bakken formation, which by the end of 2012 was predicted to be producing more oil than any other site in the United States, surpassing even Alaska's Prudhoe Bay, the longtime leader in domestic output in the United States. Williston has seen a huge increase in population and infrastructure investments during the last several years with expanded drilling using the 'frac' petroleum extraction technique in the Bakken Formation and Three Forks Groups. (The State of North Dakota provides a website detailing daily oil activity.) In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that there were 150 million barrels of oil "technically recoverable" from the Bakken shale. In April 2008, the number was said to be about four billion barrels; in 2010 geologists at Continental Resources, the major drilling operation in North Dakota, estimated the reserve at eight billion. In March 2012, after the discovery of a lower shelf of oil, it announced a possible 24 billion barrels. Although current technology allows for extraction of only about 6% of the oil trapped 0.99–1.99 mi (1.6–3.2 km) beneath the earth's surface, recoverable oil might eventually exceed 500 billion barrels... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williston_Basin The Williston Basin is a large intracratonic sedimentary basin in eastern Montana, western North Dakota, South Dakota, and southern Saskatchewan, that is known for its rich deposits of petroleum and potash. The basin is a geologic structural basin but not a topographic depression; it is transected by the Missouri River. The oval-shaped depression extends approximately 475 miles (764 km) north-south and 300 miles (480 km) east-west. The Williston Basin lies above an ancient Precambrian geologic basement feature, the Trans-Hudson Orogenic Belt that developed in this area about 1.8-1.9 billion years ago, and that created a weak zone that later led to sagging to produce the basin. The Precambrian basement rocks in the center of the basin beneath the city of Williston, North Dakota lie about 16,000 feet (4,900 m) below the surface... Petroleum The long history of sedimentary deposition in the Williston Basin included deposition of rocks well suited to serve as hydrocarbon source and reservoir rocks. The basin's oil and gas fields are found in a wide range of geologic ages, as indicated by the generalized stratigraphic column. Oil was first found in the Williston Basin along the Cedar Creek Anticline in southeastern Montana, in the 1920s and 1930s. The basin did not become a major oil province until the 1950s when large fields were discovered in North Dakota. Amerada, the largest independent oil firm, began the search in 1946. After four years of testing and mapping they started drilling at a promising lease 30 miles north-east of Williston, ND and on April 4, 1951 found a large field of oil underground. Immediately other oil firms rushed in to buy up leases on farm land to explore for oil and by 1954 80% of the possible oil producing areas were under lease. Shell at that time had leases over 8 million acres. Many local farmers and area speculators became instant millionaires, leasing land at an average of $25 an acre and then selling those leases back at a much higher cost per acre. Production peaked in 1986, but in the early 2000s significant increases in production began because of application of horizontal drilling techniques, especially in the Bakken Formation. Cumulative basin production totals about 3.8 billion barrels (600,000,000 m3) of oil and 470 billion cubic feet (1.3×1010 m3) of natural gas...
Views: 7267 Jeff Quitney
Vlaad Sees `Stability' in Canada Attracting U.S. Bankers: Video
 
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Oct. 6 (Bloomberg) -- Bill Vlaad, president of Vlaad & Co., talks with Bloomberg's Mark Crumpton and Julie Hyman about the hiring of U.S. bankers by Canadian firms. (Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 331 Bloomberg
Potash
 
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Potash /ˈpɒtæʃ/ is any of various mined and manufactured salts that contain potassium in water-soluble form. The name derives from "pot ash", which refers to plant ashes soaked in water in a pot, the primary means of manufacturing the product before the industrial era. The word "potassium" is derived from potash. Today, potash is produced worldwide at amounts exceeding 30 million tonnes per year, mostly for use in fertilizers. Various types of fertilizer-potash thus constitute the single largest global industrial use of the element potassium. Potassium was first derived by electrolysis of caustic potash, in 1808. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 242 Audiopedia
Saskatchewan
 
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Saskatchewan is a prairie province in Canada, which has a total area of 651,900 square kilometres and a land area of 592,534 square kilometres , the remainder being water area . Saskatchewan is bordered on the west by the Province of Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. As of December 2013, the population of Saskatchewan was estimated at 1,114,170. Residents primarily live in the southern half of the province. Of the total population, 257,300 live in the province's largest city, Saskatoon, while 210,000 live in the provincial capital, Regina. Other major cities include Prince Albert, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Swift Current and North Battleford. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 270 encyclopediacc
Thorium.
 
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http://ThoriumRemix.com/ Thorium is an abundant material which can be transformed into massive quantities of energy. To do so efficiently requires a very different nuclear reactor than the kind we use today- Not one that uses solid fuel rods, but a reactor in which the fuel is kept in a liquid state. Not one that uses pressurized water as a coolant, but a reactor that uses chemically stable molten salts. Such a reactor is called a "Molten Salt Reactor". Many different configurations are possible. Some of these configurations can harness Thorium very efficiently. This video explores the attributes of Molten Salt Reactors. Why are they compelling? And why do many people (including myself) see them as the only economical way of fully harnessing ALL our nuclear fuels... including Thorium. This video has been under development since 2012. I hope it conveys to you why I personally find Molten Salt Reactors so compelling, as do the many volunteers and supporters who helped create it. Much of the footage was shot by volunteers. All music was created by: http://kilowattsmusic.com To support this project, please visit: https://patreon.com/thorium Entities pursuing Molten Salt Reactors are... Flibe Energy - http://flibe-energy.com/ Terrestrial Energy - http://terrestrialenergy.com/ Moltex Energy - http://www.moltexenergy.com/ ThorCon Power - http://thorconpower.com/ Transatomic - http://www.transatomicpower.com/ Seaborg - http://seaborg.co/ Copenhagen Atomics - http://www.copenhagenatomics.com/ TerraPower - http://terrapower.com/ Bhabha Atomic Research Centre - http://www.barc.gov.in/ Chinese Academy of Sciences - http://english.cas.cn/ Regular Thorium conferences are organized by: http://thoriumenergyalliance.com/ http://thoriumenergyworld.com/ Table of Contents 0:00:00 Space 0:17:29 Constraints 0:28:22 Coolants 0:40:15 MSRE 0:48:54 Earth 0:59:46 Thorium 1:22:03 LFTR 1:36:13 Revolution 1:44:58 Forward 1:58:11 ROEI 2:05:41 Beginning 2:08:36 History 2:38:59 Dowtherm 2:47:57 Salt 2:51:44 Pebbles 3:06:07 India 3:18:44 Caldicott 3:35:55 Fission 3:56:22 Spectrum 4:04:25 Chemistry 4:12:51 Turbine 4:22:27 Waste 4:40:15 Decommission 4:54:39 Candlelight 5:13:06 Facts 5:26:08 Future 5:55:39 Pitches 5:56:17 Terrestrial 6:08:33 ThorCon 6:11:45 Flibe 6:20:51 End 6:25:53 Credits Some of this footage is remixed from non-MSR related sources, to help explain the importance of energy for both space exploration and everyday life here on Earth. Most prominently... Pandora's Promise - https://youtu.be/bDw3ET3zqxk Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson - https://youtu.be/Pun76NZMjCk Dr. Robert Zubrin - https://youtu.be/EKQSijn9FBs Mars Underground - https://youtu.be/tcTZvNLL0-w Andy Weir & Adam Savage - https://youtu.be/5SemyzKgaUU Periodic Table Videos - https://youtube.com/channel/UCtESv1e7ntJaLJYKIO1FoYw
Views: 131965 gordonmcdowell
Saskatchewan | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Saskatchewan Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Saskatchewan ( (listen)) is a prairie and boreal province in western Canada, the only province without natural borders. It has an area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi), nearly 10 percent of which (59,366 square kilometres (22,900 sq mi)) is fresh water, composed mostly of rivers, reservoirs, and the province's 100,000 lakes. Saskatchewan is bordered on the west by Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, to the northeast by Nunavut, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. As of late 2017, Saskatchewan's population was estimated at 1,163,925. Residents primarily live in the southern prairie half of the province, while the northern boreal half is mostly forested and sparsely populated. Of the total population, roughly half live in the province's largest city Saskatoon, or the provincial capital Regina. Other notable cities include Prince Albert, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Swift Current, North Battleford, Melfort, and the border city Lloydminster (partially within Alberta).Saskatchewan is a landlocked province with large distances to moderating bodies of waters. As a result, its climate is extremely continental, rendering severe winters throughout the province. Southern areas have very warm or hot summers. Midale and Yellow Grass near the U.S. border are tied for the highest ever recorded temperatures in Canada with 45 °C (113 °F) observed at both locations on July 5, 1937. In winter, temperatures below −45 °C (−49 °F) are possible even in the south during extreme cold snaps. Saskatchewan has been inhabited for thousands of years by various indigenous groups, and first explored by Europeans in 1690 and settled in 1774. It became a province in 1905, carved out from the vast North-West Territories, which had until then included most of the Canadian Prairies. In the early 20th century the province became known as a stronghold for Canadian social democracy; North America's first social-democratic government was elected in 1944. The province's economy is based on agriculture, mining, and energy. Saskatchewan's current lieutenant governor is Thomas Molloy and the current premier is Scott Moe. In 1992, the federal and provincial governments signed a historic land claim agreement with First Nations in Saskatchewan. The First Nations received compensation and were permitted to buy land on the open market for the bands; they have acquired about 3,079 square kilometres (761,000 acres; 1,189 sq mi), now reserve lands. Some First Nations have used their settlement to invest in urban areas, including Saskatoon.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Mining
 
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Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 247 encyclopediacc
Medicinal Plants
 
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Welcome to this edition of Clemson Extension Live where we talk about the upcoming annual conference for the American Council for Medicinally Active Plants. Information provided/discussed in this presentation is for educational purposes only. Always consult with your personal doctor or medical professional regarding any specific health concerns/questions you may have. RELATED ARTICLE: http://bit.ly/2s10s76
Western Canada | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Western Canada Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Western Canada, also referred to as the Western provinces and more commonly known as the West, is a region of Canada that includes the four provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. British Columbia is culturally, economically, geographically, and politically distinct from the other parts of Western Canada and is often referred to as the "west coast" or "Pacific Canada", while Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba are grouped together as the Prairie Provinces and most commonly known as "The Prairies".
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Doctoral Program Conference: #decoding, Session 1, Unsettling
 
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3/11/16 Power inscribes order on space through codes. Bureaucratic codes measure and normalize dynamic ecologies and constitute the substrate of any infrastructural system, organization, and praxis. They striate space and punctuate time to increase efficiency, maximize profit, reduce risk, and maintain order in cultural, social, economic, and political spheres. #decoding gauges the agency of spatial practices in relation to the challenges and capacities prompted by codes and protocols. Organized by students in the Doctor of Design Studies program, this conference investigates the impact of codes, concerned with mapping of environments, demarcation of legal territories, operational protocols of logistics and risk management, and codes of building and subtraction. By exposing the spatial and socio-cultural implications of micro-politics embedded in the hidden codes and protocols, we speculate about the potential agency of design practices mediating between processes of normalization, and the live, complex, and unpredictable ecologies of human habitation.
Views: 2335 Harvard GSD

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