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WA increases mining royalties
 
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The WA Government has hiked up iron ore royalties in its budget which has created an almost $2 billion black hole for the Federal Government.
Explore the Future of Mining | Customer Interviews & Machine Overview
 
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Interviews with Komatsu customers on the business relationships we build. There is also an overview on machines for mining applications. http://www.smsequip.com
Views: 488 SMS Equipment
Bringing them home: separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families
 
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This documentary DVD was produced in 1997 and forms part of the Bringing them home education resource for use in Australian classrooms. For more on the report see: https://bth.humanrights.gov.au/ This resource is based on 'Bringing them home' , the report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, and on the history of forcible separation and other policies which have impacted on the lives of Indigenous Australians. This documentary complements a collection of curriculum-linked activities and teaching resources, plus a range of photographs, maps and diagrams, timelines, legal texts and glossaries. The Australian Human Rights Commission invites teachers and students to use this resource to explore, understand and reflect on one of the most difficult chapters of our national history and to engage with some of the key concepts involved in the reconciliation debate in Australia. For the education resource see: https://www.humanrights.gov.au/education/human-rights-school-classroom Warning: This video may contain images / voices of deceased Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons. Video produced by Oziris. © Australian Human Rights Commission
Which primary industry occupations in Newfoundland and Labrador have the best outlook?
 
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416-962-2623 / 1-866-760-2623 http://www.aes.gov.nl.ca/publications/LMOutlook2020.pdf http://immigroup.com/ Which primary industry occupations in Newfoundland and Labrador have the best outlook? The following primary industry occupations in Newfoundland and Labrador are expected to have the best outlook until the end of 2015: • Supervisors, mining, oil and gas; • Underground miners, oil and gas drillers; • Mineservice workers and operators in oil and gas drilling; • Primary production labourers. The Newfoundland and Labrador labour market conditions are subject to changes. This video was current as of October, 2013. Visit our website at immigroup.com. Re Quality and Feedback email [email protected] (Please reference Research and Development) Did you catch a mistake? Are you looking for answers we don't have? Email us and we'll make a video. Have any feedback to make this even better?
Views: 101 Immigroup Inc
Bebe Rexha - I Can't Stop Drinking About You [Official Music Video]
 
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Check out the official music video for Bebe Rexha's "I Can't Stop Drinking About You"! Bebe Rexha's "I Don't Wanna Grow Up" EP is available now on iTunes! Download it here: smarturl.it/IDontWannaGrowUpEP LISTEN Available on iTunes: http://bit.ly/1ouIvWw Available on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/ICSDAYSpotify CONNECT WITH BEBE Offical Website: http://www.beberexha.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Beberexha Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BEBEREXHA Instagram: http://instagram.com/beberexha Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/BEBEREXHA Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/beberexha LYRICS No ones gonna love you like I do. No ones gonna care like I do. And I can feel it in the way that you breathe. I know you dream of her while you sleep next to me. I can't stop drinking about you. I gotta numb the pain. I can't stop drinking about you. Without you I ain't the same. So pour a shot in my glass and I'll forget forever! So pour a shot in my glass cause it makes everything better! Darlin tell me what more can I do? Don't you know that I was meant for you? You say I feel like heaven on earth, But You'd never know what heaven was if it wasn't for... her. I can't stop drinking about you. I gotta numb the pain. I can't stop drinking about you. Without you I ain't the same. So pour a shot in my glass and I'll forget forever! So pour a shot in my glass cause it makes everything better! I can't stop drinking about you. I can't stop drinking about you. No ones gonna love you like I do. I can't stop drinking about you. I can't stop drinking about you. So pour a shot in my glass and I'll forget forever! So pour a shot in my glass cause it makes everything better! No ones gonna love you like I do.
Views: 20064170 Bebe Rexha
Barriers to Access to Justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women
 
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As First Nation Peoples, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders have a singular place in Australia. However, a history of violence, dispossession and social exclusion experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has contributed to their over-representation in the criminal justice system and almost every other measure of social and economic disadvantage. This short film outlines some of the barriers Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders women face when accessing the justice system. Some of the barriers identified affect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women exclusively; others are issues that affect many women experiencing family violence. However, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women may experience them more acutely because of trauma, racism, adversity and disadvantage, language barriers, cultural differences and social exclusion. For further information on barriers to access to justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders women, refer to the JCCD Consultation Report - The Path to Justice: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders Women Experience of the Courts which be accessed at www.jccd.org.au/publications For information about the JCCD, visit www.jccd.org.au or contact the Secretariat: [email protected] +61 2 6162 0361 PO Box 1895 Canberra ACT 2601 Australia
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part One)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies. This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Global WINConference | Creating History - Zoë Yujnovich (Australia / Canada)
 
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President & CEO of Iron Ore Company of Canada shares her career path and women's leadership in organisations in Plenary Session: Creating the Career of the Future Influential leaders and outstanding professionals shared their stories, and illuminated new options, strategies and life practices. Here, President and CEO Iron Ore Company of Canada IOC and former President & CEO of Rio Tinto shares some of her strategies for success WIN-Womens Intl Networking Conference & Global Leadership Forum www.winconference.net
Residential School Survivor Personal Stories
 
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Part 1 of 2 Personal stories by Elder Hazel Squakin
Views: 16302 Aboriginal Education
UNREPENTANT: Canada's Residential Schools Documentary
 
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This award winning documentary reveals Canada's darkest secret - the deliberate extermination of indigenous (Native American) peoples and the theft of their land under the guise of religion. This never before told history as seen through the eyes of this former minister (Kevin Annett) who blew the whistle on his own church, after he learned of thousands of murders in its Indian Residential Schools. GET A DIGITAL DOWNLOAD: http://www.amazon.com/Unrepentant-Annett-Canada-Genocide-Documentary/dp/B00IMQOT7E First-hand testimonies from residential school survivors are interwoven with Kevin Annett's own story of how he faced firing, de-frocking, and the loss of his family, reputation and livelihood as a result of his efforts to help survivors and bring out the truth of the residential schools. Best Director Award at the 2006 New York Independent Film and Video Festival, and Best International Documentary at the 2006 Los Angeles Independent Film Festival LEARN MORE: http://kevinannett.com/ Produced By Louie Lawless, Kevin Annett and Lorie O'Rourke 2006
Views: 200729 Independent_Documentary
Chief’s intervention at Rio Tinto AGM
 
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Chief’s intervention at Rio Tinto AGM Présentation des Chefs à l’AGA de Rio Tinto
FULL INTERVIEW: JOHN BORROWS
 
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Full interview: John Borrows Keywords: defining Indigenous law; teaching about Indigenous law; relationship between Indigenous laws & Canadian laws; inclusion & engagement; gender and Indigenous law; generalizations, stereotypes; sources of law. This video is of an interview with Dr. John Borrows, Anishinaabe, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law, University of Victoria. The interview was done as part of a larger project to create three video shorts about Indigenous law. This full interview is included online as part of an archive, for viewers who want to watch the full interview that took place. For more information about the project, and to watch the video shorts that feature parts of Dr. Borrows’ interview, go to http://www.uvic.ca/law/about/indigenous/indigenouslawresearchunit/ This videos were created as part of the Indigenous Law Video On Demand project, for the Indigenous Law Research Unit (ILRU) in the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. The project included Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in collaboration and conversation. The video series was created by Kamala Todd (Indigenous City Media, Director & Editor), Emily Snyder (Project Lead & Producer), and Renée McBeth (Associate Producer). The project was supported by a grant from the .CA Community Investment Program and ILRU. © Indigenous Law Research Unit, 2015
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part Two)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth"" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies.This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Lari - Lohkare-etsijä, Lari - a prospecting dog
 
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Lari - Lohkare-etsijä Lari - a prospecting dog Malminetsintäkoira Lohkare-etsintäkoira Malmikoira Palveluskoira Ore detection dog Ore dog Valmistumisvuosi: 1966 Maa: Suomi Tuotanto: Geologinen tutkimuslaitos Laji: Lyhyt dokumentti, opetus Taustatietoja http://arkisto.gsf.fi/m17/m17_vrs_65_2.pdf http://tupa.gtk.fi/julkaisu/tutkimusraportti/tr_190.pdf http://lapland.conference-services.net/reports/template/onetextabstract.xml?xsl=template/onetextabstract.xsl&conferenceID=2462&abstractID=532919 The use of dogs in prospecting Jorma O. Valkama1, V. Juhani Ojala 2 1Geological Survey of Finland, Finland, 2Store Norske Gull AS, Finland Between 1964 and 1994, dogs (German Shepherds) were used by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) for tracing sulphide-containing boulders. Professor A. Kahma and T. Mustonen wondered in spring 1962 whether dogs could smell a rock containing sulphide ore, they, as most geologists world wide, had noticed, that sulphides give an odor especially when broken. They contacted late Mr Pentti Mattsson, a well know Finnish dog trainer, and asked if it would be possible to train a dog to smell ore. Mattsson asked if they smell, then it would be possible to train dogs for such a purpose. Mattsson started training a dog with pyrite boulders and soon they organised variety of experiments, with which the dog coped very well. Even in the winter, while braving freezing weather and deep snow, the dog found chalcopyrite boulders under the snow, and their belief about the dog's skills began to get stronger. The world's first prospecting dog Mattsson trained was Rajan Lari. Lari was trained to become the first prospecting dog in Finland and in the whole world. GTK used 16 prospecting dogs between 1964 and 1994 and mid 1980's there were eight dogs being used around Finland. The training methods for prospecting dogs were based on Pentti Mattsson's results obtained through experiments. In one test conducted in Virtasalmi in 1965, in an area covering over 9 km2, the dog found 1330 boulders containing sulphide in the test area, whereas the boulder prospector managed to find only 270 boulders, even though he knew that he was competing against a dog. The dogs were most effective smelling sulphide bearing rocks, including pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pyrite, galena and molybdenum. Based on Mattsson's example and training methods, the training of the world's first drug detection dogs began in the UK. The dog's effective working time was about six years and fieldwork period was about 6 months per year. The costs incurred by a prospecting dog consist mainly of the dog trainer's salary and other maintenance costs. The most valuable use was after a boulder discovery when dogs could quickly find more boulders to trace the source, and dogs played a role locating several mineralisations. In 1994, even though the overall results had been quite good, the use of dog was considered to be too expensive.
Views: 5263 vjojala
Canadian Senate Testimony on Bitcoin
 
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Andreas M. Antonopoulos presents expert witness testimony to the Canadian Senate Banking and Commerce Committee on October 8th 2014. He is a technologist and serial entrepreneur who has become one of the most well-known and respected figures in bitcoin. This hearing also featured: IRVING GERSTEIN, former Chair of the Senate’s Standing Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce. DOUGLAS BLACK, current Chair on the Senate Committee on Banking, Trade and Commerce. LARRY CAMPBELL, senator and 37th mayor of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. STEPHEN GREENE, senator for Halifax - The Citadel, Nova Scotia. PAUL MASSICOTTE, senator for De Lanaudière, Quebec. DAVID WELLS, senator from Newfoundland and Labrador. PIERRETTE RINGUETTE, senator for New Brunswick. DON MEREDITH, former senator for Ontario. CÉLINE HERVIEUX-PAYETTE, former senator for Bedford, Quebec. DAVID TKACHUK, senator for Saskatchewan. GHISLAIN MALTAIS, senator for Shawinegan, Quebec. Follow on Twitter: @aantonop https://twitter.com/aantonop Website: https://antonopoulos.com/ He is the author of two books: “Mastering Bitcoin,” published by O’Reilly Media and considered the best technical guide to bitcoin; “The Internet of Money,” a book about why bitcoin matters. THE INTERNET OF MONEY, v1: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Internet-Money-collection-Andreas-Antonopoulos/dp/1537000454/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 [NEW] THE INTERNET OF MONEY, v2: https://www.amazon.com/Internet-Money-Andreas-M-Antonopoulos/dp/194791006X/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 MASTERING BITCOIN: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mastering-Bitcoin-Unlocking-Digital-Cryptocurrencies/dp/1449374042 [NEW] MASTERING BITCOIN, 2nd Edition: https://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Bitcoin-Programming-Open-Blockchain/dp/1491954388 Subscribe to the channel to learn more about Bitcoin & open blockchains!
Views: 7457 aantonop
Idle No More: Protest to Change?
 
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Momentum and a movement: Idle No More organizers, supporters and observers discuss the objectives and significance of the movement with Steve Paikin.
Professor Robert Miller: The Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny
 
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Official video archive of presentation by Professor Robert Miller at the Indigenous Peoples Forum on the Doctrine of Discovery March 23, 2012 at the Arizona State Capitol House of Representatives
Views: 16563 Tonatierra
Quebec Iron Ore / Job Openings
 
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Quebec Iron Ore is committed to excellence in occupational health and safety. Beyond the policies, procedures and systems already in place, we firmly believe that employees—through their daily actions and involvement—make all the difference. Job Openings: http://mineraiferquebec.com/careers/?lang=en Quebec Iron Ore, a subsidiary of Champion Iron. On April 11, 2016, Champion Iron, the development and exploration company behind Quebec Iron Ore, officially became the owner of the Bloom Lake Mine facilities. A world-renowned mine located approximately 13 km north of Fermont. Quebec's iron: unbeatable quality. Website: http://mineraiferquebec.com/?lang=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mineraiferquebec/?fref=ts
Think Indigenous 8 Micheal Linklater_March_19_2015
 
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Micheal Linklater, Program Coordinator for White Buffalo Youth Lodge
Views: 3001 Usask
Global Iron Ore 2012 exclusive interview with Daniel Hynes
 
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For more information go to http://www.globalironore.com.au. We had the opportunity to speak with Daniel Hynes, Director of Commodities at Citigroup, who will be speaking at the 15th Annual Global Iron Ore & Steel Forecast 2012 on 20-21 March 2012 in Perth. Hear what he had to say. Questions: 1. How do you see the state of the world economy in 2012, and what impact is there likely to be on iron ore supply, demand and steel production? 2. Pricing structures have changed over the past few years -- how do you see iron ore valuation and pricing evolving over the next few years? 3. There will be a lot to discuss at the Global Iron Ore & Steel Forecast Conference in Perth in March. Do you think it will be a time for critical decision making? 4. What can we expect from the iron ore market in 2012 and beyond? [email protected] +61 2 9080 4307 http://www.globalironore.com.au http://www.informa.com.au/linkedin/ironore http://www.twitter.com/informa_oz http://www.youtube.com/informaoz
Views: 313 Informa Australia
Are the Metis Treaty People?
 
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Dr. Adam Gaudry from the University of Saskatchewan argues that the Manitoba Act should be thought of as a treaty between the Metis Nation and Canada. Part of the 2015-2016 Weweni Indigenous Scholars Speaker Series presented by the Indigenous Affairs Office. From January 6, 2016.
Views: 8917 UWinnipeg
Inside Story Americas - Canada's indigenous movement gains momentum
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Canada's Idle No More movement began as a small social media campaign - armed with little more than a hashtag and a cause. But it has grown into a large indigenous movement, with protests and ceremonial gatherings held almost daily in many of the country's major cities. The movement is spearheaded by Theresa Spence, the leader of the Attawapiskat, a small native band in northern Ontario. Spence is now 22 days into a hunger strike on Ottawa's Victoria Island just across from the Canadian Parliament. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 18599 Al Jazeera English
Indigenous Feminisms Power Panel
 
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Views: 6519 Usask
Think Indigenous 5 Colby Tootoosis_March_19_2015
 
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Colby Tootoosis, Youth Spokesperson, Headman Poundmaker
Views: 2378 Usask
Aboriginal Education
 
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Education has long been heralded as the key to economic improvement. Leading economist Don Drummond has studied the economic inequality of Canada's First Nations and concluded that every effort must be taken to lead young people to post-secondary education. What barriers make a university or college education extremely difficult to achieve for First Nations young people?
National Aboriginal Day: Our Voice, Our Culture, Our Community, Aboriginal Youth Video Project
 
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The Aboriginal Youth Video Project involved teaching 12 young people from Richmond, British Columbia, how to create a video story of their experience as young Aboriginal people living in Richmond. The youth were encouraged to reflect on their history and current issues in society, and to include footage and reflections on Richmonds National Aboriginal Day events which celebrate Aboriginal identity. The video is to be used to support teaching about healing and reconciliation. The video is used with permission from the Richmond Youth Services Agency.
Views: 11903 presvideo
Richard Wagamese - Indian Horse
 
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Presented by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. In this emotional tale of Saul Indian Horse, Richard Wagamese tells the realistic story of a man whose life is drastically changed by one of Canada's most painful histories. When Saul was a child he was taken away from his family and forced into an Indian Residential School where he witnessed and experienced unimaginable abuses at the hands of the school's educators. In spite of the harrowing atrocities, it is at the school that Saul discovers his love of hockey, a game that, for a short time, serves as a means of escape. Saul's talent leads to a draft with a minor league team and a spot on Team Canada during the 1972 Canada-Soviet Summit Series. However, as Saul grows into a man, he struggles with racism and alcohol addiction. Saul's tumultuous adulthood eventually leads him back to his roots, where he confronts his past and begins a new journey towards healing. Richard Wagamese is an Ojibway author from the Wabaseemoong First Nation in Northwestern Ontario. He is the author of several fiction and non-fiction works including For Joshua: An Ojibway Father Teaches His Son, Runaway Dreams, and Indian Horse. Wagamese has also been a journalist and, in 1991, became the first Aboriginal Canadian to receive the National Newspaper Award for Column Writing. His most recent novel, Indian Horse, was chosen as the winner of First Nation Communities Read, and is on the Globe and Mail's bestseller's list as well as the Canadian Booksellers Association's bestseller's list. Among his awards, Wagamese's memoir One Native Life was listed as one of The Globe and Mail's 100 Best Books of 2008. In 2010 he accepted an Honorary Doctor of Letters from Thompson Rivers University. Wagamese currently lives just outside of Kamloops, BC with his wife, Debra Powell, and Molly the Story Dog.
FULL STORY: Failing Canada’s First Nations Children
 
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Canadian kids from isolated communities forced to move away from their families – just to go to school. For more info, please go to www.global16x9.com.
Views: 189968 16x9onglobal
WUS2015 Uranium mining and health issues in the USA
 
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DOUG BRUGGE (USA) Professor, Tufts University Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Co-editor of “The Navajo People and Uranium Mining” LEONA MORGAN (USA) Leona Morgan, Dene No Nukes, former coordinator Eastern Navajo Dine Against Uranium Mining THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 165 Uranium2015
2014 Sol Kanee Lecture - Justice Murray Sinclair
 
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The Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul's College, University of Manitoba, is proud to present the Eleventh Annual Sol Kanee Lecture on International Peace and Justice. This year's guest lecturer was Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (www.trc.ca). Justice Sinclair addressed the question: What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? The lecture took place on Monday, September 29, 2014 at the University of Manitoba. 0:04 Opening Remarks and Welcome: Dr. Sean Byrne, Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul’s College 4:32 Greetings: Dr. Chris Adams, Rector, St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba 6:55 Introduction of Justice Murray Sinclair: Dr. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Native Studies, University of Manitoba 17:20 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 1 46:28 Video presentations – Justice Murray included a series of video interviews with residential school survivors as a part of his lecture 53:30 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 2 1:29:33 Question and Answer Period: Dr. Sean Byrne, Moderator 1:59:12 Acknowledgement Peace and Conflicts Studies students, Ms. Mary Anne Clarke and Ms. Jennifer Ham acknowledge and thank Justice Sinclair 2:01:18 Concluding Remarks: Dr. Sean Byrne For more information on this and other Mauro Centre events, please visit: www.facebook.com/maurocentre www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/mauro_centre/
Views: 1217 MauroCentre
Crisis on Tap Full Video for CAHR
 
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Filled with interviews and interesting facts from indigenous peoples and scientists from Canada and around the world, fresh footage and new perspectives, this documentary offers a unique insight into the current conditions of water quality in Canada’s First Nations Communities. Some of these results are surprising and some are shocking and it is our hope that this documentary will engage, but more importantly, inform viewers. The Producer and Director is Dr Jeffrey Reading, (Mohawk Tyendinaga), and the Associate Producers are Robynne Edgar, (Metis Ancestry from Batoche) and Karen Davies (Cedarwood Productions).
Views: 5154 cedarwoodproductions
RSC 2012 Governor General Lecture Series: We Are All Treaty People: New Models for a Shared Future
 
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The Royal Society of Canada 2012 Governor General Lecture Series Professor James Miller, FRSC February 9th 2012 - University of Victoria Duration: 38:55
Views: 677 RSC SRC
Understanding Aboriginal Identity
 
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Understanding Aboriginal Identity explores the complex issue of self-identification for Aboriginal people. Today, Aboriginal identity remains inextricably linked with past government legislation and the continued stereotyping of Aboriginal people in the media and Canadian history. From a Metis farm in rural Alberta, to the offices of Canada’s leading scholars, Understanding Aboriginal Identity examines the factors that shape who we are. To order this video please go to www.bearpaweducation.ca/videos
Views: 74039 BearPaw Legal
Niigaan: In Conversation -  Victoria Freeman
 
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Niigaan: In Conversation. March 9, 2013. National Arts Centre, unceded Algonquin territory. Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair introducing the presentation from Victoria Freeman on the history of Canadian colonization. Featuring remarks by event host Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair, and responses to audience questions by Dr. Leanne Betasamosake Simpson.
Views: 680 niigaanfuture
Intergenerational Trauma and Education
 
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Keynote By: Dr. Suzanne Stewart Canada Research Chair and OISE's Special Advisor to the Dean on Aboriginal Education
Views: 4172 OISE UofT
Elder In The Making | Episode 5: A Broken Treaty
 
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What follows from the treaty signing is a genocide in slow motion. Elder Narcisse Blood shares his story growing up in residential school and the person he has become. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/optiklocal/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/optiklocal
Views: 9141 STORYHIVE
Cap-Ex Ventures - Building canada's next Iron Ore Company
 
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Cap-Ex Ventures Ltd. is a Canadian resource company focused on exploration and development of iron ore projects in the Labrador Trough near Schefferville, Quebec. The Company's Block 103 property is on strike to New Millennium's direct shipping ore ("DSO") deposits and KeMag magnetite deposits both to the north and New Millennium/Labrador Iron Mines DSO deposits to the south. This interview with Brett Matich, President and CEO of Cap-Ex, was recorded on the 10th IRC Investor Relations Conference in May 2011 in Zurich.
Views: 1905 GOLDINVEST
The Saskatoon Police Service - Never the Same Day Twice
 
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The Saskatoon Police Service offers career opportunities that are worth serious consideration. The city has a rapidly growing Aboriginal population and the service must reflect this change. As protectors and peacemakers, the role police play in any community is invaluable. The police service offers careers both on the front lines and in civilian support positions. For more information visit saskatoonpoliceservice.ca. ©2014 Saskatoon Police Service
Views: 13301 SaskatoonPolice
Big Thinking - Justice Sinclair - What do we do about the legacy of Indian residential schools?
 
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The Honourable Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC), presents Congress 2015’s introductory Big Thinking lecture. Justice Sinclair was appointed Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in March of 1988 and to the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba in January 2001. In Ottawa to preside over the TRC’s closing events and the release of the Commission’s final report, Justice Sinclair discusses the legacy of residential schools and offer a call for action towards reconciliation in Canada, including the role of universities and academics in this process. L’Honorable Juge Murray Sinclair, Président de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada (CVR), anime la première causerie Voir grand au Congrès 2015. Le juge Murray Sinclair a été nommé juge en chef adjoint de la Cour provinciale du Manitoba en mars 1988 et de la Cour d’appel du Manitoba en janvier 2001. À Ottawa pour présider les événements de clôture de la CVR et la diffusion du rapport final de la Commission, le juge Sinclair discute de l’héritage des pensionnats autochtones et proposera des mesures qui tendent vers la réconciliation au Canada, y compris du rôle des universités dans ce processus.
Views: 8684 IdeasIdees
WUS2015 Uranium mining wastes in North-America: best practices & issues
 
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PAUL ROBINSON (USA) Research director, Southwest Research and Information Centre THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 49 Uranium2015
Douglas Talks About... The National Museum of the American Indian: Part 2
 
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This video is part two of the "Douglas Talks About... The National Museum of the American Indian" episode in a series of short films initiated by the Carleton Centre for Public History as part of the Douglas Cardinal Archive Project. The stories Douglas recounts are inspired by the documents and materials contained within the Douglas Cardinal Collection at Carleton University. Complete footage from the interview (conducted by Elizabeth Paradis on October 26, 2011) will be made available through the Carleton University Library, Archives and Research Collections. Check us out at dcardinalproject.tumblr.com
Views: 432 Cardinalproject
This Is My Story by Henry Basil - TRC March 29, 2014
 
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Free News Sharing and On-Line Art Gallery http://www.ciactivist.org FEATURE: The 2016 Fire and Rain art project that began in early January was inspired by news stories on wildfires that burned throughout Western Canada in 2015. Paintings were displayed outdoors publicly throughout Edmonton and their stories shared on YouTube. I used art from the beginning to defend freedom of expression on the Alberta Legislature grounds when it was verbally banned 3 times by Legislature officials. Some of the YouTubes published shared how the wildfires and flooding that followed affected Albertans, their communities and the environment. I hope my art and the stories shared will inspire us to contemplate the calamities in Alberta of 2016 as a collective and together help each other find ways and better solutions to save our planet and our children's future. Doug Brinkman
Views: 2203 Doug Brinkman
Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada
 
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Canada Lecture: The Demographic Profile of First Nations in Canada with Keith Conn -- Chief Operation Officer, First Nations Statistical Institute (FNSI) March 27, 2012 Bannatyne Campus, University of Manitoba The Canada Lecture is an initiative from the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, Canada's leading agency dedicated to the elimination of racism in the country. This lecture took place with the joined participation of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation, the First Nations Statistical Institute and the University of Manitoba.
FULL INTERVIEW: VAL NAPOLEON + REBECCA JOHNSON (PART 1)
 
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Full interview: Val Napoleon & Rebecca Johnson (part 1) Keywords: defining Indigenous law; interpretation & law; challenging settler narratives of Indigenous law; law & stories; Indigenous law as living, practical resources; teaching Indigenous law; Indigenous & settler relations; reconciliation. This video is of the first half of an interview with Dr. Val Napoleon (Cree, Director of the Indigenous Law Research Unit, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria) and Dr. Rebecca Johnson (Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria). The interview was done as part of a larger project to create three video shorts about Indigenous law. This full interview is included online as part of an archive, for viewers who want to watch the full interview that took place. For more information about the project, and to watch the video shorts that feature parts of Dr. Napoleon and Dr. Johnson’s interview, go to http://www.uvic.ca/law/about/indigenous/indigenouslawresearchunit/ This videos were created as part of the Indigenous Law Video On Demand project, for the Indigenous Law Research Unit in the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. The project included Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in collaboration and conversation. The video series was created by Kamala Todd (Indigenous City Media, Director & Editor), Emily Snyder (Project Lead & Producer), and Renée McBeth (Associate Producer). The project was supported by a grant from the .CA Community Investment Program and ILRU. © Indigenous Law Research Unit, 2015
Harvest of Hope: 4 Phil Fontaine
 
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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 4, Phil Fontaine gives a talk entitled, "The Apology Breakthrough: Now What?" Chief Phil Fontaine (Sagkeeng First Nation) is a dedicated and highly respected leader in Canada. He has been instrumental in facilitating change and advancement for First Nations people from the time he was first elected to public office as Chief, at the young age of twenty-eight. He is a proud member of the Sagkeeng First Nation in Manitoba and still plays an active role in the support of his community. In the early 1980s he was elected to the position of Manitoba Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations. When his term expired in 1991, he was elected Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs where he served three consecutive terms. He played a key role in the development of Manitoba's Framework Agreement Initiative and in the defeat of the Meech Lake Accord, and signed an Employment Equity Agreement with thirty-nine federal agencies. In 1997 he stepped onto the national stage where he was elected to the highest elected position in First Nations politics, National Chief. He is now serving an unprecedented third term in office. His list of accomplishments as National Chief include signing the Declaration of Kinship and Cooperation of the Indigenous and First Nations of North America; being the first Indigenous leader to address the Organization of American States; leading the successful resolution and settlement of the 150-year Indian residential school tragedy; the Making Poverty History Campaign; lobbying for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People; and negotiating a fair and just process for the settlement of specific land claims. National Chief Fontaine has received many awards and honors for his work, including four honorary degrees and membership in the Order of Manitoba. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views: 2218 SmithsonianNMAI
Sherry Farrell Racette - "Escaping the Cage: Cultural Performance as Activism, 1890-1951"
 
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Sherry Farrell Racette presents the paper "Escaping the Cage: Cultural Performance as Activism, 1890-1951." Part of Imagining History: A Canadian Women Artists History Initiative Conference, May 3-5 2012, Concordia University. This video has been created for educational purposes only. If you are the copyright holder to any of the images projected in the video and you object to their use in this fashion, please contact [email protected] .
Views: 493 CWAHI Concordia
Promise - Education As A Treaty Right (Part 1)
 
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A look at First Nations education within Treaty 8 First Nations in Alberta. This documentary is the first in a series of three videos that shows the challenges faced by Educators, Administrators and communities in teaching their children on-reserve. With interviews and discussions by people working on the ground at these schools this video gives you a window into modern "Indian" education within Northern Alberta. Produced by Bearpaw Communications and the Treaty 8 Education Commission. Copyright by Treaty 8 First Nations of Alberta
Views: 2180 Treaty8FirstNations
Understanding the TRC Calls to Action
 
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March 23, 2016 Panel Discussion Re-Visioning Teacher Education: Responding to the TRC Calls-to-Action 2016 University of Manitoba
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 2- A Knowledge Gap
 
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The effects of Residential Schools, and the forces of colonization, are examined in relation to First Nations health
Views: 6285 fnhealthcouncil
National Aboriginal Day (2010)
 
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National Aboriginal Day (NAD) is celebrated every June 21st. NAD is a time for all Canadians to recognize the unique heritage, the diverse cultures and the outstanding contributions of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. For more information about Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, please visit http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca. For more information about National Aboriginal day, please visit http://www.nad.gc.ca. Read a transcript of this video on the AANDC web site: http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100013727/1100100013729
Views: 4189 GCIndigenous