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Mining industry's boom in Central America did not benefit the people
 
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Over the past two decades mining industry became increasingly important in Central America. However, despite the mining companies are making large profits by extracting these contries' resources, the boom of this industry did not bring the social benefits expected in these countries. http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/web/telesur/#!en/video/mining-industrys-boom-in-central-america-did-not-benefit-the-people
Views: 53 TeleSUR English
Canadian Mining Companies: Blood on Their Hands
 
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Canadian mining companies are responsible for dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries to grassroots activists across Latin America over the past 15 years. http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/v/canadian-mining-companies-blood-on-their-hands/
Views: 1099 TeleSUR English
Opportunities for Mining Service Companies in Latin America
 
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Opportunities for Mining Service Companies in Latin America - Peru, Colombia, Mexico and Argentina Latin America offers a great environment for foreign mining companies. With an abundance of unexplored natural resources and governments open to foreign participation in the sector, it comes as no surprise that Latin America remains a powerful mining region. Watch the video below and see how you can take advantage of the available opportunities. Conversely, get in contact with one of our mining experts for personalized support. [email protected] https://www.bizlatinhub.com/legal-services/
Views: 37 Biz Latin Hub
Canadian Mining Corporations in Latin America: Solidarity Rally
 
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"Trade agreements are a weapon against communities! Community consent over corporate bullying! La lucha sigue; the struggle continues!" In 2008, after years of violence, conflict, environmental degradation, and water pollution at the hands of mining companies, then-president of El Salvador Antonio Saca stopped issuing new mining permits. This decision has widespread support in El Salvador; a recent poll of the University of Central America (UCA) indicates that that 79.5% of Salvadorans are against any gold mining. In 2009, after pleading with El Salvador to reconsider, OceanaGold (then called Pacific Rim) sued the whole country through an "investor-state dispute settlement" (ISDS) case at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), the World Bank Group’s arbitration venue. The charge? "Loss of potential profits." These types of suits are increasingly possible under free trade agreements, including ones currently being negotiated by our government (for example: the TPP and CETA). If OceanaGold wins, the Salvadoran people will be required to pay $250-million (US), a morally reprehensible demand. Already, in the seven years that this arbitration has gone on, $12 million USD in legal costs have been incurred, which is enough to pay for over two years of adult literacy classes in El Salvador. Despite hearing that the verdict could be released "any day now" for over a year, we have been told with confidence by the lawyers on the case that the tribunal will announce its decision at noon on October 14th. Join us just a few hours later as we share the decision and call out Canada's complicity in this act of corporate bullying! ---------------- Civil society groups worldwide that support Salvadoran communities and organizations working on mining and environmental issues cheered today’s decision by the ICSID tribunal that Pacific Rim/OceanaGold’s $250 million lawsuit against El Salvador is without merit. In a ruling released today, the investment tribunal rejected the company’s claims and ordered it to pay $8 million in legal fees and costs to the government of El Salvador. “At a time of water scarcity, it is unconscionable for the global trade and investment regime to deny governments of water-stressed countries like El Salvador the policy space to protect local watersheds and ensure the realization of the human right to water,” says Maude Barlow, national chairperson of the Council of Canadians. “Let us be clear: El Salvador has not ‘won’ anything in this arbitration. El Salvador had to pay more than $12 million just to defend itself. These legal costs are enough to pay for over 2 years of adult literacy classes for 140,000 people. At a minimum, OceanaGold should reimburse El Salvador for the costs of this suit, which never should have taken place. And it should also be responsible for the social and environmental damage left in its wake,” says Jamie Kneen of MiningWatch Canada. Recorded in Toronto, 14 October 2016.
Views: 296 LeftStreamed
The New Conquistadors: Canadian Mining Companies Battle for Panama's Natural Resources
 
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Learn more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/panama-canada-gold-copper-mining-protests-environmental-destruction "The New Conquistadors," a documentary produced through a collaboration between the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the CBC News, explores the battle between the Canadian companies and local communities in Panama. As Canadian mining companies seek to expand their presence in Central America, some Panama's indigenous peoples and peasant farmers worry that the mining could lead to deforestation, polluted water supply and the displacement of local communities—including the Ngobe people, Panama's largest indigenous group. The plan to unearth billions of dollars worth of precious metals is a boon for these Panamanian communities, according to the mining companies; they bring jobs and economic development to the developing countries. But for the peasant farmers and indigenous peoples, the rewards aren't worth sacrificing the environment. "The New Conquistadors" will air on CBC on June 18, 2012. This report is part of Pulitzer Center-sponsored project "Panama: The Canadian Conquistadors" (http://bit.ly/Kj4Qnm).
Views: 2997 Pulitzer Center
The Devastating Effects Of Gold Mining
 
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How Algae Could Change The Fossil Fuel Industry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCNkmi7VE0I » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Gold has been a valuable commodity for centuries, but the process to obtain it has dangerous costs. So what is true price of gold? Learn More: National Geographic: The Real Price of Gold http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/01/gold/larmer-text/3 Business Insider: The Cost Of Mining An Ounce Of Gold http://www.businessinsider.com/the-cost-of-mining-gold-2013-6 Al Jazeera: The true price of gold http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/techknow/articles/2015/6/4/the-true-price-of-gold.html More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld
Views: 142824 NowThis World
Congo, My Precious. The Curse of the coltan mines in Congo
 
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Watch more https://rtd.rt.com/tags/illegal-mining/ The Democratic Republic of Congo in Africa is one of the world’s most resource-rich countries. A wide range of rare minerals can be found here in abundance, all commanding high prices in world commodity markets. Diamonds for jewellery, tantalum, tungsten and gold for electronics; uranium used in power generation and weaponry and many others. Congo has copious deposits of raw materials that are in high demand internationally but remains one of the poorest countries in the world. From colonisation, with the horrors of slavery and other atrocities, to a turbulent and equally brutal present in which militant groups control the mines, Congo’s richness in natural resources has brought nothing but misery. Referred to as “conflict minerals”, these riches leave only a trail of death, destruction and poverty. Under Belgian rule, Congolese labourers were often required to meet quotas when mining different minerals. Failure could mean punishment by having a hand cut off with a machete. The country gained independence in 1960, but that didn’t put a stop to slave and child labour or to crimes being committed to extract and exploit the minerals. Warring militant fractions from inside the country and beyond seized control of mines for their own benefit while terrorising local populations. For our translator, Bernard Kalume Buleri, his country’s history of turmoil is very personal; like most Congolese people, he and his family fell victim to the unending mineral based power struggle. Born in the year of his country’s independence, he has lived through war and seen his homeland torn apart by violent looting and greed. His story is a damning testament, illustrating how nature’s bounty, instead of being a blessing, becomes a deadly curse. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/rtd_documentary_channel/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
Views: 968211 RT Documentary
Precious and Base Metal Mining Company in Latin America 拉丁美洲贵金属和基本金属矿业公司 - NAI500 PDAC 2019 Coverage
 
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In this interview at the recent PDAC 2019 Convention in Toronto, NAI500 spoke with Mike McAllister, Vice President of Sierra Metals Inc.(TSX:SMT) about its precious metals and base metals mining operations in Mexico and Peru. 在最近多伦多PDAC 2019年大会的采访中,NAI500与Sierra Metals Inc.(TSX:SMT) 副总裁Mike McAllister就其在墨西哥和秘鲁的贵金属和基本金属采矿业务进行了交谈。 Join us at an upcoming event! 参加我们即将举行的活动! 活动网页: https://nai500.com/zh-hans/events/ Stay Connected! 持续关注 NAI500! Website: https://nai500.com Twitter: @NAI500 LinkedIn: NAI Interactive Ltd Facebook: @naigcff Copyright © 2019 NAI Interactive Ltd. All rights reserved.
Views: 40 NAI500andGCFF
Dominican Republic, the BEST and the WORST of Latin America? - VisualPolitik EN
 
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The Dominican Republic is a very special place in Latin America. Not only because we can find incredible places like Punta Cana, Bayahibe or Puerto Plata here, among many others, but also because this was the first land that Christopher Columbus touched when he discovered America in 1492. That is, for better or for worse, it was here, in what we know today as the Dominican Republic, where Latin America’s modern history began. Its capital, Santo Domingo was the first city in the entire American continent and it’s were the first cathedral, first university and first hospital were built. Well, today, 526 years after Christopher Columbus’s arrival, the Dominican Republic has become a good reflection of the best and worst of Latin America. On the one hand, the Dominican Republic, thanks to places like Punta Cana, is fashionable and has managed to make tourism its own gold mine.. But on the other hand, poverty, corruption, drug trafficking and many of the policies that have slowed down the region for years, are threatening its future. In this video we tell you all the lights and shadows of the Dominican Republic. Support us on Patreon! www.patreon.com/visualpolitik And don't forget to visit our friend’s podcast, Reconsider Media: http://www.reconsidermedia.com/
Views: 120411 VisualPolitik EN
Top 10 Countries With The LARGEST Gold Reserves!
 
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Check out these 10 countries with the largest gold reserves in the world! This top 10 list features some of the richest and wealthiest countries on earth that have tons of gold bars stacked up somewhere! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "SURPRISING And Interesting Facts About Money!" video here: https://youtu.be/ONpChSPqVc4 Watch our "Most AMAZING Discoveries With A Metal Detector!" video here: https://youtu.be/45JveYKafVo Watch our "Most EXPENSIVE Diamonds In The World!" video here: https://youtu.be/RcZATf3Lmb0 10.) India According to the World Gold Council, the Bank of India currently holds 557.7 tons of gold. It is one of the largest stores of gold in the world! This makes up 9.9 % of the country’s total foreign reserve. Foreign exchange reserves is money or other assets held by a nation’s central bank so they can back the national currency. India, home to 1.25 billion people, is the number one largest consumer of the precious metal. Furthermore, India is one of the most reliable drivers of global demand. For example, India’s festival and wedding season, which runs from October to December, has historically been a major market for gold. And probably, one of the most interesting facts about India and gold is that India rarely invests much in gold. This is because as a country, India operates under the belief that buying gold leads to a deficit. And their belief must be proving right as things also seem to be improving for India. For instance, if you look at the last few years, India has increased its gold reserves from 557.74 to 557.77. While this might not seem like a lot, India is also at its highest point in history! In addition to what the country holds, Indian households which are considered the world’s largest hoarders of gold, hold a record 23,000-24,000 tons, which is worth about $800 billion. 9.) Netherlands In the past few years, the Netherlands has held 52% of its foreign reserve in gold. The Netherlands has a reported 612.45 tons. In 2016 it was reported that the bank was looking for a place to store all its gold because they were going to renovate the vaults and needed to moving it. The Dutch central bank is planning to move the country’s gold reserves from the center of Amsterdam to a new complex called the Cash Center. Like most countries, Dutch gold is also held in banks around the world to reduce risk. Security measures to guard the gold 24/7 have become a problem in Amsterdam. 189,000 kilos of gold will be moved at the beginning of 2022. Maybe this is one reason that over the last decade and a half, the Netherlands was selling off tons of gold in order to reduce its reserve. However, there weren’t that many buyers out there and they sold less than the country wanted. More recently the country has had less ambition to sell gold. Currently, the country holds the same amount of tons, 612.45 that they have over the last few years. However, the country has increased its percentage of foreign reserves to 61.2 %. 8.) Japan Japan is another country which had been increasing its gold reserves since the 1960’s. Their official gold holdings were reported at 765.2 tons. About 2.4% of Japan’s gold today is in foreign reserve. Historically, Japan has always held a bit more gold than other countries. This was true until 2011, when they began to sell some of their reserve in order to pump money into the economy after the tsunami and the following Fukushima nuclear disaster. But even with selling, Japan’s central bank has been one of the most aggressive practitioners of quantitative easing. For example, in January of 2016, it lowered interest rates below zero, which has helped fuel demand in gold around the world. 7.) Switzerland Prior to 1997, Switzerland was steadily building its gold reserves. In 1997, the decision was made to sell some of those reserves to bolster the Swiss currency and diversify the foreign reserves. The percent of foreign reserves in Switzerland is currently 6.7 %. Switzerland actually has the world’s largest reserves of gold per capita and currently has reported 1,040 tons. Over time, many citizens in the country started to feel like the bank was getting rid of too much gold. They then banded together with the “Save the Swiss” movement. However, once everyone was able to vote in 2014, the vote came to a no, and gold continued to be sold. During World War II, Switzerland became the center of the gold trade in Europe, making transactions with both the Allies and Axis powers. Today, much of its gold trading is done with Hong Kong and China. Around last year, the Swiss National Bank made a $5.9 billion profit, reportedly from its gold holdings. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 2084517 Origins Explained
What are the Opportunities for Mining Service Companies in LATAM - Biz Latin Hub
 
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With a USD$4.8 Trillion economy, over 600 million citizens and a growing middle-class, Latin America represents an attractive market for foreign investment. The region has a lot to offer, including open and transparent financial markets, attractive incentives for companies to invest, an abundance of natural resources and a vast supply of human talent. You will learn about all the opportunities for mining service companies in Latin America in this video!
Views: 74 Biz Latin Hub
Mexico Becomes New Gold Mine for U.S. Companies | David Muir | Made in America
 
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Exports to Mexico are on the rise, which could means jobs for Americans. David Muir reports this series.
Views: 114310 ABC News
Remi Piet on Elections and Mining in Latin America
 
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Speaking with INN at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Piet touched on issues election-watchers and investors would be looking into in not only Brazil, but the upcoming Argentine and Bolivian elections this year. Investing News Network (INN) Find out more about investing by INN @ http://investingnews.com/ Want a FREE investor kit? Download here↓ http://investingnews.com/resource-fre... Follow us Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/resourceinve... Follow us on Twitter: @INN_Resource The Investing News Network does not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the information reported in the interviews it conducts. The opinions expressed in these interviews do not reflect the opinions of the Investing News Network and do not constitute investment advice. All readers are encouraged to perform their own due diligence.
Views: 100 InvestingNews
Murder & Mining - Guatemalan Community Files Charges Against Canadian Mining Company
 
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SUBSCRIBE and check out our other videos! http://www.operationmaple.com http://www.facebook.com/operationmaple http://twitter.com/#!/operationmaple
Views: 748 OperationMaple
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Keynote Speech - Lindsay Appleby
 
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12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Keynote Speech - Lindsay Appleby, Her Majesty's Ambassador - Designate to Colombia The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 109 SchAdvStudy
The Zacatecas Mining District
 
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In this video, we look at the Zacatecas Mining District in detail including the current mining operations, mining history, infrastructure, and the three major vein systems. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Mr. Richard (Rick) Tschauder M.Sc. has over 30 years experience in exploration, development and production in the mining industry, both in North America and internationally. For 15 years, Rick was chief geologist for Hecla Mining Company. From 1984 until 1995, he was involved in acquisition efforts that led to a ten-fold increase in Hecla’s gold reserves, and was instrumental in bringing a number of mines to production. Since 1996 Mr. Tschauder has specialized in providing evaluation, acquisition and project management services internationally with a focus in Mexico where he has extensive knowledge of geology and the mining industry. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 848 Defiance Silver
Netco Silver Inc  Mining Companies, Mining Stocks, Silver Mining, Silver Mining Companies,
 
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Silver Opportunities Netco Silver [NEI -- TSX.V, NTCEF], is a publically-traded precious metals company committed to optimizing shareholder value through the acquisition, exploration and development of pure play silver opportunities in Latin America. The company's headquarters are in Vancouver, BC,, with a dedicated management team that brings a track record of acquiring quality assets and successfully raising capital to execute a defined business plan. The company's primary asset is the high-potential silver Toruel Property in the Rio Negro Province of Argentina.
Views: 97 netcosilver
Chile's Copper Crash: Life after the boom
 
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► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs In 2010 the world celebrated the rescue of 33 Chilean miners. But within months, the copper boom that enriched a generation of miners and made Chile one of the wealthiest countries in Latin America fizzled out. The FT reports on how the country, built on the copper industry, and its miners are struggling to come to terms with the new reality. ► Subscribe to FT.com here: http://bit.ly/2r8RJzM For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
Views: 313251 Financial Times
Chinese companies investing $20B in Peru's copper mines
 
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Peru will become the world’s second-largest copper miner, behind neighboring Chile, after China has invested $20 billion in copper mining projects. CCTV America’s Dan Collyns reported this story from Peru.
Views: 2292 CGTN America
Up Close at the San Acacio Vein
 
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In this video, we trace the San Acacio Vein along the Veta Grande Vein system on surface and get an idea of the total land package Defiance Silver controls. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Mr. Richard (Rick) Tschauder M.Sc. has over 30 years experience in exploration, development and production in the mining industry, both in North America and internationally. For 15 years, Rick was chief geologist for Hecla Mining Company. From 1984 until 1995, he was involved in acquisition efforts that led to a ten-fold increase in Hecla’s gold reserves, and was instrumental in bringing a number of mines to production. Since 1996 Mr. Tschauder has specialized in providing evaluation, acquisition and project management services internationally with a focus in Mexico where he has extensive knowledge of geology and the mining industry. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 291 Defiance Silver
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 2: Sustainable Development - Alex Prats
 
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12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 2: Sustainable Development Sustainable development is a pattern of economic growth in which resource use aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but also for generations to come. This panel will discuss economic, ecological, political and cultural sustainability in relation to the mining of mineral resources, examining its impacts on a national and local level and asking what difference the UN Guiding Principles will make to companies risk assessments and impacted communities. Alex Prats - Principal Economic Justice Adviser, Christian Aid The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 66 SchAdvStudy
Chinese company relocates town in Peru to build mine
 
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China pledges to double trade with Latin America by 2020 to $500 billion a year. Much of that trade involves ores such as copper and iron ore. The Chinese company known as Chinalco has large mining operations in Peru at a site high in the Central Andes near the mining town of Morococha, which Chinalco was forced to relocate because of its expanding operations. (Tim Johnson, Nicole L. Cvetnic / McClatchy)
San Acacio Expands Along Strike
 
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In this video, we get to understand more about the latest drill results from Holes 9,10 and 11, specifically Hole 10 which expanded San Acacio to depth. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 1452 Defiance Silver
Peru's mining industry attracting international attention
 
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Phillip Yin speaks with Boston University Research Fellow Amos Irwin to talk about Peru's lucrative mining industry and China's investment in it.
Views: 2842 CGTN Global Business
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 1: Accountable Governance - Alex Guanga Nastacuas
 
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12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 1: Accountable Governance This panel will start with an overview of the political economy of the region and the panorama in Colombia in relation to mineral extraction. It will move on to look at accountable governance mechanisms and how the Colombian government fulfils its due diligence obligations in the face of mineral extraction and multinational corporations. Finally the panel will hear from the Embera Indigenous Peoples of Colombia about the impact on their territory of multinational corporations and their struggle to protect their people, culture and territory. Alex Guanga Nastacuas - Awá Indigenous representing La Unidad Indígena del Pueblo Awá (UNIPA), Oxfam partner in Colombia The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 59 SchAdvStudy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 3: Claire White
 
15:06
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 3: UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: How should the Respect, Protect and Remedy framework be implemented? The UK strategy on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles will be presented for discussion, identifying gaps or weaknesses and looking at their real potential to ignite change. The panel will explore how corporations will implement the UN Guiding principles, their impact on corporate risk management processes and ultimately whether they will result in changes in practices. Southern Communities'perspective on human rights due diligence will be taken into account to determine what needs to be changed and how the UN Guiding Principles can be used to address these issues. Finally, could the implementation of UN Guiding principles prevent, or not, human rights violations and environmental damage? Claire White - International Council on Mining and Metals The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 27 SchAdvStudy
Panoramic View of the San Acacio Deposit
 
03:02
In this video, we get to see a full panoramic picture of the San Acacio Deposit, whereby Defiance's CEO Bruce Winfield talks on the project itself, the Veta Grande Town and Veta Grande Vein, the project's infrastructure and much more. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 1198 Defiance Silver
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Keynote Speech - Danilo Rueda
 
18:01
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Keynote Speech - Danilo Rueda, Colombian Human Rights Lawyer from the Inter-Church Commission for Justice and Peace (CIJP) will present a southern perspective on the UN Guiding Principles The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 87 SchAdvStudy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 2: Sustainable Development - Hugh Elliot
 
15:45
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 2: Sustainable Development Sustainable development is a pattern of economic growth in which resource use aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but also for generations to come. This panel will discuss economic, ecological, political and cultural sustainability in relation to the mining of mineral resources, examining its impacts on a national and local level and asking what difference the UN Guiding Principles will make to companies risk assessments and impacted communities. Hugh Elliot - International Government Relations Manager, Anglo American The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 109 SchAdvStudy
Drilling Success Rate at San Acacio
 
03:33
In this video, we look at the excellent drilling success rate we have been achieving at San Acacio by closely discussing the drill results, specifically we review Holes 5,6,7 and 8. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 234 Defiance Silver
The Banana Republics
 
06:23
this was supposed to be like three minutes long Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sam_ONella Intro and outro song: "Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G, Movement I (Allegro), BWV 1049" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 3226094 Sam O'Nella Academy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 1: Accountable Governance - Mauricio Rodriguez
 
14:37
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 1: Accountable Governance This panel will start with an overview of the political economy of the region and the panorama in Colombia in relation to mineral extraction. It will move on to look at accountable governance mechanisms and how the Colombian government fulfils its due diligence obligations in the face of mineral extraction and multinational corporations. Finally the panel will hear from the Embera Indigenous Peoples of Colombia about the impact on their territory of multinational corporations and their struggle to protect their people, culture and territory. Ambassador Mauricio Rodriguez - Colombian Ambassador to the UK The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 35 SchAdvStudy
San Acacio Drill Results Explained
 
03:58
In this video, we get to understand the geology of the San Acacio Deposit so far, whereby Defiance's CEO Bruce Winfield explains the drill results in detail and how we proceed forward. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 586 Defiance Silver
Interview with Mike Richard from Lundin Mining
 
02:15
Mike Richard, Direcotr and Business Development in Latin America from Lundin Mining, talks about his company and the work they do in Latin America and what the miners in Latin America should be prepared for going into 2016. He also discusses the key highlights of the conference this year. Find out more at: http://www.globalfinancialconferences.com/mining-and-investment-latam
Views: 356 GFC Media Group
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 2: Sustainable Development - Richard Solly
 
05:42
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 2: Sustainable Development Sustainable development is a pattern of economic growth in which resource use aims to meet human needs while preserving the environment so that these needs can be met not only in the present, but also for generations to come. This panel will discuss economic, ecological, political and cultural sustainability in relation to the mining of mineral resources, examining its impacts on a national and local level and asking what difference the UN Guiding Principles will make to companies risk assessments and impacted communities. Richard Solly - Colombia Solidarity Campaign (Chair) The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 71 SchAdvStudy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 3: Salil Tripathi
 
15:26
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 3: UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: How should the Respect, Protect and Remedy framework be implemented? The UK strategy on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles will be presented for discussion, identifying gaps or weaknesses and looking at their real potential to ignite change. The panel will explore how corporations will implement the UN Guiding principles, their impact on corporate risk management processes and ultimately whether they will result in changes in practices. Southern Communities'perspective on human rights due diligence will be taken into account to determine what needs to be changed and how the UN Guiding Principles can be used to address these issues. Finally, could the implementation of UN Guiding principles prevent, or not, human rights violations and environmental damage? Salil Tripathi - Director of Policy, Institute for Human Rights and Business The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 49 SchAdvStudy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Keynote Speeches Q&A
 
18:48
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Keynote Speeches Q&A - Lindsay Appleby, Her Majesty's Ambassador - Designate to Colombia - Danilo Rueda, Colombian Human Rights Lawyer from the Inter-Church Commission for Justice and Peace (CIJP) will present a southern perspective on the UN Guiding Principles The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 30 SchAdvStudy
The World's Largest Abandoned City - Ordos
 
04:36
Ordos The World’s Largest Abandoned City The development of the city of Ordos is a unique tale. Ordos is a city designed from scratch and built within 10 years. This city came to fruition after private mining companies were given the rights to dig into deposits in the late 90’s and 2000’s. This generated a lot of tax revenue making Ordos the 2nd highest income per capita city in China. Ordos is a city located in Inner Mongolia that has been constantly been burdened with water shortage issues. Instead of trying to revamp the current infrastructure the Chinese government decided to rebuild the city from scratch which is called “New Ordos” just 16 miles or 25 km kilometers away from the existing city now called “Old Ordos”. The people of Old Ordos refer to New Ordos as the Kangbashi district of Ordos, these new and old labels are basically not supported by anyone locally. Two villages built around the Wulan Mulan River were demolished and construction started in 2005. 161 billion dollars in infrastructure was invested to build the Kangbashi District over the first 5 years. Regardless if anyone lives in this new city, this is a major plus to the government of China as it increases China’s GDP. The government gave kickbacks to developers who helped boost GDP so building anything anywhere is promoted. The old city of Ordos or Dongsheng is home to over ½ a million people, it was expected that many of them would move to the new city as it became completed. As explained by many locals, a working couple only makes $800 a month combined of which ⅓ is taken for rent. The new apartments in New Ordos sell for 70 - 100 thousand dollars making it virtually impossible for locals to live there. Sales were slow at first but eventually investors snapped up many of the units in the new city. This has left New Ordos with a ton of infrastructure and no residents. The city was originally designed to hold 1 million people but was scaled down during construction to 500,000 then to 300,000 after coal prices crashed. The city features a 5 story shopping mall, impressive monuments and statues, art and city museum, the Ordos Dongsheng Stadium that seats 35,000 people, opera house, a brand new airport and a modern designed mosque. The city streets are lined with skyscraper after skyscraper that are almost completely empty. A toy store is one of the only stores in the massive 5 story mall, the man who runs the store says he sells something every few days and if the government doesn’t step in soon to fix it, he may have to move back to Dongsheng. It is estimated only 2 % of the buildings were ever filled the rest remain abandoned. Outside the mall an elaborate water show is put on every night with only a few people found to be watching it. A water show this size in a normal city would draw thousands of viewers daily. The city has everything it needs to be a great thriving new city like extra wide roads with bike lanes like what is found in Taipei, modern amenities and infrastructure but simply no people. The initial wave of 30,000 people that moved to New Ordos all lived in a 4 to 5 block radius just north of central park. A few years later that grew to 60,000 and now 12 years after the start of construction there are around 150,000 residents in a city that was originally designed for 1 million. The city has been doing many things to attract people to live there like moving the best schools from Dongsheng to Kangbashi. While some areas of Kangbashi aren’t a ghost town at all today, many still are. One abandoned project is the Ordos 100 Project, which is a project that was to have 100 different extreme luxury villas designed. Instead of the government doing it themselves they invited 100 different architects from around the world to each design a luxury villas to be placed on the map. Land sections were given out with the utmost creative freedom except the design was not to look like traditional Mongolian designs such as Yurts. Each architect designed their villa and construction started. Within the Ordos 100 Project site multiple half finished villas can be found. While many lay half finished some have progress going forward. Music: Melopsych-Between Mechanics n Soul Check out some of our other videos: Top 10 Fruits You’ve Never Heard Of Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRdgPyZF45g&feature=youtu.be For copyright matters please contact: [email protected] Intro music thanks to Machinmasound: Rallying the Defense: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruPk4RD19Nw Titan Top List is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com
Views: 2814481 Titan Top List
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 3: Q&A
 
18:11
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 3: UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: How should the Respect, Protect and Remedy framework be implemented? The UK strategy on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles will be presented for discussion, identifying gaps or weaknesses and looking at their real potential to ignite change. The panel will explore how corporations will implement the UN Guiding principles, their impact on corporate risk management processes and ultimately whether they will result in changes in practices. Southern Communities'perspective on human rights due diligence will be taken into account to determine what needs to be changed and how the UN Guiding Principles can be used to address these issues. Finally, could the implementation of UN Guiding principles prevent, or not, human rights violations and environmental damage? Q&A - Nadia Bernaz, Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader of the MA Human Rights and Business, Middlesex University (Chair) The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 25 SchAdvStudy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 3: Anne Lindsay
 
18:01
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 3: UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: How should the Respect, Protect and Remedy framework be implemented? The UK strategy on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles will be presented for discussion, identifying gaps or weaknesses and looking at their real potential to ignite change. The panel will explore how corporations will implement the UN Guiding principles, their impact on corporate risk management processes and ultimately whether they will result in changes in practices. Southern Communities'perspective on human rights due diligence will be taken into account to determine what needs to be changed and how the UN Guiding Principles can be used to address these issues. Finally, could the implementation of UN Guiding principles prevent, or not, human rights violations and environmental damage? Anne Lindsay, Lead Analyst Private Sector, CAFOD The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 32 SchAdvStudy
Mining in Colombia and Latin America: Panel 3: Nadia Bernaz
 
03:34
12-11-12 Human Rights Consortium http://www.sas.ac.uk/ http://events.sas.ac.uk/isa/events/view/12859/Mining+in+Colombia+and+Latin+America%3A+will+the+UN+Guiding+Principles+on+Business+and+Human+Rights+improve+accountability%3F Mining in Colombia and Latin America: will the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights improve accountability? Panel 3: UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: How should the Respect, Protect and Remedy framework be implemented? The UK strategy on the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles will be presented for discussion, identifying gaps or weaknesses and looking at their real potential to ignite change. The panel will explore how corporations will implement the UN Guiding principles, their impact on corporate risk management processes and ultimately whether they will result in changes in practices. Southern Communities'perspective on human rights due diligence will be taken into account to determine what needs to be changed and how the UN Guiding Principles can be used to address these issues. Finally, could the implementation of UN Guiding principles prevent, or not, human rights violations and environmental damage? Nadia Bernaz - Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader of the MA Human Rights and Business, Middlesex University (Chair) The UK will launch its initial strategy on implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in September 2012 and this conference will provide an opportunity to discuss and debate this strategy, to engage with the UK government on how it can best fulfil its commitment to 'Protect, Respect and Remedy', and with corporations on their ideas for the implementation of responsible mining practices and due diligence requirements. Issues of natural resource governance are invariably at the centre of development and human rights debates as the extractive sector represents a growing part of Latin American economies. In Colombia, the government has identified the mining and energy sector as a key component of its current National Development Plan and one of the 'backbones of the Colombian economy'. What changes can be made to take into account the voices of local indigenous, afro-Colombian and campesino communities? What are the challenges for companies investing in countries with poor human rights records and how are they meeting them? How is human rights due diligence seen from a Southern perspective? What difference could the UN Guiding Principles make and what concrete actions should governments be taking to improve the mining industry's environmental and social performance? Tackling these questions will be experts from a range of disciplines and key public bodies, including scholars, practitioners, and policy-makers, as well as representatives from the legal sector and mining industry. We are pleased to welcome indigenous and campesino community leaders from Colombia, including Embera and Awá indigenous peoples, to share the impact mining is having on their communities.
Views: 51 SchAdvStudy
The People's Tribunal on the Canadian Mining Industry: Day 1
 
03:07:23
Hearing on rights violations and socio-environmental impacts of the Canadian mining activities in Latin America. 9h-17h, May 30 2014 CEDA, 2515 Delisle (métro Lionel-Groulx), Montréal
Views: 317 CUTV
Talking About San Acacio AT San Acacio!
 
02:53
Defiance's CEO Bruce Winfield speaks on the San Acacio Deposit on a beautiful sunny day on location at San Acacio. Bruce discusses the Long Section in detail and much more. Mr. Bruce Winfield, M.Sc., P.Geo, has over 35 years of experience in the mining industry. Following 14 years with major mining companies Texasgulf Inc. and Boliden Inc., he focused on exploration in Central America and Mexico as VP Exploration for Greenstone Resources and Eldorado Gold Corp. leading to the exploration and development of five gold deposits including the Oronorte Gold Mine in Colombia; the open pit, heap leach Santa Rosa Gold Mine in Panama; the 60,000 oz per year La Libertad Gold Mine in Nicaragua; and the 40,000 oz per year San Andres Gold Mine in Honduras. Subsequently as President and CEO, Mr. Winfield has led companies exploring primarily in South America for the last fourteen years. Please visit our website at www.DefianceSilver.com
Views: 160 Defiance Silver
Guatemalan Women Fight Back Against A Canadian Mining Company
 
06:29
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Views: 1941 OperationMaple
VANCOUVER: Continental Day of Action VS. Canadian Extractive Industry
 
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Mining Justice Alliance joins communities across North and Latin America to decry Canadian mining corporations' role in the destruction and plunder of the environment, dislocation of community members, & killings of activists. Steve Stuart of Cafe Justicia speaks of the complicity of Canadians and directly implicates the Canadian government and its agencies in destroying communities.
Views: 146 Rio Gee
UNION GOVT WANTS "ABOLITION ACT" CASE EXPEDITED; FILES IA IN SC_Prudent Media Goa
 
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Central government has filed an application before the Supreme Court pleading to place the Goa mining related petitions for early hearing. Central Government in its application has contended that stoppage of mining is not only affecting the mining dependents but it is also causing huge loss to state exchequer. The petitions filed by some mining companies and NGO Goa Foundation are awaiting to be heard by the larger bench and the date of hearing is not fixed yet. Now, Union of India through Under Secretary of Ministry of Mines has filed an application before the Supreme Court pleading to place the Goa mining related petitions for early hearing. Union of India in it's application filed before the Supreme Court has contended that: Mine concessions under the Portuguese Colonial Mining Law was converted into mining lease under Abolition Act Till the legal issues pertaining to rights accruing to the mine concession holders are not decided, the title of the mines will not get clear Hence, directions passed by the Supreme Court would not get implemented in it's letter and sprit Stoppage of mining activity has entailed a very drastic adverse impact on the overall economy of the state It has directly affected the livelihood of mining dependents and indirect mining professionals Pendency of the matter is causing huge loss to state exchequer Any delay in adjudication of the petitions, will further perpetrate legal uncertainty in the Goa mining sector It will not be either public interest or in the interest of Goa PRUDENT MEDIA GOA | Most Popular Goa News Channel Check out latest news on Goa, Politics, Business, Cricket, Technology, Automobile, Lifestyle & Health and Travel. #Goa_news_channel #konkani_news #Konkani_Goa_News_Live_Today Subscribe on youtube ► https://goo.gl/taiJmn More on https://www.prudentmedia.in
Views: 2411 Prudent Media Goa
Foxconn: Helping Companies Like Mine
 
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Governor Walker: Hi, I’m Scott Walker. Fred: And I’m Fred Schwalbach. Governor Walker: Foxconn is the largest economic project in Wisconsin history. Fred: And It’ll help companies like mine here in Schofield. Governor Walker: Foxconn will earn tax credits based on actual investment and job creation. No jobs and investment, no credits. Alex: Merrill Steel is going to help fabricate thousands of tons of steel. That’s over two million man hours. Governor Walker: Foxconn will create 13,000 family supporting jobs across the state. Fred: And keep Wisconsin working for generations to come.
Views: 1927 Scott Walker
Mining companies in Choco, Colombia leave behind poverty and misery
 
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Afro and indigenous communities in the Choco region of Colombia are accusing the government of allowing foreign mining companies to deplete their lands of the natural resources which they depend on for their livelihood. teleSUR http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/v/denuncian-en-el-choco-saqueo-de-recursos-por-multinacionales-en/
Views: 171 TeleSUR English
Protesters block Panama highway over mining rights
 
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http://www.euronews.net/ Indigenous protesters are blockading the Pan-American Highway in Panama to demand that a mining ban in their homeland remain in place. The protest began on Monday after the government approved a series of projects in the western part of the Central American country. Indigenous people say the plans would spoil pristine rainforest areas and force their communities to relocate. The country's president, Ricardo Martinelli, said he would not be strong-armed into changing his mind.
Views: 1656 euronews (in English)