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Immunology in the Gut Mucosa
 
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The gut mucosa hosts the body's largest population of immune cells. Nature Immunology in collaboration with Arkitek Studios have produced an animation unravelling the complexities of mucosal immunology in health and disease. Nature Immunology homepage: http://www.nature.com/ni/index.html Nature has full responsibility for all editorial content, including Nature Video content. This content is editorially independent of sponsors.
Views: 416892 nature video
Part I - Mucosal Immunity
 
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http://armandoh.org/ https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 89873 Armando Hasudungan
Hungry Microbiome: The Digestive System
 
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An overview of the alimentary canal from the mouth to the oesophagus, to the stomach and small and large intestines, and finally to the rectum. Written and illustrated by Armando Hasudungan. Transcript here: https://csironewsblog.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/digestive-system.doc
Views: 11374 CSIRO
Spring 2018 ; Lecture 1 :- Microbiology 2 ; Oral microflora & staphylococci
 
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faculty of Dentistry Mti University 2016/2022 facebook.com/mtielites facebook.com/groups/epicelitesmti
General functions of gut intestinal microflora
 
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Subject:Food and Nutrition Paper: Functional foods and nutraceuticals
Views: 172 Vidya-mitra
The Invisible Universe Of The Human Microbiome
 
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The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you're more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bacteria and fungi in and on our bodies than there are human cells. But these tiny compatriots are invisible to the naked eye. So we asked artist Ben Arthur to give us a guided tour of the rich universe of the human microbiome.
Views: 518658 NPR
Human microbiota | Wikipedia audio article
 
39:59
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiota 00:01:51 1 Terminology 00:02:27 2 Relative numbers 00:03:42 3 Study 00:06:26 3.1 Shotgun Sequencing 00:06:56 3.1.1 Collection of samples and DNA extraction 00:07:35 3.1.2 Preparation of the library and sequencing 00:08:04 3.1.3 Metagenome assembly 00:08:40 3.1.4 Contig binning 00:09:22 3.1.5 Analysis after the processing 00:10:13 3.2 Marker gene analysis 00:13:09 3.3 Phylogenetic Analysis 00:14:46 4 Types 00:14:55 4.1 Bacteria 00:17:23 4.2 Archaea 00:18:07 4.3 Fungi 00:18:37 4.4 Viruses 00:19:05 5 Anatomical areas 00:19:15 5.1 Skin 00:20:43 5.2 Conjunctiva 00:21:32 5.3 Gut 00:24:33 5.4 Urethra and bladder 00:25:20 5.5 Vagina 00:26:55 5.6 Placenta 00:27:16 5.7 Uterus 00:27:44 5.8 Oral cavity 00:31:11 5.9 Lung 00:32:46 5.10 Biliary tract 00:33:22 6 Disease and death 00:33:40 6.1 Cancer 00:36:25 6.2 Inflammatory bowel disease 00:36:58 6.3 Human immunodeficiency virus 00:38:08 6.4 Death 00:38:31 7 Environmental health 00:38:55 8 Migration 00:39:22 9 See also 00:39:31 10 Bibliography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9308021918324354 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The human microbiota is the aggregate of microorganisms that resides on or within any of a number of human tissues and biofluids, including the skin, mammary glands, placenta, seminal fluid, uterus, ovarian follicles, lung, saliva, oral mucosa, conjunctiva, biliary and gastrointestinal tracts. They include bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and viruses. Though micro-animals can also live on the human body, they are typically excluded from this definition. The human microbiome refers specifically to the collective genomes of resident microorganisms.Humans are colonized by many microorganisms; the traditional estimate is that the average human body is inhabited by ten times as many non-human cells as human cells, but more recent estimates have lowered that ratio to 3:1 or even to approximately the same number. Some microorganisms that colonize humans are commensal, meaning they co-exist without harming humans; others have a mutualistic relationship with their human hosts. Conversely, some non-pathogenic microorganisms can harm human hosts via the metabolites they produce, like trimethylamine, which the human body converts to trimethylamine N-oxide via FMO3-mediated oxidation. Certain microorganisms perform tasks that are known to be useful to the human host but the role of most of them is not well understood. Those that are expected to be present, and that under normal circumstances do not cause disease, are sometimes deemed normal flora or normal microbiota.The Human Microbiome Project took on the project of sequencing the genome of the human microbiota, focusing particularly on the microbiota that normally inhabit the skin, mouth, nose, digestive tract, and vagina. It reached a milestone in 2012 when it published its initial results.
Views: 13 wikipedia tts
Salivary exRNA and a New Horizon in Dental, Oral and Craniofacial Biology
 
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David Wong of UCLA presents his work developing biomarkers for gastric cancer from salivary RNA, and more generally how to work with the microbiome-rich exRNA datasets from saliva. This web seminar was presented as part of the Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium (ERCC) seminar series on 01 March 2018.
Views: 62 Roger Alexander
Oral flora
 
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Please watch: "Chicken pox" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvWo141B-ZI -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Acridine Orange stained slide showing structure of Oral flora under Fluorescence microscopy as shown in video…
Views: 147 Microhub Plus
Gut microbiome and cholestatic liver diseases (Lukas Bajer)
 
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Lukas Bajer Gut microbiome and cholestatic liver diseases 12th INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM OF GASTROENTEROLOGY Bratislava, Slovakia, 24–26 May 2018
Human gastrointestinal tract | Wikipedia audio article
 
41:07
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastrointestinal_tract 00:03:28 1 Human gastrointestinal tract 00:03:40 1.1 Structure 00:04:08 1.1.1 Upper gastrointestinal tract 00:05:51 1.1.2 Lower gastrointestinal tract 00:06:52 1.1.2.1 Small intestine 00:09:07 1.1.2.2 Large intestine 00:10:34 1.1.3 Development 00:12:44 1.1.4 Histology 00:13:22 1.1.4.1 Mucosa 00:14:39 1.1.4.2 Submucosa 00:15:13 1.1.4.3 Muscular layer 00:17:28 1.1.4.4 Adventitia and serosa 00:18:51 1.1.5 Gene and protein expression 00:20:09 1.2 Function 00:20:59 1.2.1 Immune function 00:21:08 1.2.1.1 Immune barrier 00:22:52 1.2.1.2 Immune system homeostasis 00:24:12 1.2.2 Intestinal microbiota 00:25:44 1.2.3 Detoxification and drug metabolism 00:26:13 2 Clinical significance 00:26:23 2.1 Diseases 00:29:19 2.2 Symptoms 00:30:03 2.3 Treatment 00:30:38 2.4 Imaging 00:31:42 2.5 Other related diseases 00:36:47 3 Uses of animal guts 00:39:53 4 Other animals 00:40:42 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7400655406457507 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The gastrointestinal tract (digestive tract, digestional tract, GI tract, GIT, gut, or alimentary canal) is an organ system within humans and other animals which takes in food, digests it to extract and absorb energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste as feces. The mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are part of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal is an adjective meaning of or pertaining to the stomach and intestines. A tract is a collection of related anatomic structures or a series of connected body organs. All bilaterians have a gastrointestinal tract, also called a gut or an alimentary canal. This is a tube that transfers food to the organs of digestion. In large bilaterians, the gastrointestinal tract generally also has an exit, the anus, by which the animal disposes of feces (solid wastes). Some small bilaterians have no anus and dispose of solid wastes by other means (for example, through the mouth). The human gastrointestinal tract consists of the esophagus, stomach, and intestines, and is divided into the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. The GI tract includes all structures between the mouth and the anus, forming a continuous passageway that includes the main organs of digestion, namely, the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. However, the complete human digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal tract plus the accessory organs of digestion (the tongue, salivary glands, pancreas, liver and gallbladder). The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment. The whole human GI tract is about nine metres (30 feet) long at autopsy. It is considerably shorter in the living body because the intestines, which are tubes of smooth muscle tissue, maintain constant muscle tone in a halfway-tense state but can relax in spots to allow for local distention and peristalsis.The gastrointestinal tract contains trillions of microbes, with some 4,000 different strains of bacteria having diverse roles in maintenance of immune health and metabolism. Cells of the GI tract release hormones to help regulate the digestive process. These digestive hormones, including gastrin, secretin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin, are mediated through either intracrine or autocrine mechanisms, indicating that the cells releasing these hormones are conserved structures throughout evolution.
Views: 10 wikipedia tts
Dental Caries ( Cavities )
 
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Brief description of dental caries ( Cavities )
Views: 53 DentalPodCast
Oral microbiology - Everything Dentistry 🍎👄🔊✅
 
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This video is about "Oral microbiology". This video series is something special. We're fully delving into all things everything and all things about Dentistry!!! Link to Amazon.com http://amzn.to/2hFyI1h Here's a couple demonstration models for dentistry http://amzn.to/2CVOwFi http://amzn.to/2oG7awG Here's another http://amzn.to/2oFcEYs Here's some wall charts for dentistry http://amzn.to/2oG7fAu http://amzn.to/2FUq4HD And here's SONICAIRE and SENSODYNE The best toothcare comibination Brush: http://amzn.to/2oFYTZu Paste: http://amzn.to/2FmEB0H Floss: http://amzn.to/2oG7J9M Swish: http://amzn.to/2F95dTM Link above take you to amazon and then amazon kicks me some money for alerting you to some awesome goods. We thank you for clicking the links. THANK for WATCHING, SUBSCRIBING, LIKING, COMMENTING, SHARING and DONATING!!! It means a lot to my family! PLEASE DONATE via VENMO for MORE EDUCATIONAL CONTENT and ENDEAVORS https://venmo.com/SeeHearSayLearn SeeHearSayLearn.com presents a series of videos to get you speaking and learning languages such as English, Spanish / Espanol, French, German, Albanian, Arabic, and more. We are working hard to get our videos uploaded. We provide you with word pronunciations, definitions, translations, stories, rhymes, riddles, jokes, tongue twisters, and anything that will help bridge the gap between your current fluency to your desired proficiency and understanding. Whether you're just learning or trying to bolster your intellectual quotient into a new stratosphere of concise and succinct communications, allocating the proper verbiage could be paramount to illustrating a picture for the recipient or merely shoving drab nondescript sounds of failure down their auditory meatuses. Run on sentence you say? I'd agree. Utilizing big complicated words isn't usually the most effective form of communication, but adapting your language to your recipient will be the most effective way to transfer your thoughts. Having a wide array of tools for each project will allow you to tailor your message for the most effect and efficient use of your time. To write, read, and listen to language takes fewer words than you might imagine. In each language, you could likely get away with understanding a few thousand words and be completely comfortable with many different language settings. Why even a few hundred can get you quite far. If ever you find any of the words to be inaccurate in any way, which may most often be the pronunciation I want to thank anyone who reaches out to send me a message regarding any errors. I will do my best to read and correct any perceived errors. Be advised that many pronunciation can vary slightly between regions. My congratulations to anyone broadening their word bank in any language. Science is clear that with more word associations languages become easier to learn and has the potential to be a protective buffer against dementia and Alzheimer's Disease. Please visit www.seehearsaylearn.com FACEBOOK FOLLOW https://www.facebook.com/seehearsaylearn TWITTER FOLLOW https://www.twitter.com/seehearsaylearn YOUTUBE SUBSCRIBE https://www.youtube.com/c/SeeHearSayLearn PLEASE DONATE via VENMO for MORE EDUCATIONAL CONTENT and ENDEAVORS https://venmo.com/SeeHearSayLearn THANK for WATCHING, SUBSCRIBING, LIKING, COMMENTING, SHARING and DONATING!!! It means a lot to my family! This video series couldn't do what it does without the help of Wikipedia and its community along with so many other people to thank.
Views: 462 See Hear Say Learn
Gastrointestinal tract | Wikipedia audio article
 
36:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastrointestinal_tract 00:03:01 1 Human gastrointestinal tract 00:03:12 1.1 Structure 00:03:38 1.1.1 Upper gastrointestinal tract 00:05:09 1.1.2 Lower gastrointestinal tract 00:06:03 1.1.2.1 Small intestine 00:08:02 1.1.2.2 Large intestine 00:09:22 1.1.3 Development 00:11:15 1.1.4 Histology 00:11:50 1.1.4.1 Mucosa 00:13:00 1.1.4.2 Submucosa 00:13:31 1.1.4.3 Muscular layer 00:15:30 1.1.4.4 Adventitia and serosa 00:16:43 1.1.5 Gene and protein expression 00:17:52 1.2 Function 00:18:38 1.2.1 Immune function 00:18:46 1.2.1.1 Immune barrier 00:20:18 1.2.1.2 Immune system homeostasis 00:21:29 1.2.2 Intestinal microbiota 00:22:51 1.2.3 Detoxification and drug metabolism 00:23:18 2 Clinical significance 00:23:28 2.1 Diseases 00:26:01 2.2 Symptoms 00:26:41 2.3 Treatment 00:27:13 2.4 Imaging 00:28:11 2.5 Other related diseases 00:32:41 3 Uses of animal guts 00:35:24 4 Other animals 00:36:08 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7068006327290152 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The gastrointestinal tract (digestive tract, digestional tract, GI tract, GIT, gut, or alimentary canal) is an organ system within humans and other animals which takes in food, digests it to extract and absorb energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste as feces. The mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are part of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal is an adjective meaning of or pertaining to the stomach and intestines. A tract is a collection of related anatomic structures or a series of connected body organs. All bilaterians have a gastrointestinal tract, also called a gut or an alimentary canal. This is a tube that transfers food to the organs of digestion. In large bilaterians, the gastrointestinal tract generally also has an exit, the anus, by which the animal disposes of feces (solid wastes). Some small bilaterians have no anus and dispose of solid wastes by other means (for example, through the mouth). The human gastrointestinal tract consists of the esophagus, stomach, and intestines, and is divided into the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. The GI tract includes all structures between the mouth and the anus, forming a continuous passageway that includes the main organs of digestion, namely, the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. However, the complete human digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal tract plus the accessory organs of digestion (the tongue, salivary glands, pancreas, liver and gallbladder). The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment. The whole human GI tract is about nine metres (30 feet) long at autopsy. It is considerably shorter in the living body because the intestines, which are tubes of smooth muscle tissue, maintain constant muscle tone in a halfway-tense state but can relax in spots to allow for local distention and peristalsis.The gastrointestinal tract contains trillions of microbes, with some 4,000 different strains of bacteria having diverse roles in maintenance of immune health and metabolism. Cells of the GI tract release hormones to help regulate the digestive process. These digestive hormones, including gastrin, secretin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin, are mediated through either intracrine or autocrine mechanisms, indicating that the cells releasing these hormones are conserved structures throughout evolution.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Immunology in the Gut Mucosa
 
06:51
The gut mucosa is the largest and most dynamic immunological environment of the body. It's often the first point of pathogen exposure and many microbes use it as a beachhead into the rest of the body. The gut immune system therefore needs to be ready to respond to pathogens but at the same time it is constantly exposed to innocuous environmental antigens, food particles and commensal microflora which need to be tolerated. Misdirected immune responses to harmless antigens are the underlying cause of food allergies and debilitating conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. This animation introduces the key cells and molecular players involved in gut immunohomeostasis and disease.
Views: 6888 Jason B
11 11 2016 7 34 01 AM mucous membranes; muscle
 
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Mucous membranes; fascia; skeletal muscle tissue Dual Credit Anatomy and Physiology Porter High School Porter, TX Dr. Bartlett
Views: 5 John Bartlett
Human microbiome | Wikipedia audio article
 
42:52
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_microbiota 00:01:58 1 Terminology 00:02:37 2 Relative numbers 00:03:55 3 Study 00:06:50 3.1 Shotgun Sequencing 00:07:23 3.1.1 Collection of samples and DNA extraction 00:08:05 3.1.2 Preparation of the library and sequencing 00:08:36 3.1.3 Metagenome assembly 00:09:15 3.1.4 Contig binning 00:09:59 3.1.5 Analysis after the processing 00:10:53 3.2 Marker gene analysis 00:14:02 3.3 Phylogenetic Analysis 00:15:46 4 Types 00:15:55 4.1 Bacteria 00:18:34 4.2 Archaea 00:19:21 4.3 Fungi 00:19:53 4.4 Viruses 00:20:23 5 Anatomical areas 00:20:33 5.1 Skin 00:22:07 5.2 Conjunctiva 00:22:59 5.3 Gut 00:26:13 5.4 Urethra and bladder 00:27:04 5.5 Vagina 00:28:47 5.6 Placenta 00:29:08 5.7 Uterus 00:29:39 5.8 Oral cavity 00:33:24 5.9 Lung 00:35:06 5.10 Biliary tract 00:35:45 6 Disease and death 00:36:05 6.1 Cancer 00:39:00 6.2 Inflammatory bowel disease 00:39:36 6.3 Human immunodeficiency virus 00:40:51 6.4 Death 00:41:19 7 Environmental health 00:41:45 8 Migration 00:42:14 9 See also 00:42:23 10 Bibliography Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.873621949970991 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The human microbiota is the aggregate of microorganisms that resides on or within any of a number of human tissues and biofluids, including the skin, mammary glands, placenta, seminal fluid, uterus, ovarian follicles, lung, saliva, oral mucosa, conjunctiva, biliary and gastrointestinal tracts. They include bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists and viruses. Though micro-animals can also live on the human body, they are typically excluded from this definition. The human microbiome refers specifically to the collective genomes of resident microorganisms.Humans are colonized by many microorganisms; the traditional estimate is that the average human body is inhabited by ten times as many non-human cells as human cells, but more recent estimates have lowered that ratio to 3:1 or even to approximately the same number. Some microorganisms that colonize humans are commensal, meaning they co-exist without harming humans; others have a mutualistic relationship with their human hosts. Conversely, some non-pathogenic microorganisms can harm human hosts via the metabolites they produce, like trimethylamine, which the human body converts to trimethylamine N-oxide via FMO3-mediated oxidation. Certain microorganisms perform tasks that are known to be useful to the human host but the role of most of them is not well understood. Those that are expected to be present, and that under normal circumstances do not cause disease, are sometimes deemed normal flora or normal microbiota.The Human Microbiome Project took on the project of sequencing the genome of the human microbiota, focusing particularly on the microbiota that normally inhabit the skin, mouth, nose, digestive tract, and vagina. It reached a milestone in 2012 when it published its initial results.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
SINUS MICROBIOME LOSES DIVERSITY, THAT SNOT GOOD!
 
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http://www.yourekascience.com/Sinus_Microbiome_Loses_Diversity.html Learn about how the diversity of your microbiome can affect your health in this interesting study of chronic sinusitis. For more fun science videos, visit www.yourekascience.com Connect with us! Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/YourekaScience !! Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/YourekaScience !! Original article: Sinus Microbiome Diversity Depletion and Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum Enrichment Mediates Rhinosinusitis Abreu, Nagalingam et al. Sci. Transl. Med. 4, 151ra124 (2012).
Views: 910 YourekaScience
Hungry Microbiome: Gut Microbiome
 
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An animated overview of the human gut microbiome: the community of microbes in our insides. This video describes the various species of microbe that inhabit our digestive system and expounds their roles in digestion. Written and illustrated by Armando Hasudungan. The transcript can be found here: https://csironewsblog.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/gut-microbiome.doc
Views: 6093 CSIRO
Mucous Membrane 26-09-2013 01
 
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Presentación en Ciudad Universitaria. Set-list: - Surfin' Bird - I Wanna Be Sedated - Breaking The Law - Anarchy In The UK - A Tout Le Monde - Happy Birthday - Should I Stay Or Should I Go?
Views: 491 Bruno Díaz
15. MICROBIOTA INTESTINAL [] ¿qué tanto conoces?
 
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GLOSARIO - Probióticos: microorganismos vivos que ejercen una acción benéfica sobre la salud del huésped al ser administrado en cantidades adecuadas. - Prebióticos: ingredientes alimenticios no digeribles de los alimentos que afectan de manera positiva a la salud, estimulando de forma selectiva el crecimiento y/o la actividad de un número limitado de bacterias colónicas. - Ácidos grasos de cadena corta: Moléculas producidas en el aparato gastrointestinal, en particular en el colon, por la fermentación de la fibra dietética por parte de la microbiota intestinal. - Aterosclerosis: Acumulación de colesterol, calcio y otras sustancias dentro de las arterias, la cual con el tiempo produce endurecimiento y estrechamiento de las mismas. - Síndrome de intestino irritable: Grupo de síntomas que se presentan juntos, que incluyen dolor constante en el abdomen y cambios en las evacuaciones de las heces como diarrea, estreñimiento o ambos. - Cáncer colorrectal: A menudo comienza como crecimiento, llamado pólipo en el colon o en el recto - Tubo digestivo: Conducto formado por la boca, el esófago, estómago, los intestinos, hasta el ano. - Insulina: Hormona producida por el páncreas que se encarga de regular el metabolismo de ciertos nutrimentos, sobre todo el de los glúcidos. ————— ————— ————— ————— ————— ————— ————— FUENTES: Fomento de nutrición y salud, A.C. (2017). La microbiota, los probioticos y los productos lácteos. Cuadernos de nutrición, 40, 2,80-81. Diccionario terminológico de ciencias médicas. (1992). Barcelona: ediciones científicas y técnicas Francisco Recio Del Bosque. (2009). Química Orgánica. México, D.F.: Mc Graw Hill. ————— ————— ————— ————— ————— ————— ————— Somos Jorge Méndez y Erick Navarrete, tus “Nutriólogos de cabecera”. FACEBOOK: https://m.facebook.com/NutriologosDeC... CONTACTO DE NEGOCIOS: [email protected]
Gastrointestinal | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastrointestinal_tract 00:02:36 1 Human gastrointestinal tract 00:02:46 1.1 Structure 00:03:09 1.1.1 Upper gastrointestinal tract 00:04:29 1.1.2 Lower gastrointestinal tract 00:05:16 1.1.2.1 Small intestine 00:07:01 1.1.2.2 Large intestine 00:08:08 1.1.3 Development 00:09:48 1.1.4 Histology 00:10:18 1.1.4.1 Mucosa 00:11:19 1.1.4.2 Submucosa 00:11:46 1.1.4.3 Muscular layer 00:13:30 1.1.4.4 Adventitia and serosa 00:14:35 1.1.5 Gene and protein expression 00:15:36 1.2 Function 00:16:16 1.2.1 Immune function 00:16:24 1.2.1.1 Immune barrier 00:17:44 1.2.1.2 Immune system homeostasis 00:18:47 1.2.2 Intestinal microbiota 00:19:59 1.2.3 Detoxification and drug metabolism 00:20:22 2 Clinical significance 00:20:32 2.1 Diseases 00:22:46 2.2 Symptoms 00:23:21 2.3 Treatment 00:23:50 2.4 Imaging 00:24:41 2.5 Other related diseases 00:28:31 3 Uses of animal guts 00:30:55 4 Other animals 00:31:34 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9775801710136599 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The gastrointestinal tract (digestive tract, digestional tract, GI tract, GIT, gut, or alimentary canal) is an organ system within humans and other animals which takes in food, digests it to extract and absorb energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste as feces. The mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are part of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal is an adjective meaning of or pertaining to the stomach and intestines. A tract is a collection of related anatomic structures or a series of connected body organs. All bilaterians have a gastrointestinal tract, also called a gut or an alimentary canal. This is a tube that transfers food to the organs of digestion. In large bilaterians, the gastrointestinal tract generally also has an exit, the anus, by which the animal disposes of feces (solid wastes). Some small bilaterians have no anus and dispose of solid wastes by other means (for example, through the mouth). The human gastrointestinal tract consists of the esophagus, stomach, and intestines, and is divided into the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts. The GI tract includes all structures between the mouth and the anus, forming a continuous passageway that includes the main organs of digestion, namely, the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine. However, the complete human digestive system is made up of the gastrointestinal tract plus the accessory organs of digestion (the tongue, salivary glands, pancreas, liver and gallbladder). The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment. The whole human GI tract is about nine metres (30 feet) long at autopsy. It is considerably shorter in the living body because the intestines, which are tubes of smooth muscle tissue, maintain constant muscle tone in a halfway-tense state but can relax in spots to allow for local distention and peristalsis.The gastrointestinal tract contains trillions of microbes, with some 4,000 different strains of bacteria having diverse roles in maintenance of immune health and metabolism. Cells of the GI tract release hormones to help regulate the digestive process. These digestive hormones, including gastrin, secretin, cholecystokinin, and ghrelin, are mediated through either intracrine or autocrine mechanisms, indicating that the cells releasing these hormones are conserved structures throughout evolution.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Capacitación Patología Oral, Calama 2015 (1)
 
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Introducción y primera parte del Curso de Capacitación en Patología Oral. Organización y logística: Colegio de Dentistas filial Calama. www.rodrigofuentespatologiaoral.cl
Adopt A Medical Model of Caries Risk Assessment and Treatment
 
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Presented by Oral Biotech CEO Kim Kutsch, DMD For more information about AIM Dental Marketing, visit our website at http://www.AmericanDentalMarketing.com
Immunology Lecture Mini-Course, 11 of 14: Mucosal Immunity
 
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http://www.einstein.yu.edu - Immunology Lecture 11 of 14: "Mucosal Immunity." Harris Goldstein, M.D., director, Einstein-Montefiore Center for AIDS Research, professor of pediatrics and microbiology & immunology and the Charles Michael Chair in Autoimmune Diseases, delivers a mini-course that provides a comprehensive overview in basic immunology for graduate and medical students and for anyone interested in understanding how the immune system works. This mini-course was organized by the KwaZulu-Natal Research Institute for Tuberculosis and HIV (K-RITH) at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa to provide Sub-Saharan students, research trainees and HIV and TB investigators with a comprehensive course in immunology. (January 2010). See related lecture slides at: http://streaming.einstein.yu.edu/docs/conferences/immunologycourseinsouthafrica/L-11-Goldstein-mucosal-immunity.pdf
Development of classification of periodontal disease - Periodontics
 
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PERIODONTICS VIDEOS: (Subscribe for more) 1. Introduction to Periodontology - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=NUYvcIVXAUE 2. Toothbrush - Parts, Types and Techniques - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=Hz2PVUyando 3. Chlorhexidine Mouthwash - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=7fpxCx8acig 4. CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES AND CONDITIONS AFFECTING PERIODONTIUM - PERIODONTICS https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=Pe41gSne11A 5. Development of classification of periodontal disease - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=O7O4MfgsFSg 6. Periodontium - Periodontology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=QuSJlQdOoko 7. Microbiology of Periodontal Diseases https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoyR3DzifIE 8. Bacterial Virulence and chemical mediators in inflammation of periodontal disease https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBRY2EksJmw 9. Periodontal disease - Periodontology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGa2RrCPbyo 10. PERIODONTAL MEDICINE - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RU1x4Dpg8eY 11. Ultrasonic and Sonic Instruments For Scaling - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y08Asc6aE2Q 12. Periodontal examination, diagnosis and prognosis - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MnCVlhfQW1g 13. Plaque and Plaque control - Periodontics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQuXpncyCT0 14. Biofilm and Dental Plaque - Periodontology https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tmls19inrVI 15. Dental Anatomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKKIj9cX29c WATCH ORAL PATHOLOGY VIDEOS (Look descriptions of) Amelogenesis - Formation of Enamel on Tooth - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=9hfA3zSG820 ORTHODONTICS VIDEOS (Read descriptions) 1. Orthodontic Treatment Considerations in case of Diabetes Mellitus https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=-7UR5KGydxM Pedodontics Videos: 2. THUMB AND DIGIT SUCKING THEORIES - ORTHODONTICS https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=pc2-MPQ0580 1. BRUSHING TECHNIQUES IN CHILDREN - PEDODONTICS https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=yyQyXq-4zi8 CONSERVATIVE AND ENDODONTICS 1. Rationale of Endodontic Treatment - Conservative and Endodontics https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=czJMW34AeI0 2. Preventive Resins Restorations - Conservative and Endodontics https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=onliQ_amhww ORAL PATHOLOGY 1. Odontogenic Keratocyst - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=_0JtFKjsIqo 2. Leukoedema - White and Red Lesions of Oral Mucosa - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=uqFJZJcV7Rs 3. Development of Palate and It's Blood Supply - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=dRsjQH9cudo 4. Caries Activity Test - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=iBTANnYOEUQ 5. Streptococcus Mutans and Dental Caries - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=yC4EJeGcyVI 6. Taste Buds and Taste Pathway - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=j8ytLN0Omo4 7. HEALING OF EXTRACTION SOCKET - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=S47iqHmWo7I 8. Neural Crest Cells - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=XNI2hYtpbeQ 9. Tobacco and it's Effects on Oral Cavity - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=cibaEHzkgGs 10. Hypomineralized Structure of Dentin - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=Fw_AdCg20-E 11. Development of Mandible & Its Blood Supply - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=g3S5TaN5oRQ 12. Development of Tongue and Papillae - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=tGmXUWn2NMQ 13. Dentinogenesis - Formation of Dentin on Tooth - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=BJcB9ACSf0c 14. Amelogenesis - Formation of Enamel on Tooth - Oral Pathology https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=9hfA3zSG820
Views: 158 Dental Guide
Gut microbiota | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gut_flora 00:00:28 1 Overview 00:02:39 2 Classifications 00:06:33 2.1 Enterotype 00:07:10 3 Composition 00:07:20 3.1 Anatomy 00:07:29 3.1.1 Stomach 00:08:13 3.1.2 Intestines 00:11:56 3.2 Age 00:13:08 3.3 Diet 00:14:49 3.4 Geography 00:17:33 4 Acquisition in human infants 00:22:04 5 Functions 00:22:48 5.1 Direct inhibition of pathogens 00:23:29 5.2 Development of enteric protection and immune system 00:27:43 5.3 Metabolism 00:29:54 5.4 Host-gut microbiota-xenobiotic interaction 00:30:32 5.5 Gut-brain axis 00:32:06 6 Alterations in flora balance 00:32:18 6.1 Effects of antibiotic use 00:35:35 6.2 Pregnancy 00:36:15 6.3 Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, and pharmabiotics 00:38:27 6.4 Research 00:39:00 7 Role in disease 00:39:54 7.1 Ulcers 00:40:42 7.2 Bowel perforation 00:41:18 7.3 Inflammatory bowel diseases 00:42:54 7.4 Irritable bowel syndrome 00:43:55 7.5 Other inflammatory or autoimmune conditions 00:44:35 7.5.1 Asthma 00:46:17 7.5.2 Diabetes mellitus type 1 00:47:02 7.6 Obesity and metabolic syndrome 00:49:58 7.7 Liver disease 00:50:31 7.8 Cancer 00:51:12 7.9 Neuropsychiatric 00:53:03 8 Other animals 00:55:24 9 See also 00:55:52 10 Sources and notes 00:56:03 11 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7885852104460678 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Gut flora, or gut microbiota, or gastrointestinal microbiota, is the complex community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tracts of humans and other animals, including insects. The gut metagenome is the aggregate of all the genomes of gut microbiota. The gut is one niche that human microbiota inhabit.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
20150429 124603
 
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oral pathology microscopic slides pt2
Views: 332 Omar Abd El Aleem
Diseases of the GI Tract - ATSU PA c/o 2013
 
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PA-502.06.03a: Describe the anatomy of the GI tract wall PA-502.06.03b: Describe the physiologic changes seen with Hirschprung's disease, Peptic ulcer disease and celiac sprue
Views: 595 ambermunns
Histologia Módulo 6 - Tonsilas, Placa de Peyer...
 
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-- Created using Powtoon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 22 Barbara Borges
Webinar: Human Skin Microflora: DNA Sequence-Based Approach to Examining Hand Disease
 
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October 15, 2009. The skin creates a barrier between the body and the environment. Using animal models, Dr. Julie Segre's laboratory focuses on the genetic pathways involved in building and repairing this skin barrier. The Segre laboratory estimates that approximately one million bacteria reside on each square centimeter of skin and many common skin conditions are associated with both impaired skin barrier function and increased microbial colonization. Dr. Segre moderated the discussion, answered questions and addressed comments. In addition, the webinar discussed details of the Human Microbiome Project. More: http://www.genome.gov/27535715
The Lung Microbiome: Challenging Old Paradigms about Microbes... - Gary Huffnagle
 
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July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404
Gut flora | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gut_flora 00:00:20 1 Overview 00:01:55 2 Classifications 00:04:41 2.1 Enterotype 00:05:09 3 Composition 00:05:18 3.1 Anatomy 00:05:26 3.1.1 Stomach 00:05:59 3.1.2 Intestines 00:08:39 3.2 Age 00:09:33 3.3 Diet 00:10:24 3.3.1 Vegetarian and Vegan Diets 00:11:41 3.3.2 Malnourishment 00:12:14 3.4 Geography 00:14:13 4 Acquisition in human infants 00:17:26 5 Functions 00:17:59 5.1 Direct inhibition of pathogens 00:18:30 5.2 Development of enteric protection and immune system 00:21:31 5.3 Metabolism 00:23:06 5.4 Host-gut microbiota-xenobiotic interaction 00:23:35 5.5 Gut-brain axis 00:24:44 6 Alterations in flora balance 00:24:54 6.1 Effects of antibiotic use 00:27:14 6.2 Pregnancy 00:27:44 6.3 Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, and pharmabiotics 00:29:18 6.4 Research 00:29:43 7 Role in disease 00:30:23 7.1 Ulcers 00:30:59 7.2 Bowel perforation 00:31:27 7.3 Inflammatory bowel diseases 00:32:37 7.4 Irritable bowel syndrome 00:33:23 7.5 Other inflammatory or autoimmune conditions 00:33:53 7.5.1 Asthma 00:35:06 7.5.2 Diabetes mellitus type 1 00:35:40 7.6 Obesity and metabolic syndrome 00:37:48 7.7 Liver disease 00:38:14 7.8 Cancer 00:38:44 7.9 Neuropsychiatric 00:40:04 8 Other animals 00:41:46 9 See also 00:42:09 10 Sources and notes 00:42:18 11 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9561487941795885 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Gut flora, or gut microbiota, or gastrointestinal microbiota, is the complex community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tracts of humans and animals, including insects. The gut metagenome is the aggregate of all the genomes of gut microbiota. The gut is one niche that human microbiota inhabit.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
For Heart Health, Look to the Gut
 
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www.dailyrnews.com The tiny microbes living in your digestive system may actually have a big impact on the health of your heart. A new study from the Netherlands found that gut bacteria may affect a patients’s weight, body fat and cholesterol levels — factors all necessary for optimum heart health. "Our study provides new evidence that microbes in the gut are strongly linked to the blood level of HDL (good cholesterol) and triglycerides and may be added as a new risk factor for abnormal blood lipids, in addition to age, gender, BMI and genetics," said lead study author Jingyuan Fu, PhD, an associate professor of genetics at University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands, in a press release. The digestive system and gut bacteria have a symbiotic relationship. The trillions of microbes present in the gut help the body digest food and train the immune system to fight against harmful bacteria.
Views: 68 dailyRx
SPARC Strategic Planning Workshop: Biology & Technology (Day 2)
 
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SPARC Strategic Planning Workshop: Biology & Technology (Day 2) Air date: Thursday, February 26, 2015, 8:00:00 AM Category: Advisory Board Meetings Runtime: 04:17:09 Description: The SPARC Biology and Technology Workshop bring together disparate research communities to assess the following: ? The current status of functional and anatomical mapping of peripheral innervation in organs. The opportunities for additional knowledge and technologies that would be foundational for understanding neuronal control of organ and organ system function in animal models and humans. Furthermore, this workshop will help elucidate technical and biological opportunities within and across communities in a variety of organs and conditions. For more information go to http://www.scgcorp.com/sparc2015/Default Author: NIH-OD/DPCPSI/Office of Strategic Coordination Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18870
Views: 840 nihvcast
Sialolithiasis
 
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Sialolithiasis (also termed salivary calculi, or salivary stones), is a condition where a calcified mass forms within a salivary gland, usually in the duct of the submandibular gland (also termed "Wharton's duct"). Less commonly the parotid gland or rarely the sublingual gland or a minor salivary gland may develop salivary stones. The usual symptoms are pain and swelling of the affected salivary gland, both of which get worse when salivary flow is stimulated, e.g. with the sight, thought, smell or taste of food, or with hunger or chewing. This is often termed "mealtime syndrome". Inflammation or infection of the gland may develop as a result. Sialolithiasis may also develop because of the presence of existing chronic infection of the glands, dehydration (e.g. use of phenothiazines), Sjögren's syndrome and/or increased local levels of calcium, but in many instances the cause is idiopathic (unknown). This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 4261 Audiopedia
Angular cheilitis
 
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Angular cheilitis, (pronounced /kaɪˈlaɪtɪs/, sometimes abbreviated to AC, and also called perlèche, cheilosis, angular cheilosis, commissural cheilitis, or angular stomatitis), is inflammation of one, or more commonly both, of the corners of the mouth. It is a type of cheilitis (inflammation of the lips). Angular cheilitis often represents an opportunistic infection of fungi and/or bacteria, with multiple local and systemic predisposing factors being involved in the initiation and persistence of the lesion. Such factors include nutritional deficiencies, overclosure of the mouth, dry mouth, a lip-licking habit, drooling, immunosuppression, and others. Treatment for angular cheilitis varies based on the exact causes of the condition in each case, but often an antifungal cream is used among other measures. It is a fairly common problem, and is more prevalent in people without any natural teeth who wear dentures, and in elderly people, although it may also occur in children. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 381 Audiopedia
David Relman speaking at the Genbank 25th Anniversary
 
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David Relman Associate Professor of Medicine and of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Why You Are Never Alone at Night: Human-Microbial Symbiosis
Views: 4414 NCBI
Microbial symbiosis and immunity | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microbial_symbiosis_and_immunity 00:01:53 1 General principles 00:02:48 2 In the gastrointestinal tract 00:04:33 2.1 Regulation of immune responses 00:06:42 2.2 Development of isolated lymphoid tissues 00:08:36 2.3 Protection against pathogens 00:09:02 2.3.1 Immunoglobulin A 00:11:21 2.3.2 Antimicrobial peptides 00:13:54 2.3.3 Fortification fucose 00:14:49 3 On the epidermis 00:15:59 4 Role in disease 00:16:35 4.1 Cancer 00:17:39 4.2 Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 00:20:02 4.3 Obesity Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7238050180124337 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= There are close and often long-term relationships between symbiotic microbes and their host's immune system. The immune system is a host defense system consisting of anatomical barriers, and physiological and cellular responses, which protect the host against harmful parasites while limiting inflammation by tolerating harmless symbionts. Humans are home to 1013 to 1014 bacteria. These bacteria can have almost any kind of relationship with the host, including mutually beneficial in a host's gut, or parasitic. Microbes can promote the development of the host's immune system in the gut and skin, and may help to prevent pathogens from invading. Some release anti-inflammatory products, protecting against parasitic gut microbes. Commensals promote the development of B cells that produce a protective antibody, Immunoglobulin A (IgA). This can neutralize pathogens and exotoxins, and promote the development of TH17 and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Microbes trigger development of isolated lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, which are sites of mucosal immune response. Microbes can prevent growth of harmful pathogens by altering pH, consuming nutrients required for pathogen survival, and secreting toxins that inhibit growth of pathogens. However, microbes have been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and cancer.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts