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Panel Discussion: Open Access Advocacy
 
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Panel Discussion with Matt Cockerill, Conrad Omonhinmin and Tom Olijhoek. Open Access Africa 2012, an event hosted by BioMed Central, was held at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Researchers, librarians, journal editors, research funders and professionals working in research information explored the implications of open access for African research.
Views: 148 BMC
Survivors in the Sand
 
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Survivors in the Sand tracks international scientists trying to unlock the secrets of the world's deserts. This hour-long documentary, developed for prime-time national television, also looks at those who choose to live in the desert, these resilient people struggle to earn a living and sustain the fragile, arid land they call home. Purchase DVD copies of this series at: http://mediaproductions.nmsu.edu/videos.html#anchor_37814 © 2005 Copyright NMSU Board of Regents. All rights reserved. Produced by NMSU Media Productions
Views: 79890 NewMexicoStateU
Maritime Asia: Securitization of the China Seas
 
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The Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Department of Politics & International Studies, University of Cambridge, is convening a workshop on “Maritime Asia” with a focus on the “securitization” of the China Seas in the 19th and 20th Centuries. This public forum presents the highlights from the workshop. Anchored in the disciplines of historical and international studies, we view “securitization” as a process of politicization that is geographically defined, historically contingent, resource constrained and trans-temporal in its effects. We also view securitization as the formation of a discourse that is contingent upon complex speech acts in multiple sites. What can we learn from China's modern history about the nation's long-term aspirations as a maritime power? How does Beijing pursue naval preeminence in a post-Cold War political economy of globalizing connections and multilateral agreements? As China aspires to become a major Asian maritime power in the 21st century, we propose to examine the how, why, and the so what, internally and internationally, about its significance.
Views: 378 UC Berkeley Events
Surface mining
 
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Surface mining, including strip mining, open-pit mining and mountaintop removal mining, is a broad category of mining in which soil and rock overlying the mineral deposit are removed. It is the opposite of underground mining, in which the overlying rock is left in place, and the mineral removed through shafts or tunnels. Surface mining began in the mid-sixteenth century and is practiced throughout the world, although the majority of surface mining occurs in North America. It gained popularity throughout the 20th century, and is now the predominant form of mining in coal beds such as those in Appalachia and America's Midwest. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1436 Audiopedia
The Power of Unreasonable People - RMIT University
 
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RMIT SEED's program http://rmit.net.au/browse;ID=givy2hstrrw8z Dr Pamela Hartigan is a world leader on social enterprise and how highly unconventional entrepreneurs are solving some of the world's most pressing economic, social, and environmental problems. Presenting the inaugural SEEDS annual lecture, Pamela discusses how social enterprises can create communities, cities and countries as hubs for change. Drawing on her bestselling book The Power of Unreasonable People: How Entrepreneurs Create Markets that Change the World, Pamela provides a first-hand insight into the mindsets and strategies of this new breed of entrepreneur.
Views: 1423 RMIT University
Champions of Change: Innovations in Renewable Energy Part 1
 
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The White House honors nine individuals as Champions of Change who are making a difference advancing new ideas that are leading the way to a clean energy future and an economy that's built to last.
Views: 3116 The Obama White House
Matthew S. Henry - Extractive Fictions: Energy and Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene
 
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The ASU Department of English presents doctoral candidate Matthew S. Henry in a "warm-up" talk for a forthcoming presentation in Stanford University's Environmental Humanities Project lecture series. This talk, titled "Extractive Fictions: Energy and Environmental Justice in the Anthropocene," will begin with a discussion of "extractive fictions," or cultural productions that map the uneven impacts of fossil fuel extraction on poor, ethnic minority, and indigenous communities. As a case study, it will focus on fiction, poetry, and public art exhibits that respond to socio-ecological crises associated with coal and gas development in impoverished rural communities in northern Appalachia, with an emphasis on the ways in which artists are challenging dominant narratives of extraction as a path to economic and social progress. The talk will close with an exploration of collaborative, cross-disciplinary reclamation art projects that prompt affected communities to envision post-extraction futures and an epistemological shift away from extraction culture. Matthew S. Henry is a PhD candidate in the English at ASU. He is currently completing a dissertation entitled "Hydronarratives: Reading Water in the Anthropocene," which explores the ways in which U.S. and Anglophone writers, artists, and filmmakers frame water crises in terms of social and economic justice. His most recent scholarly and creative work has appeared in ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and the Environment, ARIEL: A Review of International English Literature, High Country News, and Everything Change: An Anthology of Climate Fiction. Thursday, Apr. 26, 2018 ASU Tempe campus
PRACTICE: Outside In | Inside Out
 
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This symposium considers discourse on contemporary issues of design practice in two parts: the external pressures of economic, environmental, and political systems, and internal forces of tools, techniques, and strategies for design. Addressing the multifaceted nature of the profession, we will explore themes for the design of practice, such as work and labor, tools and technology, and ethics and agency. The symposium highlights potential avenues for the growth and constitution of practice, as well as the issues currently at stake within the profession. The following discussions confront pressing questions regarding the shifting responsibilities of design practice, and the future of practice itself. This symposium is generously sponsored by the Carl M. Sapers Ethics in Practice Fund, and co-hosted by the GSD Practice Platform and the Department of Architecture. Panelists: Aaron Cayer, Neena Verma, Jesse Keenan, Alison Brooks, Eduard Sancho Pou, Sawako Kaijima, Randy Deutsch, Robert Pietrusko Moderators: Mark Lee, Grace La
Views: 2112 Harvard GSD
Black 9/11: Money, Motive, Technology, and Plausible Deniability
 
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Special thanks to Michael C. Ruppert, Mark H. Gaffney, and Kevin Ryan for their dedicated research in bringing this information out of the shadowy black operations underworld from which it came. This video is a compilation of evidence they have uncovered. "Inside Job" Documentary on the Financial "Crisis" of 2008 http://www.theotherschoolofeconomics.org/?p=2499 "Crossing the Rubicon" - The Decline of American Empire at the end of the age of oil http://www.fromthewilderness.com "Black 911" by Mark H. Gaffney: http://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2011/05/25/black-911-a-walk-on-the-dark-side-part-3/ Was 9/11 an Inside Job? http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article20521.htm A guide to 9/11 Whistleblowers http://www.corbettreport.com/articles/20100305_911_whistleblowers.htm Project Hammer http://decryptedmatrix.com/live/bushs-project-hammer/ WTC 6 http://www.whale.to/b/wtc_6_h.html SEC Act Section 12(k)2: http://www.sec.gov/rules/other/34-44791.htm Richard Grove's testimony (complete transcript) http://www.freewebs.com/abigsecret/grove.html "Collateral Damage" by E.P. Heidner http://www.wanttoknow.info/911/Collateral-Damage-911-black_eagle_fund_trust.pdf The CIA's forty-year complicity in the narcotics trade by Alfred W. McCOY http://www.cob.sjsu.edu/facstaff/davis_r/fallout.htm Executive Order 12333 created an agreement between the CIA and Justice Department (DEA) to look the other way on Government Drug Trafficking: http://www.fas.org/irp/offdocs/eo/eo-12333-2008.pdf AIG and Drug Money http://www.fromthewilderness.com/free/ciadrugs/part_2.html Maurice Greenberg's report for the CFR http://www.fas.org/irp/cfr.html Richard Armitage, Frank Carlucci, Herbert Winokur, and company http://digwithin.net/2012/04/08/911-as-a-sequel-to-iran-contra/ Post 9/11 Promotions: http://arabesque911.blogspot.com/2007/11/911-incompetence-sabotage-and.html#_edn10 9/11 Gold Theft and other smoking guns: http://911review.org/Wget/Killtown/9_11-Smoking-Guns.html http://killtown.911review.org/oddities.html#February26,1993-WTC_gold Kevin Ryan's landmark article on who had "Demolition access to the WTC Towers": Tenants: http://www.911review.com/articles/ryan/demolition_access_p1.html Security: http://www.911review.com/articles/ryan/demolition_access_p2.html Convergence: http://www.911review.com/articles/ryan/carlyle_kissinger_saic_halliburton.html Clean Up: http://www.911review.com/articles/ryan/demolition_access_p4.html Kevin R. Ryan, et al, Environmental anomalies at the World Trade Center: evidence for energetic materials, The Environmentalist, Volume 29, Number 1 / March, 2009, http://www.springerlink.com/content/f67q6272583h86n4/ Kevin R. Ryan, The Top Ten Connections Between NIST and Nanothermites, Journal of 9/11 Studies, July 2008, http://www.journalof911studies.com/volume/2008/Ryan_NIST_and_Nano-1.pdf Website for In-Q-Tel, http://www.iqt.org/technology-portfolio/index-by-practice-area.html Wikipedia page for Jerome Hauer, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerome_Hauer Peter Jennings interview with Jerome Hauer, ABC, on 9/11, 14:53, available on You Tube, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj0Rz9ZsDAg Taku Murakami, US Patent 5532449 - Using plasma ARC and thermite to demolish concrete, http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5532449/description.html Albert Gibson et al, Integral low-energy thermite igniter, US Patent number: 4464989, http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=rKl1AAAAEBAJ&dq=US+4464989 Michael C. Ruppert, Suppressed Details of Criminal Insider Trading Lead Directly into the CIA's Highest Ranks, October 9, 2001, http://www.fromthewilderness.com/free/ww3/10_09_01_krongard.html Kevin R. Ryan, Mahmud Ahmed's itinerary from his Washington DC visit the week of 9/11, 911blogger.com, 11/27/2009, http://www.911blogger.com/node/21978 The agreement between LLNL and Savannah River can be found here - https://www.llnl.gov/str/News597.html Savannah's reference to developing sol-gels can be found here - http://srnl.doe.gov/mat_sci.htm SEC document for Washington pre-payments - http://www.secinfo.com/dRqWm.4G1Vx.c.htm The Ties That Bind, Descended from family business empires, six huge business groups dominate the Japanese economy, Multinational Monitor, October 1983 - http://multinationalmonitor.org/hyper/issues/1983/10/ties.html Securacomm Consulting Inc. v. Securacom Incorporated, United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, January 20, 1999, 49 U.S.P.Q.2d 1444; 166 F.3d 182, http://altlaw.org/v1/cases/1099498 Wikipedia page for Stratesec, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stratesec SEC filing for Stratesec, May 2, 1997, http://www.secinfo.com/dS7kv.82.htm Kroll Inc website, http://www.kroll.com/about/
Views: 225759 AlienScientist
The Camp and the City: Territories of Extraction
 
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Please join editors, Jeannette Sordi, Luis Valenzuela, and Felipe Vera for a discussion of their new book The Camp and the City: Territories of Extraction. They will be joined in a panel discussion with contributors, Maria Ignacia Arrasate, Sourav Kumar Biswas, and Agustina Gonzáles Cid. Urbanization metabolizes territories surrounding cities as well as territories that are located far beyond the centers themselves and provide the needed resources and goods. Landscapes of extraction are probably one of the most evident examples of this: whole regions are exploited for their resources to ensure the development of others. However, while it is becoming evident that these territories could be considered as part of the urbanization process itself, they are still very marginal in the agenda of urban designers, planners, regional administrators, and political institutions. Territories of extraction are not paid enough attention as places for living themselves – they are in a way the negative of cities: they are what ensures the development, prosperity, and consolidation of cities, but are themselves the emblem of deployment and precariousness. The Camp and the City book aims to articulate a discussion about territories of extraction in order to set up concepts and provide a general overview of their common challenges throughout different landscapes. Calama – the most important mining cluster in Chile and one of the most important hubs for copper extraction in the world – is presented as a case study in order to generate a more specific and evidence-based discussion, offering the ground for the development of a more projective critical view. The Camp and the City: Territories of Extraction is edited by Jeannette Sordi, Luis Valenzuela, Felipe Vera, with essays by Pablo Allard, Maria Ignacia Arrasate, Mariana Barrera, Sourav Kumar Biswas, Diane Davis, Agustina González Cid, Rania Goshn, El Hadi Jazairy, Rahul Mehrotra, Flavio Sciaraffia, Jeannette Sordi, Ricardo Truffello, Luis Valenzuela, Felipe Vera. This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Urban Planning and Design at the GSD and the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies.
Views: 767 Harvard GSD
Kiley Fellow Lecture: Danielle Choi
 
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Danielle Choi is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. She teaches in the Masters of Landscape Architecture core studio sequence and leads design research seminars. Choi’s research concerns the role of landscape architecture in the political ecology of the built environment. At the turn of the 20th century, large-scale infrastructure and public parks in American cities co-authored multiple narratives of environmental control, crisis management, and regional boundaries. Currently, her research on these issues concerns civil waterworks, aquatic ecology and the public realm in Chicago, and the politics of contemporary landscape preservation in these living environments. Choi is a licensed landscape architect in New York State and founder of LILAC. She was the 2016-2017 Daniel Urban Kiley Fellow in Landscape Architecture at the GSD. Prior to joining the GSD, she taught studio in urban design at Columbia University GSAPP and was a senior associate at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates in New York City, where she led strategy and design of complex urban landscapes and managed large, multi-disciplinary teams. Choi also worked as a designer at Topotek in Berlin and SCAPE in New York City. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in art history from the University of Chicago and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the GSD, where she received the Jacob Weidenmann graduation award for excellence in design.
Views: 1415 Harvard GSD
GSD Talks: Clare Lyster and Mason White
 
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Clare Lyster and Mason White join Charles Waldheim, Daniel Ibañez, and others to discuss the recently released volume, Third Coast Atlas: Prelude to a Plan. Third Coast Atlas: Prelude to a Plan (Ibañez, Lyster, Waldheim, and White, eds.) describes the conditions for urbanization across the Great Lakes region. It assembles a multi-layered, empirical description of urbanization processes within the drainage basins of the five Great Lakes and the Saint Lawrence River. This thick description encompasses a range of representational forms including maps, plans, diagrams, timelines, and photographs, as well as speculative design research projects and critical texts. Postponing diagnosis, let alone treatment of these conditions, Third Coast Atlas aspires to simply describe. It proposes a new geographic gestalt for urban analysis. Superimposed upon the North American continent, and with easily recognizable yet divergent political and geological borders, this megaregion traverses portions of eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, as well as the world’s largest collection of surficial fresh water. Third Coast Atlas characterizes the littoral edge as a distinct field of urbanization, and constructs a reading of the region both specific and speculative. In this event, Lyster and White will present a brief lecture, followed by a panel discussion with Pierre Bélanger, Rosetta Elkin, Daniel Ibañez, and Rania Ghosn. Charles Waldheim will host and moderate the discussion. Clare Lyster is an Irish architect, educator, and writer based in Chicago, Illinois. Lyster is associate professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Architecture. She is principal of CLUAA, a research-based design office in Chicago operating at the intersection of architecture, landscape, and planning. In addition to her design practice, Lyster writes about architecture and urbanism from the perspective of contemporary theories in landscape, infrastructure, and globalization. Lyster is author of Learning from Logistics: How Networks Inform Cities (Birkhauser, 2015) and her essays have appeared in Cabinet, Chicago Architect, Journal of Architectural Education, Journal of Landscape Architecture, MONU, The Architect’s Newspaper, and Places. Mason White is a Canadian-American architect and urbanist based in Toronto, Ontario. White is founding partner of Lateral Office, a Toronto-based experimental design practice that operates at the intersection of architecture, landscape, and urbanism. In addition to his practice, White is associate professor at the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design at the University of Toronto. He is recipient of the Emerging Voices and Young Architects Prize from the Architectural League of New York; the Wheelwright Fellowship from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design; the Friedman Visiting Professorship at the University of California, Berkeley; and the Lefevre Fellowship at The Ohio State University. White is co-editor of Bracket, vol. 1 and co-editor of Pamphlet Architecture, no. 30: Coupling—Strategies for Infrastructural Opportunism.
Views: 590 Harvard GSD
WATCH LIVE: CBC Vancouver News at 6 for Thursday, January 17
 
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Watch CBC Vancouver News at 6 with hosts Anita Bathe and Mike Killeen for the latest on the most important news stories happening across B.C. They're joined by meteorologist Johanna Wagstaffe who brings you the most up to date weather forecasts and added expertise on what's trending in the world of science.
Views: 426 CBC Vancouver
2008 Latornell Pioneer John Gunn
 
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The Conservation Pioneer Award honours individuals who have contributed significantly to the conservation movement in Ontario. These prestigious awards are presented annually to deserving individuals at the A.D. Latornell Conservation Symposium. This award is designed to recognize individuals who have demonstrated life-long, outstanding contributions to the field of conservation. They are recognized for their innovation, leadership and dedication to the conservation field. Either through their personal activities and/or leadership, they have gone beyond the call of duty or responsibility to an employer, client or their community. These individuals have helped to celebrate and inspire innovation in the conservation field and have made a difference in their area of expertise. Nominees have encouraged and motivated others to take similar leadership roles towards conservation work. Nominations are reviewed and evaluated by a special sub-committee of the Latornell Steering Committee. www.latornell.ca/pioneer Dr. John Gunn Nominating Agency: Nickel District Conservation Authority John Gunn has had a distinguished career as a University Professor and Scientist who has spent over 25 years working at the forefront of freshwater and restoration ecology. Dr. Gunn has produced over 150 publications (including 53 journal papers) in the field of restoration ecology and has been a grant holder with Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada since 1992. In recognition of his expertise, John was recently appointed to the Premiers Lake Simcoe Science Advisory Committee. Dr. Gunn leads the Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit in Sudbury whose mandate is to collaborate with community groups and industry in order to ensure the long-term protection of water resources. The Cooperative Freshwater Ecology Unit operates one of the longest and most extensive monitoring programs in the world measuring the impacts of multiple stressors on freshwater ecosystems. Their findings have effected environmental clean-up efforts locally as well as contributing to national and even international efforts to ensure cleaner water. Currently, Dr. Gunn is leading an effort to build a new research centre called the Living With the Lakes Centre at Laurentian University. The Centre will focus regional efforts in an attempt to protect and restore local watersheds. It is expected that these local achievements will provide a blueprint for similar undertakings globally. John Gunn has been the recipient of numerous prestigious awards including the Alumni Achievement Award (research and public education) from the University of Guelph and the Presidents Award for Conservation from the American Fisheries Society. Dr. Gunns career has been built on the premise that protection and recovery of ecological resources is dependent upon a combination of good science and cooperation among citizens, industry and government at all levels.
PACCARB Day 2: Environmental Compartments of AMR and Antibiotics Metabolites
 
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-- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov We accept comments in the spirit of our comment policy: http://www.hhs.gov/web/socialmedia/policies HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html
America's Climate Change Future – Session 3: Institutional dynamics of climate action and inaction
 
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America's Climate Change Future: Housing Markets, Stranded Assets, and Entrenched Interests Session 3: Institutional dynamics of climate action and inaction Presider: Timmons Roberts (Brown University) Robert Brulle (Brown University), “Organized efforts against climate action” Loredana Loy (Cornell University), “Channeling the Brand: the Tea Party Movement and Climate Change Policy” Justin Farrell (Yale University), “Climate Change Countermovement Organizations and Media Attention in the U.S.” Kerry Ard (Ohio State University), “Public opinion on climate and Congressional voting” Discussant: Won Ha (Energy Foundation) The Rhodes Center for International Economics, the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, and the Office of the President are pleased to announce a one day conference on the economic and political consequences of climate change. The conference focuses on three key areas. First, the economics of rising sea levels for real coastal estate markets, which comprise a large portion of US housing market growth and hence personal wealth. The economics of ‘stranded carbon assets.’ That is, the raw materials and financial assets tied up in carbon release that have a high current value but whose values could decline precipitously in the future, especially if ambitious action is undertaken as scientific consensus suggests is needed. The third is the organized politics of climate denial: who are the agents and institutions behind scientific disinformation and how can such a politics best be countered? A lunchtime keynote speech will be given by Rhode Island Senator Sheldon Whitehouse. Lunch will be provided for participants. Read full Research Brief on the conference: https://watson.brown.edu/research/2019/brown-university-hosts-conference-americas-climate-change-future Co-sponsored by the Office of the President, the Rhodes Center, and IBES, Brown University, and the Office of U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse
Naomi Wolf and Jim Pfaus talk sex
 
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http://concordia.ca/talks Naomi Wolf's latest book, Vagina: A New Biography, uses research by Concordia psychology professor Jim Pfaus to tackle the complex subject of female sexuality. On February 7, 2013, Wolf and Pfaus shared their fascinating research relationship with a live audience at Concordia University. The event was part of the Concordia - Globe and Mail national conversation series on aging well. http://www.concordia.ca/now/what-we-do/research/20130107/concordia-welcomes-naomi-wolf.php
Views: 30269 Concordia University
Workshop #2: Intellectual Commons event series
 
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This fall, SA+P Dean Hashim Sarkis and Architecture's Mark Jarzombek organized a series of talks and workshops under the theme Intellectual Commons. The series launched on October 2 with a keynote lecture from Saskia Sassen titled, "Where and how is the Global constituted?" The second installment in the series, "Academia and Agency in the Era of Global Change," a workshop with SA+P faculty Rania Ghosn, Jason Jackson, Gabriella Carolini, and Arindam Dutta, moderated by Saskia Sassen and Mark Jarzombek was held on October 9. The second and final workshop on November 15 with SA+P faculty Ethan Zuckerman, Nasser Rabbat, Brent Ryan, and Janelle Knox-Hayes, moderated by Mark Jarzombek and Hashim Sarkis rounded out the conversation. Learn more about the series: http://mitsha.re/hOFf30mg5FlOn *** "Intellectual Commons At a time when digital communications are growing, the need for direct interaction is all the more vital. At a time when MIT is building bridges across schools and disciplines, we can no longer operate primarily at the scale of micro-units. This reflects neither the interests of the new generation nor the nature of the problems that the world is leaving at our doorstep. I invite you to come up with ideas that reflect the values that we hold in common. The vitality of the School—a community invested in shaping better commons for the world, from the environment to cities to public spaces and public art—is the extent in which we can exercise our collective imaginary." —Hashim Sarkis
Mining industry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:48 1 History 00:01:57 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:13 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:23 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:00 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:01 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:12 1.6 The Americas 00:16:14 1.7 Modern period 00:17:49 2 Mine development and lifecycle 00:20:32 3 Mining techniques 00:22:00 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:03 3.2 Underground mining 00:24:32 3.3 Highwall mining 00:26:16 4 Machines 00:27:38 5 Processing 00:30:22 6 Environmental effects 00:34:25 6.1 Waste 00:36:53 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:37:36 7 Mining industry 00:41:45 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:42:33 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:46:31 7.3 World Bank 00:48:38 8 Safety 00:52:16 9 Records 00:54:44 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.998962699879125 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 51 wikipedia tts
Surface Water:  Understanding the Legal Complexities
 
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Todd Votteler, Editor-in-Chief of the Texas Water Journal, moderated this panel of Toby Baker, Commissioner of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality; Austin water lawyer Doug Caroom; and Kevin Ward, General Manager of the Trinity River Authority of Texas. The panelists discussed the laws relating to ownership and use of surface water. In Texas all surface water is owned by the state with use determined by junior and senior water rights. Higher priority usage goes to whoever has owned a right to water for a longer period of time. Particularly during droughts, this system has proven inflexible, leading to both practical and legal challenges for water users statewide and for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the state agency mandated by the Texas Legislature to implement state surface water policies. From the Rethinking Texas Water Policy conference hosted by the Bush School of Government at Texas A&M University, April 6, 2018.
Views: 42 TAMUBushSchool
New Economic and Political Model to Change the Global Profit Culture of Excessive Greed & Corruption
 
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Press CC button for the SUBTITLES (bottom right of the video). For convenience CLICK ON TIME STAMPS: LEAD-IN TO PILLAR ONE: The Resource Oriented Economy to Peg our Currencies with; and the Supply-Demand-Resupply Inventory Network as the Job Creator = (34:51) PILLAR TWO: The People’s Power over Money and Credit—using Public Banks along with the Universal Single Payer system to Compensate Us All = (1:23:20) PILLAR THREE: The Culture of Transparency and Sharing—Open Patents, Sources, Information…Open Everything…along with the Free Public Neutral Internet = (2:37:23) DESCRIPTION: Details to Change Our Global Economic and Political Corporatocracy Culture; so that we reasonably transition the power and the levers of control from the Establishment to the hands of the People! READ THIS ARTICLE: Ascending The Globe Series Part 1: A Revelation for Mankind By Edward D.R. James / http://ascendingtheglobe.com PLEASE TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO TO OTHER LANGUAGES; and Let's Ascend the Global Economic and Political Culture...Together!!! FOLLOW ME: Twitter: https://twitter.com/edwarddrjames Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EdwardD.R.James Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/edwarddrjames Google+: https://plus.google.com/102613747434654135198
Views: 478 Edward D. R. James
Shale oil extraction
 
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Shale oil extraction is an industrial process for unconventional oil production. This process converts kerogen in oil shale into shale oil by pyrolysis, hydrogenation, or thermal dissolution. The resultant shale oil is used as fuel oil or upgraded to meet refinery feedstock specifications by adding hydrogen and removing sulfur and nitrogen impurities. Shale oil extraction is usually performed above ground by mining the oil shale and then treating it in processing facilities. Other modern technologies perform the processing underground by applying heat and extracting the oil via oil wells. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1807 Audiopedia
Recycling
 
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Recycling is a process to change (waste) materials into new products to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, reduce energy usage, reduce air pollution (from incineration) and water pollution (from landfilling) by reducing the need for "conventional" waste disposal, and lower greenhouse gas emissions as compared to plastic production. Recycling is a key component of modern waste reduction and is the third component of the "Reduce, Reuse and Recycle" waste hierarchy. There are some ISO standards related to recycling such as ISO 15270:2008 for plastics waste and ISO 14001:2004 for environmental management control of recycling practice. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 110 Audiopedia
Economy of North Korea
 
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North Korea's economy is a centrally planned system, i.e. the role of market allocation schemes is limited. Although there have been some small-scale reforms as of 2015, Pyongyang's basic adherence to a rigid centrally planned economy continues, as does its reliance on fundamentally non-pecuniary incentives. There have been reports of economic reform, particularly after Kim Jong-un assumed the leadership in 2012, but recent reports conflict over particular legislation and enactment. The collapse of governments run by communist parties around the world in 1991, particularly North Korea's principal source of support, the Soviet Union, forced the North Korean economy to realign its foreign economic relations, including increased economic exchanges with South Korea. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 874 Audiopedia
Natural resource economics
 
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Natural resource economics deals with the supply, demand, and allocation of the Earth's natural resources. One main objective of natural resource economics is to better understand the role of natural resources in the economy in order to develop more sustainable methods of managing those resources to ensure their availability to future generations. Resource economists study interactions between economic and natural systems, with the goal of developing a sustainable and efficient economy. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 844 Audiopedia
Nuclear power in the United States
 
01:04:16
Nuclear power in the United States is provided by 99 commercial reactors with a net summer capacity of 98,621 megawatts, consisting of 65 pressurized water reactors and 34 boiling water reactors, producing a total of 797 terawatt-hours of electricity, which accounted for 19.47% of the nation's total electric energy generation in 2014. As of 2015, there are five new reactors under construction with a gross electrical capacity of 6,218 MW, while 33 reactors have been permanently shut down. The United States is the world's largest supplier of commercial nuclear power, and in 2013 generated 33% of the world's nuclear electricity. As of October 2014, the NRC has granted license renewals providing a 20-year extension to a total of 74 reactors. However, no applications for an additional license renewal, which could extend nuclear plant operating lives beyond 60 years, have yet been filed. For about 22 reactors license is due to expire before the end of the next decade if no renewals are granted. The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant was the most recent nuclear power plant to be decommissioned on December 29, 2014. Another four aging reactors were permanently closed in 2013 before their licenses expired because of high maintenance and repair costs at a time when natural gas prices have fallen: San Onofre 2 and 3 in California, Crystal River 3 in Florida, and Kewaunee in Wisconsin, and New York State is seeking to close Indian Point in Buchanan, 30 miles from New York City. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 228 Audiopedia
United States Environmental Protection Agency
 
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The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or sometimes USEPA) is an agency of the U.S. federal government which was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress. The EPA was proposed by President Richard Nixon and began operation on December 2, 1970, after Nixon signed an executive order. The order establishing the EPA was ratified by committee hearings in the House and Senate. The agency is led by its Administrator, who is appointed by the president and approved by Congress. The current administrator is Gina McCarthy. The EPA is not a Cabinet department, but the administrator is normally given cabinet rank. The EPA has its headquarters in Washington, D.C., regional offices for each of the agency's ten regions, and 27 laboratories. The agency conducts environmental assessment, research, and education. It has the responsibility of maintaining and enforcing national standards under a variety of environmental laws, in consultation with state, tribal, and local governments. It delegates some permitting, monitoring, and enforcement responsibility to U.S. states and the federal recognized tribes. EPA enforcement powers include fines, sanctions, and other measures. The agency also works with industries and all levels of government in a wide variety of voluntary pollution prevention programs and energy conservation efforts. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1435 Audiopedia
Manila Bay
 
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Manila Bay is a natural harbour which serves the Port of Manila, in the Philippines. Strategically located around the capital city of the Philippines, Manila Bay facilitated commerce and trade between the Philippines and its neighbouring countries, becoming the gateway for socio-economic development even prior to Spanish occupation. With an area of 1,994 km2, and a coastline of 190 km, Manila Bay is situated in the western part of Luzon and is bounded by Cavite and Metro Manila on the east, Bulacan and Pampanga on the north, and Bataan on the west and northwest. Manila Bay drains approximately 17,000 km2 of watershed area, with the Pampanga River contributing about 49% of the freshwater influx. With an average depth of 17 m, it is estimated to have a total volume of 28.9 billion cubic metres. Entrance to the bay is 19 km wide and expands to a width of 48 km. However, width of the bay varies from 22 km at its mouth and expanding to 60 km at its widest point. The islands of Corregidor and Caballo divides the entrance into two channels, about 2 miles towards the North and 6.5 miles wide on the South side. Mariveles, in the province of Bataan, is an anchorage just inside the northern entrance and Sangley Point is the former location of Cavite Naval Base. On either side of the bay are volcanic peaks topped with tropical foliage: 40 km to the north is the Bataan Peninsula and to the south is the province of Cavite. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 225 Audiopedia
Baltic Sea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Baltic Sea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Baltic Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, northwest Russia, Poland, Germany and the North and Central European Plain. The sea stretches from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 10°E to 30°E longitude. A mediterranean sea of the Atlantic, with limited water exchange between the two bodies, the Baltic Sea drains through the Danish islands into the Kattegat by way of the straits of Øresund, the Great Belt, and the Little Belt. It includes the Gulf of Bothnia, the Bay of Bothnia, the Gulf of Finland, the Gulf of Riga, and the Bay of Gdańsk. The Baltic Proper is bordered on its northern edge, at the latitude 60°N, by the Åland islands and the Gulf of Bothnia, on its northeastern edge by the Gulf of Finland, on its eastern edge by the Gulf of Riga, and in the west by the Swedish part of the southern Scandinavian Peninsula. The Baltic Sea is connected by artificial waterways to the White Sea via the White Sea Canal and to the German Bight of the North Sea via the Kiel Canal.
Views: 29 wikipedia tts
Mining | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:51 1 History 00:02:00 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:18 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:31 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:15 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:23 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:36 1.6 The Americas 00:16:44 1.7 Modern period 00:18:22 2 Mine development and life cycle 00:21:09 3 Mining techniques 00:22:39 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:44 3.2 Underground mining 00:25:16 3.3 Highwall mining 00:27:02 4 Machines 00:28:27 5 Processing 00:31:18 6 Environmental effects 00:35:27 6.1 Waste 00:38:00 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:38:45 7 Mining industry 00:43:04 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:43:54 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:47:59 7.3 World Bank 00:50:07 8 Safety 00:53:52 9 Records 00:56:26 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9838512602070575 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or feasibly created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 11 wikipedia tts
Salton Sea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Salton Sea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Salton Sea is a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in the U.S. state of California's Imperial and Coachella valleys. The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California. Its surface is 236.0 ft (71.9 m) below sea level as of January 2018. The deepest point of the sea is 5 ft (1.5 m) higher than the lowest point of Death Valley. The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo Rivers, as well as agricultural runoff, drainage systems, and creeks. Over millions of years, the Colorado River has flowed into the Imperial Valley and deposited soil (creating fertile farmland), building up the terrain and constantly changing the course of the river. For thousands of years, the river has flowed into and out of the valley alternately, creating a freshwater lake, an increasingly saline lake, and a dry desert basin, depending on river flows and the balance between inflow and evaporative loss. The cycle of filling has been about every 400–500 years and has repeated itself many times. The latest natural cycle occurred around 1600–1700 as remembered by Native Americans who talked with the first European settlers. Fish traps still exist at many locations, and the Native Americans evidently moved the traps depending upon the cycle. The most recent inflow of water from the now heavily controlled Colorado River was accidentally created by the engineers of the California Development Company in 1905. In an effort to increase water flow into the area for farming, irrigation canals were dug from the Colorado River into the valley. The canals suffered silt buildup, so a cut was made in the bank of the Colorado River to further increase the water flow. The resulting outflow overwhelmed the engineered canal, and the river flowed into the Salton Basin for two years, filling the historic dry lake bed and creating the modern sea, before repairs were completed.While it varies in dimensions and area with fluctuations in agricultural runoff and rainfall, the Salton Sea is about 15 by 35 miles (24 by 56 km). With an estimated surface area of 343 square miles (890 km2) or 350 square miles (910 km2), the Salton Sea is the largest lake in California. The average annual inflow is less than 1,200,000 acre feet (1.5 km3), which is enough to maintain a maximum depth of 43 feet (13 m) and a total volume of about 6,000,000 acre feet (7.4 km3). However, due to changes in water apportionments agreed upon for the Colorado River under the Quantification Settlement Agreement of 2003, the overall water level of the sea is expected to decrease significantly between 2013 and 2021.The lake's salinity, about 56 grams per litre (9.0 oz/imp gal), is greater than that of the waters of the Pacific Ocean (35 g/l (5.6 oz/imp gal)), but less than that of the Great Salt Lake (which ranges from 50 to 270 g/l (8.0 to 43.3 oz/imp gal)). Recently, the concentration has been increasing at a rate of about 3% per year. About 4,000,000 short tons (3.6×109 kg) of salt are deposited in the valley each year.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Archaeology and Futurity Conference Session 3: Contemporary Encounters and Speculative Futures
 
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Friday, April 15, 2016 Session 3: Contemporary Encounters and Speculative Futures Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World In a particularly troubling academic climate that is witnessing departmental amalgamation and a relative dearth in full-time faculty hires, how does the discipline of archaeology envision its future? What is its role beyond the walls of the academy? Should archaeology be useful and, if so, for what purposes? This conference addresses archaeology’s potential role in contributing to pressing world problems including climate change, economic inequality, human rights, neocolonialism, and militarism. This conference also seeks to address how futurity plays a role in how archaeologists confront the past in the present. Through a departure from linear time, this conference will explore alternative notions of time, material vestiges of the past in the present, and embodied experiences that transcend temporalities. If we accept that archaeology is a discipline about the present, how are we to think about time and futurity? Session Participants: O. Hugo Benavides (Fordham University) "History, Capitalism, and Postcolonial Identities: An Archaeology of the Future" Christopher Witmore (Texas Tech University) "Hypanthros: How Might Archaeologists Approach that which is in Excess of Monstrosity?" Uzma Rizvi (Pratt University) "Future Participle: Towards a Speculative Archaeology" **Some images used by presenters are copyrighted materials NOT owned by individual presenters. In these cases, images are depicted under the terms of fair use.
Views: 304 Brown University
environment protection guidelines mining
 
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Contact Us For Help: http://wwa.stonecrushersolution.org/solutions/solutions.html Procedures for Processing Beneficial Use of Coal Combustion GENERAL GUIDELINES. Beneficial Use of Coal Combustion Byproducts (CCB) West ZMEia Division of Environmental Protection, Office of Mining and Reclamation, Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) Environmental Assessment Guidelines; Environmental Protection Orebody 32 Above Water Table Iron Ore Mine inquiry under s46 of the Environmental Protection Review of regulatory, Department of Industry and Science The Commonwealth’s regulation of environmental protection of uranium mining takes three environmental requirements developed under the EPIP Act assessment Gravel Watch Ontario, Noise Limits Limits on Noise in Ontario. Ontario law prohibits excess noise. The laws controlling the loudness of sounds (noise) in rural and urban Ontario provide reasonable EPA SIERRA LEONE The Issues With growing global environmental awareness and in pursuit of sustainable environmental management and development, the Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL Zambia Environmental Management Agency Zambia Environmental Management Agency standards and guidelines relating to the protection of air, Proposed Large Scale Mining in Sandwe, International Journal of Environmental Protection:Home International Journal of Environmental Protection (IJEP) is an uprising peer, reviewed, free, access international journal, devoted to supporting a global Bureau of Air Quality, Enterprise Portal Information PA STATE AGENCIES . Education; Emergency Management; Environmental Protection; Game Commission; Labor & Industry 1301.0, Year Book Australia, 2003 Mining and the environment Introduction The impact of the mining industry on the environment has been a public concern, with growing appreciation of the natural Environmental Issues & Policy in Jamaica: Pollution, Global Information about environmental issues in Jamaica and the Caribbean, including environmental policy, pollution, natural disasters and other environmental problems Mining Agencies & Resources, Associations, Organizations ICMJ'S Prospecting and Mining Journal Alabama Government Agencies & Resources BLM; Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Environment Law, Guide to Environmental and Natural What is Environmental Law? Environmental Law is a complex combination of state, federal, and international treaty law pertaining to issues of concern to the 4 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PLAN, Mackenzie Gas Project eis for mackenzie gas project section 4: environmental volume 7: environmental management protection plan august 2004 page 4, 1 4 environmental protection plan New Indonesian Environmental Law : New Challenge for Mining New Indonesian Environmental Law : New Challenge for Mining Industry. On October 2009, President Yudhoyono ratified Law of The Republic Indonesia Number 32 Libby residents satisfied with environmental protection Libby residents satisfied with environmental protection measures for Montanore Mine Posted: Jurisdiction, Coal Mining: Public Service , North Dakota Jurisdiction: Coal Mining. The Commission's Reclamation Division is charged with the responsibility of administering the State's program regulating the surface mining Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) Information Quality Guidelines; MSHA's Kids' Page; MSHA is announcing that it is issuing a regulation proposing that coal Office of Surface Mining Reclamation West ZMEia Department of Environmental Protection, wvdep.org DEP partners with WVU to study switchgrass on former surface mines. The West ZMEia Department of Environmental Protection and West ZMEia University have begun National Environment Management Authority, NEMA Uganda Sensitivity Atlas An environmental oil spill sensitivity atlas has been prepared to provide environmental planners with tools to identify resources at risk. The Environment Agency Protection Act, 2008, Sierra Leone No. 11 Environment Protection Agency Act, 2008 No. 11 Environment Protection Agency Act, 2008 7. (1) Where a person ceases to be a member of the Board Natural Resources Protection Act ("NRPA Page"), Bur. of Land The purpose section of the the Natural Resources Protection historical and environmental value of present and habitat or violate protection guidelines Environmental Protection Agency, The New York Times News about the Environmental Protection Agency. Commentary and archival information about the Environmental Protection Agency from The New York Times. Environmental Solutions Call (817) 793, 1484 For Environmental Solutions. Environmental Solutions can help remediate your environmental problems, or give you deta
Views: 107 rxlp qloga
Salton Sea | Wikipedia audio article
 
26:30
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Salton Sea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Salton Sea is a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in the U.S. state of California's Imperial and Coachella valleys. The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California. Its surface is 236.0 ft (71.9 m) below sea level as of January 2018. The deepest point of the sea is 5 ft (1.5 m) higher than the lowest point of Death Valley. The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo Rivers, as well as agricultural runoff, drainage systems, and creeks. Over millions of years, the Colorado River has flowed into the Imperial Valley and deposited soil (creating fertile farmland), building up the terrain and constantly changing the course of the river. For thousands of years, the river has flowed into and out of the valley alternately, creating a freshwater lake, an increasingly saline lake, and a dry desert basin, depending on river flows and the balance between inflow and evaporative loss. The cycle of filling has been about every 400–500 years and has repeated itself many times. The latest natural cycle occurred around 1600–1700 as remembered by Native Americans who talked with the first European settlers. Fish traps still exist at many locations, and the Native Americans evidently moved the traps depending upon the cycle. The most recent inflow of water from the now heavily controlled Colorado River was accidentally created by the engineers of the California Development Company in 1905. In an effort to increase water flow into the area for farming, irrigation canals were dug from the Colorado River into the valley. The canals suffered silt buildup, so a cut was made in the bank of the Colorado River to further increase the water flow. The resulting outflow overwhelmed the engineered canal, and the river flowed into the Salton Basin for two years, filling the historic dry lake bed and creating the modern sea, before repairs were completed.While it varies in dimensions and area with fluctuations in agricultural runoff and rainfall, the Salton Sea is about 15 by 35 miles (24 by 56 km). With an estimated surface area of 343 square miles (890 km2) or 350 square miles (910 km2), the Salton Sea is the largest lake in California. The average annual inflow is less than 1,200,000 acre feet (1.5 km3), which is enough to maintain a maximum depth of 43 feet (13 m) and a total volume of about 6,000,000 acre feet (7.4 km3). However, due to changes in water apportionments agreed upon for the Colorado River under the Quantification Settlement Agreement of 2003, the overall water level of the sea is expected to decrease significantly between 2013 and 2021.The lake's salinity, about 56 grams per litre (9.0 oz/imp gal), is greater than that of the waters of the Pacific Ocean (35 g/l (5.6 oz/imp gal)), but less than that of the Great Salt Lake (which ranges from 50 to 270 g/l (8.0 to 43.3 oz/imp gal)). Recently, the concentration has been increasing at a rate of about 3% per year. About 4,000,000 short tons (3.6×109 kg) of salt are deposited in the valley each year.
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
CAER Lab #2 Grand Opening Press Conference at UK
 
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The $20.8 million new laboratory at the Center for Applied Energy Research uses 54% less energy than similar facilities, and is in the process of becoming LEED Gold certified. It will allow the University of Kentucky to expand research devoted to Kentucky's growing renewable energy industries, including biomass and biofuels, electrochemical power sources (like capacitors and batteries), and distributed solar energy technologies. The facility was funded by a competitive grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce's National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's (ARRA) NIST Construction Grant Program. The award consisted of $11.8 million in federal funds, with matching resources of $3.5 million provided by the Commonwealth of Kentucky and $1.9 million from UK. An additional award of $3.5 million in state ARRA funds was provided by the Department of Energy Development and Independence to achieve LEED certification and ensure that this new laboratory is a model for energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.
The 58th Presidential Inauguration of Donald J. Trump (Full Video)  | NBC News
 
08:05:19
Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday, outlining his forceful vision of a new national populism and echoing the same "America first" mantra that swept him to victory last November. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News is a leading source of global news and information. Here you will find clips from NBC Nightly News, Meet The Press, and original digital videos. Subscribe to our channel for news stories, technology, politics, health, entertainment, science, business, and exclusive NBC investigations. Connect with NBC News Online! Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Google+: http://nbcnews.to/PlusNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC Follow NBC News on Pinterest: http://nbcnews.to/PinNBC The 58th Presidential Inauguration of Donald J. Trump (Full Video) | NBC News
Views: 10142997 NBC News
History of the United States (1865–1918) | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:23:02
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the United States (1865–1918) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The history of the United States from 1865 until 1918 covers the Reconstruction Era, the Gilded Age, and the Progressive Era, and includes the rise of industrialization and the resulting surge of immigration in the United States. This article focuses on political, economic, and diplomatic history. This period of rapid economic growth and soaring prosperity in the North and the West (but not in the South) saw the U.S. become the world's dominant economic, industrial, and agricultural power. The average annual income (after inflation) of non-farm workers grew by 75% from 1865 to 1900, and then grew another 33% by 1918.With a decisive victory in 1865 over Southern secessionists in the Civil War, the United States became a united and powerful nation with a strong national government. Reconstruction brought the end of legalized slavery plus citizenship for the former slaves, but their new-found political power was rolled back within a decade, and they became second-class citizens under a "Jim Crow" system of deeply pervasive segregation that would stand for the next 80–90 years. Politically, during the Third Party System and Fourth Party System the nation was mostly dominated by Republicans (except for two Democratic presidents). After 1900 and the assassination of President William McKinley, the Progressive Era brought political, business, and social reforms (e.g., new roles for and government expansion of education, higher status for women, a curtailment of corporate excesses, and modernization of many areas of government and society). The Progressives worked through new middle-class organizations to fight against the corruption and behind-the-scenes power of entrenched, state political party organizations and big-city "machines". They demanded—and won—women's right to vote, and the nationwide prohibition of alcohol 1920-1933. In an unprecedented wave of European immigration, 27.5 million new arrivals between 1865 and 1918 provided the labor base necessary for the expansion of industry and agriculture, as well as the population base for most of fast-growing urban America. By the late nineteenth century, the United States had become a leading global industrial power, building on new technologies (such as the telegraph and steel), an expanding railroad network, and abundant natural resources such as coal, timber, oil, and farmland, to usher in the Second Industrial Revolution. There were also two very important wars. The U.S. easily defeated Spain in 1898, which unexpectedly brought a small empire. Cuba quickly was given independence, as well as the Philippines (in 1946). Puerto Rico (and some smaller islands) became permanent U.S. possessions, as did Alaska (added by purchase in 1867). The independent Republic of Hawaii voluntarily joined the U.S. as a territory in 1898. The United States tried and failed to broker a peace settlement for World War I, then entered the war after Germany launched a submarine campaign against U.S. merchant ships that were supplying Germany's enemy countries. The publicly stated goals were to uphold American honor, crush German militarism, and reshape the postwar world. After a slow mobilization, the U.S. helped bring about a decisive Allied Forces victory by supplying badly needed financing, food, and millions of fresh and eager soldiers.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Chancellor Linda Katehi's Colloquium: Henry Jenkins
 
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Henry Jenkins spoke about "Democracy and Diversity in the Era of Spreadable Media" on May 1, 2014 as part of as part of the Chancellor Linda Katehi's Colloquium Distinguished Speaker Series 2013-14. Henry Jenkins was one of the first media scholars to chart the changing role of the audience in an environment of increasingly pervasive digital content and continues to be at the forefront of understanding the effects of participatory culture on society, politics and learning. As part of the MacArthur Foundation's Youth and Participatory Politics Network, he and a team of USC-based researchers are seeking to identify networks and mechanisms which have been especially successful at getting young Americans involved in the political process, mechanisms which often build explicitly on their existing investments in popular culture.
Views: 90 Linda Katehi
History of ecology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_ecology 00:02:20 1 18th and 19th century Ecological murmurs 00:02:32 1.1 Arcadian and Imperial Ecology 00:03:41 1.2 Carl Linnaeus and Systema Naturae 00:04:50 1.3 The botanical geography and Alexander von Humboldt 00:06:17 1.4 The notion of biocoenosis: Wallace and Möbius 00:07:05 1.5 Warming and the foundation of ecology as discipline 00:08:35 1.6 Malthusian influence 00:10:06 1.7 Darwinism and the science of ecology 00:12:31 2 Early 20th century ~ Expansion of ecological thought 00:12:44 2.1 The biosphere – Eduard Suess and Vladimir Vernadsky 00:14:14 2.2 The ecosystem: Arthur Tansley 00:15:19 2.3 Ecological succession – Henry Chandler Cowles 00:16:15 2.4 Animal Ecology - Charles Elton 00:17:23 2.5 G. Evelyn Hutchinson - father of modern ecology 00:18:37 3 Timeline of ecologists 00:18:48 4 Ecological Influence on the Social Sciences and Humanities 00:19:01 4.1 Human ecology 00:20:44 4.2 James Lovelock and the Gaia hypothesis 00:22:06 4.3 History and relationship between ecology and conservation and environmental movements 00:24:17 4.4 Conservation and environmental movements - 20th Century 00:32:16 4.5 Roosevelt & American conservation 00:33:30 4.6 Ecology and global policy 00:35:19 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9872076478515512 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Ecology is a new science and considered as an important branch of biological science, having only become prominent during the second half of the 20th century. Ecological thought is derivative of established currents in philosophy, particularly from ethics and politics. Its history stems all the way back to the 4th century. One of the first ecologists whose writings survive may have been Aristotle or perhaps his student, Theophrastus, both of whom had interest in many species of animals and plants. Theophrastus described interrelationships between animals and their environment as early as the 4th century BC. Ecology developed substantially in the 18th and 19th century. It began with Carl Linnaeus and his work with the economy of nature. Soon after came Alexander von Humboldt and his work with botanical geography. Alfred Russel Wallace and Karl Möbius then contributed with the notion of biocoenosis. Eugenius Warming’s work with ecological plant geography led to the founding of ecology as a discipline. Charles Darwin’s work also contributed to the science of ecology, and Darwin is often attributed with progressing the discipline more than anyone else in its young history. Ecological thought expanded even more in the early 20th century. Major contributions included: Eduard Suess’ and Vladimir Vernadsky’s work with the biosphere, Arthur Tansley’s ecosystem, Charles Elton's Animal Ecology, and Henry Cowles ecological succession. Ecology influenced the social sciences and humanities. Human ecology began in the early 20th century and it recognized humans as an ecological factor. Later James Lovelock advanced views on earth as a macro-organism with the Gaia hypothesis. Conservation stemmed from the science of ecology. Important figures and movements include Shelford and the ESA, National Environmental Policy act, George Perkins Marsh, Theodore Roosevelt, Stephen A. Forbes, and post-Dust Bowl conservation. Later in the 20th century world governments collaborated on man’s effects on the biosphere and Earth’s environment. The history of ecology is intertwined with the history of conservation efforts, in particular the founding of the Nature Conservancy.
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Outline of applied science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outline_of_applied_science 00:00:30 1 Branches of applied science 00:24:02 2 History of applied science 00:25:18 3 Applied science education 00:25:33 3.1 Degrees and certificates 00:26:04 3.2 Applied science schools 00:26:17 4 Applied science organizations 00:26:26 5 Applied science publications 00:28:36 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8747426912178008 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to applied science: Applied science – the branch of science that applies existing scientific knowledge to develop more practical applications, including inventions and other technological advancements. Science itself is the systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe.
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Participant Engagement and Health Equity Workshop - July 1-2, 2015 - Day 1
 
07:42:52
On July 1-2, the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the NIH Director (ACD) held a public workshop on participant engagement and health equity as they relate to the proposed PMI national research cohort. The workshop focused on the design of an inclusive cohort, building and sustaining public trust, direct-from-participant data provision, and effective and active participant engagement characteristics of a national research cohort of one million or more volunteers. The workshop built on the big science questions developed during the April 28–29 workshop at the NIH, digital health data perspectives shared during the May 28-29 workshop, and information on the strategies to address community engagement and health disparities in a large national research cohort gathered from stakeholders through a request for information. The workshop took place on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland, and was videocast. A full list of workshops being convened by the ACD PMI Working Group is available on the Events page of the NIH PMI website. Agenda and time codes: Welcome and PMI overview - Dr. Francis Collins - 00:01 Meeting overview - Ms. Bray Patrick-Lake - 29:30 Envisioning a Cohort that Is Participant-Driven, Inclusive, and Diverse - Dr. Tony Coles and Ms. Vernal Branch - 36:50 Public Perspectives about a PMI Cohort - Dr. Kathy Hudson - 1:08:05 Inclusion and Engagement Goals Related to Health Equity - Dr. Shiriki Kumanyika - 1:55:30 Challenges in Recruiting and Retaining Disadvantaged and Underrepresented Populations and Best Practices for Overcoming Them - Dr. Esteban Gonzalez Burchard - 2:54:35 Establishing Collaborative and Inclusive Governance in a Large Study - Dr. Spero Manson - 4:06:49 What Would a Direct-from-Participant Cohort Model Look Like? - Ms. Kathy Giusti - 5:34:15 Participant Perspectives on Data Sharing and Data Use - Dr. Sachin Kheterpal - 6:34:35 Wrap-up - Ms. Bray Patrick-Lake - 7:32:45
House Session 2012-06-05 (13:59:56-15:00:20)
 
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1) H.R. 2060 - Central OR Jobs and Water Security Act 2) H.R. 2336 - York River Wild and Scenic River Study Act 3) H.R. 1740 - To amend the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act to designate a segment of Illabot Creek in Skagit County, Washington, as a component of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System 4) H.R. 3263 - Lake Thunderbird Efficient Use Act 5) H.R. 241 - To authorize the conveyance of certain National Forest System lands in the Los Padres National Forest in California 6) H.R. 2512 - Three Kids Mine Remediation and Reclamation Act 7) H.R. 4222 - To provide for the conveyance of certain land inholdings owned by the United States to the Tucson Unified School District and to the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona, and for other purposes 8) S. 363 - A bill to authorize the Sec of Commo convey property of the NOAA to the City of Pascagoula, MS, and for other purposes 9) S. 292 - Salmon Lake Land Selection Resolution Act 10) H.R. 4282 - International Child Support Recovery Improvement Act
Views: 1056 CSPANHouse2012
Angel Nieves: Digital Humanities as Restorative Social Justice
 
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On October 29th, Prof. Angel David Nieves gave a talk at Amherst College to students, faculty, and staff from the Five Colleges that explored the building of a multimodal information environment to discuss cultural practices of remembrance, reconciliation and empowerment in the South African township of Soweto. The lecture engaged the ethics of 3D historical avatar modeling, digital testimonies and witnessing, and GIS reconstructions of contested spaces in the decades that have followed and echoed South Africa's apartheid. Thanks to Amherst Media for recording and editing this lecture.
War in Afghanistan (2001–present) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: War in Afghanistan (2001–present) 00:05:16 1 Before the start of war 00:05:25 1.1 Origins of Afghanistan's civil war 00:08:20 1.2 Warlord rule (1992–1996) 00:09:31 1.3 Taliban Emirate vs Northern Alliance 00:13:35 1.3.1 Al-Qaeda 00:15:25 1.3.2 Change in U.S. policy toward Afghanistan 00:18:17 1.3.3 Northern Alliance on the eve of 9/11 00:20:01 1.4 11 September attacks 00:21:26 1.5 U.S. ultimatum to Taliban 00:23:32 2 History 00:23:41 2.1 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan 00:26:54 2.2 Post-Anaconda operations 00:28:50 2.3 2003–2005 Taliban resurgence, war with Afghan forces 00:32:12 2.4 2006: War between NATO forces and Taliban 00:35:41 2.5 2007: US build-up, ISAF war against Taliban 00:39:47 2.6 Reassessment and renewed commitment 2008 00:42:29 2.7 Taliban attacks on supply lines 2008 00:43:11 2.8 US action into Pakistan 2008–2009 00:45:35 2.9 2009 US reinforcements, Taliban progress 00:45:46 2.9.1 Northern Distribution Network 00:48:02 2.9.2 2009 Increase in U.S. troops 00:50:36 2.9.3 Kunduz airstrike 00:51:02 2.9.4 Operation Khanjar and Operation Panther's Claw 00:52:08 2.9.5 Taliban gains 00:55:11 2.10 2010: American–British offensive and Afghan peace initiative 00:56:59 2.10.1 Troop surge 00:59:08 2.10.2 Battle of Marjah 01:00:01 2.10.3 WikiLeaks disclosure 01:01:02 2.10.4 Pakistan and U.S. tensions 01:01:55 2.11 2011: U.S. and NATO drawdown 01:02:02 2.11.1 Battle of Kandahar 01:02:57 2.11.2 Death of Osama bin Laden 01:03:17 2.11.3 Withdrawal 01:04:46 2.11.4 2011 U.S.–NATO attack in Pakistan 01:05:34 2.12 2012: Strategic agreement 01:05:57 2.12.1 Reformation of the United Front (Northern Alliance) 01:08:04 2.12.2 High-profile U.S. military incidents 01:09:20 2.12.3 Enduring Strategic Partnership Agreement 01:10:33 2.12.4 NATO Chicago Summit: Troops withdrawal and long-term presence 01:11:14 2.13 2013: Withdrawal 01:11:23 2.13.1 Karzai–Obama meeting 01:13:24 2.13.2 Security transfer 01:14:22 2.14 2014: Withdrawal continues and the insurgency increases 01:19:37 2.15 2015 Taliban resurgence 01:23:55 2.15.1 Kabul Parliament attack 01:24:54 2.15.2 Kunduz Offensive 01:26:43 2.16 Taliban negotiations, 2015–2016 01:28:05 2.17 Taliban infighting, 2015–2016 01:30:04 2.18 Taliban offensive in Helmand Province, 2015–2018 01:39:39 2.19 2016 01:54:08 2.19.1 2016 peace deal 01:54:56 2.20 2017 01:55:05 2.20.1 Events 02:05:06 2.20.2 Donald Trump's Afghanistan policy 02:08:11 2.21 2018 02:08:20 2.21.1 Events 02:11:13 3 Impact on Afghan society 02:11:23 3.1 Civilian casualties 02:15:46 3.2 Health 02:16:01 3.3 Refugees 02:16:36 3.4 Interpreters 02:16:59 3.5 Drug trade 02:19:30 3.6 Public education 02:19:57 3.6.1 Girls' education 02:20:28 4 War crimes 02:21:01 4.1 Taliban 02:21:56 4.2 Northern Alliance 02:22:36 4.3 NATO & Allies 02:26:46 5 Costs 02:27:55 5.1 Criticism of costs 02:28:57 6 Stability problems 02:31:39 7 Afghan security forces 02:31:49 7.1 Afghan National Army 02:35:30 7.2 Afghan National Police 02:36:11 8 Tactics/strategy of anti-government elements 02:37:08 8.1 ISAF conception of Taliban strategy 02:38:09 9 Insider attacks 02:39:26 10 Reactions 02:39:35 10.1 Domestic reactions 02:43:55 10.2 International reactions 02:46:03 10.3 Public opinion in 2001 02:47:34 10.4 Development of public opinion 02:50:46 10.5 Protests, demonstrations and rallies 02:51:42 11 Human rights abuses 02:51:57 11.1 Taliban 02:53:21 11.2 White phosphorus use 02:54:09 11.3 Human rights abuses against Afghan refugees 02:56:08 12 Environmental legacy 02:56:42 13 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The War in Afghanistan (or the U.S. War in Afghanistan), code named Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan (2001–14) and Operation Freedom's Sentinel (2015–present), followed the United States invasion of Afghanistan of 7 October 2001. The U.S. was supported initially by the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia and later by a coalition of over 40 countries, including all NATO members. The war's public aims were ...
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Malaysia | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Malaysia 00:04:45 1 Etymology 00:07:48 2 History 00:13:51 3 Government and politics 00:18:17 3.1 Political divisions 00:20:30 3.1.1 States 00:20:43 3.1.2 Federal Territories 00:20:59 4 Foreign relations and military 00:24:37 5 Geography 00:28:39 5.1 Biodiversity 00:32:20 5.2 Conservation issues 00:34:11 6 Economy 00:40:31 6.1 Infrastructure 00:41:48 6.1.1 Energy 00:43:06 6.1.2 Transportation 00:47:45 7 Demographics 00:54:09 7.1 Religion 00:56:39 7.2 Languages 00:59:01 8 Culture 01:00:50 8.1 Fine arts 01:03:28 8.2 Cuisine 01:04:46 8.3 Media 01:06:07 8.4 Holidays and festivals 01:08:05 8.5 Sports 01:10:31 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Malaysia ( (listen) mə-LAY-zee-ə, -zhə; Malay: [məlejsiə]) is a country in Southeast Asia. The federal constitutional monarchy consists of 13 states and three federal territories, separated by the South China Sea into two similarly sized regions, Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia (Malaysian Borneo). Peninsular Malaysia shares a land and maritime border with Thailand in the north and maritime borders with Singapore in the south, Vietnam in the northeast, and Indonesia in the west. East Malaysia shares land and maritime borders with Brunei and Indonesia and a maritime border with the Philippines and Vietnam. Kuala Lumpur is the national capital and largest city while Putrajaya is the seat of federal government. With a population of over 30 million, Malaysia is the world's 44th most populous country. The southernmost point of continental Eurasia, Tanjung Piai, is in Malaysia. In the tropics, Malaysia is one of 17 megadiverse countries, with large numbers of endemic species. Malaysia has its origins in the Malay kingdoms which, from the 18th century, became subject to the British Empire when the Straits Settlements became British protectorates. Peninsular Malaysia was unified as the Malayan Union in 1946. Malaya was restructured as the Federation of Malaya in 1948, and achieved independence on 31 August 1957. Malaya united with North Borneo, Sarawak, and Singapore on 16 September 1963 to become Malaysia. In 1965, Singapore was expelled from the federation. The country is multi-ethnic and multi-cultural, which plays a large role in its politics. About half the population is ethnically Malay, with large minorities of Malaysian Chinese (the second largest community of Overseas Chinese in the world), Malaysian Indians, and indigenous peoples. The constitution grants freedom of religion but recognises Islam as the established religion of the state. The government system is closely modelled on the Westminster parliamentary system and the legal system is based on common law. The head of state is the king, known as the Yang di-Pertuan Agong. He is an elected monarch chosen from the hereditary rulers of the nine Malay states every five years. The head of government is the Prime Minister. The country's official language is Bahasa Melayu, commonly known as the Malay language. English remains an active second language. In 2017, English proficiency in Malaysia was ranked the 2nd best in Asia (after Singapore) and the 13th best in the world.A member of the Commonwealth of Nations, Malaysia has had one of the best economic records in Asia since its independence from the United Kingdom with its GDP growing at an average of 6.5% per annum for almost 50 years. The economy has traditionally been fuelled by its natural resources, but is expanding in the sectors of science, tourism, commerce and medical tourism. It is also one of the few developing countries to heavily subsidise education and healthcare. Malaysian citizens are entitled to free public education up to secondary level and public tertiary education fees are subsidised by up to 90%. Basic healthcare services at government-run clinics with prescription cost RM1. Disabled persons, senior citizens and public school students are entitled to free healthcare. Malaysian healthcare services have been described as among the ...
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Nantes | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Nantes 00:02:22 1 Etymology 00:04:01 1.1 Modern pronunciation and nicknames 00:05:01 2 History 00:05:09 2.1 Prehistory and antiquity 00:07:19 2.2 Middle Ages 00:10:02 2.3 Modern era 00:13:03 2.4 French Revolution 00:15:21 2.5 Industries 00:18:05 2.6 Land reclamation 00:21:19 3 Geography 00:21:28 3.1 Location 00:22:44 3.2 Hydrology 00:24:30 3.3 Geology 00:25:52 3.4 Climate 00:26:55 3.5 Urban layout 00:29:40 3.6 Parks and environment 00:30:56 4 Governance 00:31:05 4.1 Local government 00:33:49 4.2 Heraldry 00:35:28 4.3 Nantes and Brittany 00:38:15 4.4 Twinning 00:39:20 5 Demographics 00:42:33 5.1 Ethnicity, religions and languages 00:45:38 6 Economy 00:49:36 7 Architecture 00:54:32 8 Culture 00:54:40 8.1 Museums 00:56:46 8.2 Venues 00:58:22 8.3 Events and festivals 01:00:55 8.4 In the arts 01:03:39 8.5 Cuisine 01:05:23 9 Education 01:07:21 10 Sport 01:09:34 11 Transport 01:13:27 11.1 Nantes Public Transportation Statistics 01:14:06 12 Media 01:16:41 13 Notable residents 01:17:55 14 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Nantes ([nɑ̃t] (listen)) (Gallo: Naunnt or Nantt (pronounced [nɑ̃t] or [nɑ̃ːt]); Breton: Naoned (pronounced [ˈnɑ̃wnət])) is a city in Loire-Atlantique on the Loire, 50 km (31 mi) from the Atlantic coast. The city is the sixth-largest in France, with a population of 303,382 in Nantes and a metropolitan area of nearly 950,000 inhabitants. With Saint-Nazaire, a seaport on the Loire estuary, Nantes forms the main north-western French metropolis. It is the administrative seat of the Loire-Atlantique department and the Pays de la Loire région, one of 18 regions of France. Nantes belongs historically and culturally to Brittany, a former duchy and province, and its omission from the modern administrative region of Brittany is controversial. Nantes was identified during classical antiquity as a port on the Loire. It was the seat of a bishopric at the end of the Roman era before it was conquered by the Bretons in 851. Although Nantes was the primary residence of the 15th-century dukes of Brittany, Rennes became the provincial capital after the 1532 union of Brittany and France. During the 17th century, after the establishment of the French colonial empire, Nantes gradually became the largest port in France and was responsible for nearly half of the 18th-century French Atlantic slave trade. The French Revolution resulted in an economic decline, but Nantes developed robust industries after 1850 (chiefly in shipbuilding and food processing). Deindustrialisation in the second half of the 20th century spurred the city to adopt a service economy. In 2012, the Globalization and World Cities Research Network ranked Nantes as a Gamma world city. It is the fourth-highest-ranking city in France, after Paris, Lyon and Marseille. The Gamma category includes cities such as Algiers, Orlando, Porto, Turin and Leipzig. Nantes has been praised for its quality of life, and it received the European Green Capital Award in 2013. The European Commission noted the city's efforts to reduce air pollution and CO2 emissions, its high-quality and well-managed public transport system and its biodiversity, with 3,366 hectares (8,320 acres) of green space and several protected Natura 2000 areas.
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Natural resource economics | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Natural resource economics Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Natural resource economics deals with the supply, demand, and allocation of the Earth's natural resources. One main objective of natural resource economics is to better understand the role of natural resources in the economy in order to develop more sustainable methods of managing those resources to ensure their availability to future generations. Resource economists study interactions between economic and natural systems, with the goal of developing a sustainable and efficient economy.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
History of the United States (1865–1918) | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:23:02
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the United States (1865–1918) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The history of the United States from 1865 until 1918 covers the Reconstruction Era, the Gilded Age, and the Progressive Era, and includes the rise of industrialization and the resulting surge of immigration in the United States. This article focuses on political, economic, and diplomatic history. This period of rapid economic growth and soaring prosperity in the North and the West (but not in the South) saw the U.S. become the world's dominant economic, industrial, and agricultural power. The average annual income (after inflation) of non-farm workers grew by 75% from 1865 to 1900, and then grew another 33% by 1918.With a decisive victory in 1865 over Southern secessionists in the Civil War, the United States became a united and powerful nation with a strong national government. Reconstruction brought the end of legalized slavery plus citizenship for the former slaves, but their new-found political power was rolled back within a decade, and they became second-class citizens under a "Jim Crow" system of deeply pervasive segregation that would stand for the next 80–90 years. Politically, during the Third Party System and Fourth Party System the nation was mostly dominated by Republicans (except for two Democratic presidents). After 1900 and the assassination of President William McKinley, the Progressive Era brought political, business, and social reforms (e.g., new roles for and government expansion of education, higher status for women, a curtailment of corporate excesses, and modernization of many areas of government and society). The Progressives worked through new middle-class organizations to fight against the corruption and behind-the-scenes power of entrenched, state political party organizations and big-city "machines". They demanded—and won—women's right to vote, and the nationwide prohibition of alcohol 1920-1933. In an unprecedented wave of European immigration, 27.5 million new arrivals between 1865 and 1918 provided the labor base necessary for the expansion of industry and agriculture, as well as the population base for most of fast-growing urban America. By the late nineteenth century, the United States had become a leading global industrial power, building on new technologies (such as the telegraph and steel), an expanding railroad network, and abundant natural resources such as coal, timber, oil, and farmland, to usher in the Second Industrial Revolution. There were also two very important wars. The U.S. easily defeated Spain in 1898, which unexpectedly brought a small empire. Cuba quickly was given independence, as well as the Philippines (in 1946). Puerto Rico (and some smaller islands) became permanent U.S. possessions, as did Alaska (added by purchase in 1867). The independent Republic of Hawaii voluntarily joined the U.S. as a territory in 1898. The United States tried and failed to broker a peace settlement for World War I, then entered the war after Germany launched a submarine campaign against U.S. merchant ships that were supplying Germany's enemy countries. The publicly stated goals were to uphold American honor, crush German militarism, and reshape the postwar world. After a slow mobilization, the U.S. helped bring about a decisive Allied Forces victory by supplying badly needed financing, food, and millions of fresh and eager soldiers.
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Denver | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Denver Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Denver (), officially the City and County of Denver, is the capital and most populous municipality of the U.S. state of Colorado. Denver is located in the South Platte River Valley on the western edge of the High Plains just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The Denver downtown district is immediately east of the confluence of Cherry Creek with the South Platte River, approximately 12 mi (19 km) east of the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is nicknamed the Mile High City because its official elevation is exactly one mile (5280 feet or 1609.3 meters) above sea level. The 105th meridian west of Greenwich, the longitudinal reference for the Mountain Time Zone, passes directly through Denver Union Station. Denver is ranked as a Beta- world city by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network. With an estimated population of 704,621 in 2017, Denver is the 19th-most populous U.S. city, and with a 17.41% increase since the 2010 United States Census, it has been one of the fastest-growing major cities in the United States. The 10-county Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated 2017 population of 2,888,227 and is the 19th most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical area. The 12-city Denver-Aurora, CO Combined Statistical Area had an estimated 2017 population of 3,515,374 and is the 15th most populous U.S. metropolitan area. Denver is the most populous city of the 18-county Front Range Urban Corridor, an oblong urban region stretching across two states with an estimated 2017 population of 4,895,589. Denver is the most populous city within a 500-mile (800 km) radius and the second-most populous city in the Mountain West after Phoenix, Arizona. In 2016, Denver was named the best place to live in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.
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