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Seabed Mining in the Deep Sea
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 0:16 - Main Presentation - Lisa Levin 28:24 - Audience Discussion Given the growing demand for deep sea metals created by electronic and green technologies, scientists are faced with decisions about whether to engage in baseline and impacts research that enables development of a new extraction industry, and whether to contribute expertise to the development of environmental protections and guidelines. Lisa A. Levin, distinguished professor of biological oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, addresses the ethical and societal challenges of exploitation in a relatively unknown realm. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [6/2018] [Show ID: 32160]
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea
 
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Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release. ----------------------------------------­­---------------------------------------­-­---------------- Next Animation Studio’s News Direct service provides daily, high-quality, informative 3D news animations that fill in for missing footage and help viewers understand breaking news stories or in-depth features on science, technology, and health. Sign up for a free trial of News Direct's news animations at http://newsdirect.nextanimationstudio.com/trial/ To subscribe to News Direct or for more info, please visit: http://newsdirect.nextanimationstudio.com
Views: 32885 News Direct
Hydrothermal Vents: What does the future hold?
 
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Since being discovered in 1977, Hydrothermal Vents have been a source of huge interest, due to their rich diversity and huge populations of new and specialised species in a comparatively baron and homogenous abyss. The mineral rich chimneys spew out a sulphurous fluid which forms an energy source for microbes, forming the base of these fascinating and unique ecosystems. Their isolation and mysterious interconnectivity reveals a fragile web of life that still has so much more left to be fully appreciated. The vents have also caught the attention of deep-sea mining contractors. 30 years on from their initial discovery, the global population has doubled and commodity prices have increased. Now, with new technological advances, deep-sea mining has become an imminent reality. Specialist researcher, Dr Jon Copley, talks through his experiences with Hydrothermal Vents and how irresponsible and short-sighted mining practices may have potentially catastrophic consequences on an ecosystem we still do not fully understand.
Views: 7655 Joe Feredayfilms
Sea mining could destroy underwater Lost City
 
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Scientists believe life on earth may have begun in a place called ‘The Lost City’, deep beneath the mid Atlantic ocean. But now a United Nations agency has assigned this part of the seabed to Poland for mining exploration purposes. But scientists say that miners may inadvertently destroy precious species and geological structures in their quest for minerals. Sky’s Economics Editor Ed Conway reports. SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/skynews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skynews and https://twitter.com/skynewsbreak Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skynews For more content go to http://news.sky.com and download our apps: iPad https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/Sky-N... iPhone https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/sky-n... Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/de...
Views: 9399 Sky News
ABC Catalyst S12E16 Deep Sea Mining
 
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A documentary segment about hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. No copyright infringement intended. Video remains property of ABC.
Views: 13523 ironfalcon100
Your future tech may rely on deep-sea mining
 
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As the demand grows for the metals that power electronics, we may have to look farther and farther for mining opportunities. The next big mining frontier is the deep sea: along the seafloor, mysterious vents shoot scalding hot fluid into the ocean. These vents are a haven for miraculous and unique sea life, but they’re also home to highly concentrated (and very valuable) metals. What happens if we decide that the metals are worth more than the life? Thank you to Ocean Exploration Trust for allowing us to use clips from their deep sea footage. You can follow their next expedition season here: www.nautiluslive.org Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2FqJZMl Like Verge Science on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2hoSukO Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2Kr29B9 Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/7ZeLvX Read More: http://www.theverge.com Community guidelines: http://bit.ly/2D0hlAv Subscribe to Verge on YouTube for explainers, product reviews, technology news, and more: http://goo.gl/G5RXGs
Views: 197771 Verge Science
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush
 
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Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
Views: 73623 Al Jazeera English
SEABED MINING
 
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The impacts of seabed mining.
Views: 547 GreenhouseCartoons
Exploring Our Sea Floor Production Equipment and How It Will Work
 
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Join us as we highlight our sea floor production vessels and show and describe how our first location, Solwara1, will work. This video is full of information and explores in's and out's of how all of our equipment will work together to mine the sea floor.
Views: 3493 Nautilus Minerals
Case study from Portugal: Emerging deep sea mining interests vs. hydrothermal vent conservation
 
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The video is part of the Workshop "Limits to Blue Growth in the Deep Sea" at the European Maritime Day, held in Bremen, Germany on 19 May 2014 organised by World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the Institute for the Law of the Sea and International Marine Environmental Law (ISRIM).
Views: 246 ISRIM
Changes in Benthos Community on Artificial Hydrothermal Vent Field Produced by Seafloor Drilling
 
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Regular monitoring was carried out from two weeks before the scientific drilling up until 40 months after the operation, aiming to observe changes in the benthos community of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fields (depth 1,060m). Prior to drilling, the seabed was covered by soft silty sediment, where Calyptogena clam colonies dominated. After the drilling operation, the clam colonies were completely buried under the drilling deposits. Then, at 11 months after the drilling, drilling-induced hydrothermal fluid discharges and numerous tiny chimneys were observed on the seafloor. [14]In addition, benthos communities dominated by Shinkaia crosnieri galatheid crabs were also found on the artificial hydrothermal vent fields. They have most likely migrated from the nearby vent habitats. The previously soft sediment had hardened probably due to chemical reaction of fluid composition, becoming rough and undulated with many fissures after 25 months of the drilling operation. This video shows how a new ecosystem was formed around new hydrothermal vent areas. Changes in Benthos Community on Artificial Hydrothermal Vent Field Produced by Seafloor Drilling - Emergence of New Habitats with Migration and Reproduction of Deep-sea Benthos - http://www.jamstec.go.jp/e/about/press_release/20150423/
Views: 1383 jamstecchannel
Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Bill Nye discusses the discovery of hydrothermal vents on the ocean's floor
Views: 264743 pheldd
Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Brief review of the processes at work at hydrothermal vents. Developed for an introductory-level Earth Science Course. To access versions with CC and scripts, go to: http://www.ccsf.edu/earthrocks Part of a 7-part Plate Tectonics video series: Part 1: Earth Layers & Isostasy Part 2: Plate Tectonics Basics Part 3: Plate Tectonics Global Impacts Part 4: Plate Tectonics and California Geology Part 5: Hotspots Part 6: Paleomagnetism Part 7: Hydrothermal Vents
Views: 5572 Earth Rocks!
World's First Deep-Sea Mining Project A Go
 
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Canadian company Nautilus Minerals has received the green light to start mining for gold and copper a mile down. The company will be working off the coast of Papua New Guinea. The job has environmental activists more than concerned. Mashable content. http://www.mashable.com LIKE us on FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/mashable.video FOLLOW us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/mashablevideo FOLLOW us on TUMBLR: http://mashable.tumblr.com FOLLOW our INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/mashable JOIN our circle on GOOGLE PLUS: http://plus.google.com/+Mashable Subscribe!: http://bit.ly/1ko5eNd Mashable is the leading independent news site for all things tech, social media, and internet culture. http://www.youtube.com/mashable
Views: 1752 Mashable
Ocean Minerals & Deep Sea Mining
 
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Deep Sea Mining opens up a number of opportunities for countries to get their hands on rare and useful ocean minerals. But is Deep Sea Mining safe, or will it cause more harm to the ocean floors? Watch to find out.. 1:38-1:46 Source :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1koFEKfmLw Music Credits : - Under Water - Silent Partner https://youtu.be/H3m94UQ6rcg - You by myuu https://soundcloud.com/myuu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Music for Creators https://youtu.be/DR9s88XLBf0
Views: 2796 GnY TV
Global Sustainable Electricity, Potable Water, and Mining from Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Our technology could provide sustainable base load electricity sufficient for all planet wide human needs with no fuel to purchase once each project is built. Hydrothermal vents can be found on the floor of oceans all around the world wherever geologic structures called divergent tectonic plate boundaries are located. These seafloor vents provide access to the natural heat generated in the Earth's core. Harvesting a small portion of the energy emitted by these superheated fluids could generate all the electric power used by human activity across the planet. Hydrothermal energy can be harvested utilizing the Marshall Hydrothermal Recovery System technology to generate renewable electricity in huge quantities. This sustainable, base load electricity could then be routed to the chosen market to be served via sub-sea cable, or plugged into a new state-of-the-art global sustainable electricity network such as that currently proposed by many groups, including China. From NBCNews.com... China Unveils Proposal for $50 Trillion Global Electricity Network http://www.nbcnews.com/business/energ... With or without a the development of a new global grid infrastructure being built, the market demands and available hydrothermal resources offer amazing opportunities for the Marshall system around the world. http://www.marshallhydrothermal.com
Views: 1469 marshallsystem
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4
 
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Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
Views: 26687 Arnie
The deep ocean is the final frontier on planet Earth
 
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The ocean covers 70% of our planet. The deep-sea floor is a realm that is largely unexplored, but cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to go deeper than ever before. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7 Beneath the waves is a mysterious world that takes up to 95% of Earth's living space. Only three people have ever reached the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean. The deep is a world without sunlight, of freezing temperatures, and immense pressure. It's remained largely unexplored until now. Cutting-edge technology is enabling a new generation of aquanauts to explore deeper than ever before. They are opening up a whole new world of potential benefits to humanity. The risks are great, but the rewards could be greater. From a vast wealth of resources to clues about the origins of life, the race is on to the final frontier The Okeanos Explorer, the American government state-of-the-art vessel, designed for every type of deep ocean exploration from discovering new species to investigating shipwrecks. On board, engineers and scientists come together to answer questions about the origins of life and human history. Today the Okeanos is on a mission to investigate the wreck of a World War one submarine. Engineer Bobby Moore is part of a team who has developed the technology for this type of mission. The “deep discover”, a remote operating vehicle is equipped with 20 powerful LED lights and designed to withstand the huge pressure four miles down. Equivalent to 50 jumbo jets stacked on top of a person While the crew of the Okeanos send robots to investigate the deep, some of their fellow scientists prefer a more hands-on approach. Doctor Greg stone is a world leading marine biologist with over 8,000 hours under the sea. He has been exploring the abyss in person for 30 years. The technology opening up the deep is also opening up opportunity. Not just to witness the diversity of life but to glimpse vast amounts of rare mineral resources. Some of the world's most valuable metals can be found deep under the waves. A discovery that has begun to pique the interest of the global mining industry. The boldest of mining companies are heading to the deep drawn by the allure of a new Gold Rush. But to exploit it they're also beating a path to another strange new world. In an industrial estate in the north of England, SMD is one of the world's leading manufacturers of remote underwater equipment. The industrial technology the company has developed has made mining possible several kilometers beneath the ocean surface. With an estimated 150 trillion dollars’ worth of gold alone, deep-sea mining has the potential to transform the global economy. With so much still to discover, mining in the deep ocean could have unknowable impact. It's not just life today that may need protecting; reaching the deep ocean might just allow researchers to answer some truly fundamental questions. Hydrothermal vents, hot springs on the ocean floor, are cracks in the Earth's crust. Some claim they could help scientists glimpse the origins of life itself. We might still be years away from unlocking the mysteries of the deep. Even with the latest technology, this kind of exploration is always challenging. As the crew of the Okeanos comes to terms with a scale of the challenge and the opportunity that lies beneath, what they and others discover could transform humanity's understanding of how to protect the ocean. It's the most hostile environment on earth, but the keys to our future may lie in the deep. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 2707860 The Economist
Global Sustainable Electricity, Fresh Water, and Deep-Ocean Mining from Marshall Hydrothermal
 
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[email protected], http://www.marshallhydrothermal.com. US Hydrothermal, LLC, a pre-IPO subsidiary of Marshall Hydrothermal US,LLC, is providing the world with the first and only patented solution to unlock the awesome potential from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The Marshall Hydrothermal Recovery System (MHRS) has the ability to provide utility scale base load electrical power, millions of gallons of desalinated water, and extensive mineral/metal/resource mining capability. US Hydrothermal, LLC provides expert consulting support and guidance to our partners in various countries to ensure smooth and efficient implementation of the MHRS solution. All inquiries welcome.
Views: 87467 marshallsystem
The Future of Ocean Exploration
 
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Biofluorescent sharks, deep sea mining, seafloor vents, underwater drones, and the disturbing effects of ocean acidification: exploring the future of oceanographic discovery. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation/ Video by Bryce Plank and Robin West Music: Timelapse (TDC Remix): MotionArray.com Drums of the Deep by Kevin MacLeod: Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400021 Consequence: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Hydra (TDC Remix): YT Audio Library The Stranger (Glimpse): https://soundcloud.com/glimpse_official Dark Night by Matt Stewart Evans: https://soundcloud.com/mattstewartevans https://www.facebook.com/Matthew.Stewart.Evans Featured videos: Mining: https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/video/2017/jun/28/robots-ocean-floor-deep-sea-mining-video Sonar mapping: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRQuID0IwbY Microbes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uktdKw_bJ_8 Biofluorescence: http://www.nationalgeographic.com/explorers/bios/david-gruber/ Susan Avery TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMQIgKyX3oU Triona McGrath TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJPpJhQxaLw Robert Ballard's EV Nautilus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOIOXvU0_qk James Cameron's Deepsea Challenger: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSfESqX-E84 Wired's profile on HOV's vs ROV's: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUzz_ilsFa0 Onboard the Okeanos Explorer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0G68ORc8uQ With 95% of the ocean floor unexplored, the deep sea is Earth’s last frontier. Its pioneers are scientists leveraging the latest technology to cast light on the massive and incomprehensibly dark environment that extends more than 35,000 feet down. Until recently, this world was known only to our planet’s most unearthly species. This is the story of our largest biome—and the people devoting themselves to understanding it and saving it for future generations. 40 years ago we discovered hydrothermal vents, which act as Earth's plumbing system, transporting chemicals and extreme heat from the molten core of our planet, helping to regulate the chemical makeup of the oceans. But this seemingly toxic environment is still home to life. Organisms that don’t need photosynthesis to survive can live down here. And with most of the seafloor left to explore, many species remain undiscovered. Studying these unlikely ecosystems can teach us about the earliest stages of life’s evolution here on Earth, and about the possibility of life on other planets. That’s why NASA is working with oceanographers to help plan the mission to explore Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. And because these vents form in active volcanic zones, they also help us better understand how landforms and moves over time. Plus, the sludge that’s constantly spewing from the vents contains some of the most valuable metals known to man. [Guardian video journalist] “In the deep ocean, where the water is as dark as ink, lie riches that no treasure hunters have managed to retrieve. They are deposits of precious minerals, from cobalt to gold, that have tantalized miners and nations for decades...” In 2019, a Canadian company will make the first-ever attempt at extracting these minerals. Using the latest technologies and massive, custom designed vehicles, it aims to bring up $1.5 billion worth of metals from a single site 25km off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Nautilus says it will minimize environmental damage by using infrared cameras and sonar to pinpoint the exact location of ore deposits, allowing it to shred less of the ocean floor. But environmentalists aren’t buying it. Preserving a sensitive ecosystem 8,000 feet underwater from the impact of mining is just not that simple. Unfortunately, we may not have much choice. There’s growing demand for these metals, but dwindling supplies of them on land. Cobalt — for instance — is used in jet engines, lithium-ion batteries, and the computer or smartphone you’re watching this video on—and the machines we made it on. But this age-old clash between miners and environment is really just one chapter in a much larger story of technology development—innovations aimed at maintaining the delicate balance of the increasingly threatened ocean ecosystem. One such tool is the EK80 broadband acoustic echo sounder. It uses a range of frequencies to paint a much more comprehensive picture of the amount and types of species living in a selected area of water.
Views: 35412 The Daily Conversation
Nautilus mining explained.VOB
 
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Activists talk about the proposed deep sea mining operations by Nautilus.
Views: 2759 OceansWatch
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode webseries dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This webseries addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Episode 1: Tools for Ocean Literacy is a cartographical survey of technologies that have contributed to ocean literacy and seabed mapping. Structured around a single shot along a vertical axis, the episode inquires about deep sea mining and the types of geologic formations where it is set to occur, particularly hydrothermal vents. Understanding the process of deep sea mining demands not only a temporal investigation – its main dates, legal, and corporate landmarks, and scientific breakthroughs – but also a spatial axis connecting the seafloor to outer space cartographic technologies. After all, we know less about the ocean depths than about the universe beyond this blue planet. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: http://www.deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ http://www.savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ http://deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 http://oceanolivre.org/ https://www.facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Ann Dom, Armin Linke, Birgit Schneider, Duncan Currie, Katherine Sammler, Lisa Rave, Lucielle Paru, Matt Gianni, Natalie Lowrey, Payal Sampat, Phil Weaver, Stefan Helmreich, and everyone who helped this webseries. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. Commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy. www.tba21academy.org http://www.tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282
Views: 2704 Inhabitants
Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents
 
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In the darkness of special places like the Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents, ocean research is bringing to light deep secrets about life on earth and potentially elsewhere in our universe. “Black Smokers” and hydrothermal vents create an ecologically-rich oasis in the deep sea where chemosynthetic creatures thrive and chemicals provide life-sustaining energy. At a depth of over 2 km, the management of Canada’s first Oceans Act Marine Protected Area (MPA) at Endeavour Hydrothermal Vents is challenging. An organism from this site holds the current record for the upper temperature limit to life: 121 degrees Celsius! Scientists strive to uncover secrets of the formation of Earth’s tectonic plates, chemosynthetic food webs and a potential glimpse of the origins of life on our planet, and perhaps its origins on others. In 2013, Fisheries and Oceans Canada who is responsible for managing Canada’s MPA’s, began collaborating with Ocean Networks Canada who has been operating a world-leading cabled observatory at Endeavour since 2009. ________________ We hope that you enjoyed the video! Check out the Ocean Networks Canada website to discover the ocean to understand the planet! http://www.oceannetworks.ca Want to see what we're up to? Follow us on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/ocean_networks And FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/OceanNetworksCanada INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/ocean_networks FLICKR: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oceannetworkscanada/albums
Views: 11753 oceannetworks canada
Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Hydrothermal vents found on the East Pacific Rise continuously spew hot, mineral-rich water that helps support a diverse community of organisms, including the giant tube worm, Riftia pachyptila. These tube worms have a symbiotic relationship with bacteria that obtain nutrition from the vent fluids.
Deep-sea snowblower vents
 
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In the ocean, there are places where it looks like it is snowing. These magical places are near undersea volcanic activity. The snow particles are clumps of bacteria that use chemicals to make food. Chemicals they use include hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to virtually all other life. Most other ecosystems on earth depend on organisms that require sunlight to create food. Vents release hot water, minerals, and chemicals from beneath hardened lava. The fluid is almost 30 degrees F warmer than the surrounding water. The bacteria live beneath the seafloor and are also released from the vent. These tiny one-celled microbes provide food for many animals. A thick mat of white bacteria builds up; little worms and crustaceans feed on it. Nearby, "black smoker" vents may form when vents spew minerals in water up to 750 degrees F. In time, an amazingly robust community with thousands of animals flourishes here. This video was recorded 480 km (300 miles) west of the Oregon coast at 1,516 m (4,974 ft) depth with remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts. Video producer: Linda Kuhnz Script: Linda Kuhnz, David Clague, Jenny Paduan Music: Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairies
Ocean Volcanoes May Hold Clues To Alien Life
 
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Scientists think studying 'extremophiles' in toxic hydrothermal vents could teach us about potential extraterrestrial life. Why Does Deep Sea Life Look So Strange? - https://youtu.be/A23wI4lvCgY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Get 15% off http://www.domain.com domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code SEEKER at checkout! Read More: What is a hydrothermal vent? http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/vents.html "Scientists first discovered hydrothermal vents in 1977 while exploring an oceanic spreading ridge near the Galapagos Islands. To their amazement, the scientists also found that the hydrothermal vents were surrounded by large numbers of organisms that had never been seen before." Deepest Hydrothermal Vents Teem With Strange Shrimp http://www.livescience.com/17823-deepest-hydrothermal-vents.html "Researchers exploring the seafloor south of the Cayman Islands have discovered the world's deepest-known hydrothermal vents, an underwater hotspot teeming with bizarre shrimp with light receptors on their backs." Just How Little Do We Know about the Ocean Floor? https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/just-how-little-do-we-know-about-the-ocean-floor/ "The entire ocean floor has now been mapped to a maximum resolution of around 5km, which means we can see most features larger than 5km across in those maps. That's the resolution of a new global map of the seafloor published recently by David Sandwell of Scripps Institute of Oceanography in San Diego and colleagues, who used some nifty tricks with satellites to estimate the landscape of the sea floor and even reveal some features of the Earth's crust lurking beneath sea-floor sediments." ____________________ Seeker inspires us to see the world through the lens of science and evokes a sense of curiosity, optimism and adventure. Watch More Seeker on our website http://www.seeker.com/shows/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Written By: Lauren Ellis
Views: 94792 Seeker
Pescadero Basin: Deepest hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California
 
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During a recent expedition to the Gulf of California scientists from MBARI discovered a new field of hydrothermal vents, the deepest yet discovered in the Gulf of California. These new hydrothermal vent fields were found over thirty-eight hundred meters below the surface in the Pescadero Basin, located off the east coast of Mexico’s Baja California, about one hundred miles east of La Paz. These hydrothermal vents result from a unique combination of geology and chemistry. Using a remotely operated vehicle, researchers found towering white columns emitting geysers of clear shimmering liquid with temperatures up to 290 degrees Celsius. The superheated water flowing from these vents starts deep underground. As the hot water rises, it flows through and reacts with the surrounding bedrock, becoming saturated with carbonate minerals, which build up over time to form the large chimneys that were observed. For more information go to MBARI news release: http://www.mbari.org/news/news_releases/2015/pescadero/pescadero-release.html
What is Deep Sea Mining? A web series. Episode 2: Deep Frontiers
 
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Inhabitants is an online video for exploratory video and documentary reporting. Follow us: Website: http://inhabitants-tv.org/ Facebook: facebook.com/inhabitantstv/ YouTube: youtube.com/channel/UCt0fB6C18nwzRwdudiC8sGg instagram: inhabitants_tv #inhabitants Written by anthropologist Stefan Helmreich, What is Deep Sea Mining? Episode 2: Deep Frontiers is a brief history about knowledge of the deep sea and its resources. It highlights the ambiguity of this history, as depictions of the deep changed throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Today, this knowledge informs discussions about the commercialization of biological and geological resources, with the deep sea fast becoming a zone of international dispute, opening up a debate about sustainable practices at sea. What is Deep Sea Mining? is a five episode web series dedicated to the topic of deep sea mining, a new frontier of resource extraction at the bottom of the ocean, set to begin in the next few years. Deep sea mining will occur mainly in areas rich in polymetallic nodules, in seamounts, and in hydrothermal vents. Mining companies are already leasing areas in national and international waters in order to extract minerals and metals such as manganese, cobalt, gold, copper, iron, and other rare earth elements from the seabed. Main sites targeted for future exploration are the mid-atlantic ridge and the Clarion Clipperton Zone (Pacific ocean) in international waters, as well as the islands of Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, New Zealand, Japan, and the Portuguese Azores archipelago. Yet, potential impacts on deep sea ecosystems are yet to be assessed by the scientific community, and local communities are not being consulted. The prospects of this new, experimental form of mining are re-actualizing a colonial, frontier mentality and redefining extractivist economies for the twenty-first century. This web series addresses different issues related to this process, from resource politics to ocean governance by international bodies, prompting today’s shift towards a "blue economy" but also efforts to defend sustained ocean literacy when the deep ocean, its species, and resources remain largely unmapped and unstudied. Stefan Helmreich is Professor of Anthropology at MIT. He is the author of Alien Ocean: Anthropological Voyages in Microbial Seas, and, most recently, of Sounding the Limits of Life: Essays in the Anthropology of Biology and Beyond (Princeton University Press, 2016). His essays have appeared in Critical Inquiry, Representations, American Anthropologist, Cabinet, and The Wire. What is Deep Sea Mining? is developed in collaboration with Margarida Mendes, curator and activist from Lisbon, Portugal, and founding member of Oceano Livre environmental movement against deep sea mining. It was commissioned and funded by TBA21 - Academy and premiered at the 2018 New Museum Triennial: Songs for Sabotage. For more information and links to NGOs, advocacy, and activist groups involved in deep sea mining visit: deepseaminingoutofourdepth.org/the-last-frontier/ savethehighseas.org/deep-sea-mining/ deepseaminingwatch.msi.ucsb.edu/#!/intro?view=-15|-160|2||1020|335 oceanolivre.org/ facebook.com/Alliance-of-Solwara-Warriors-234267050262483/ Acknowledgements: Stefan Helmreich, Matt Gianni, and everyone who helped this web series. Special thanks to: Markus Reymann, Stefanie Hessler, and Filipa Ramos. Commissioned by TBA21 - Academy. FB: TBA21–Academy @TBA.Academy Instagram: @tba21academy web: tba21.org/ tba21.org/#tag--Academy--282 #deepseamining
Views: 396 Inhabitants
Under Pressure - Deep Sea Minerals Resources
 
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Documentary examines the perspectives of different stakeholders involved with deep sea mineral resources in the Pacific.
Views: 667 Pacific Community
Julie Huber (WHOI) 1: Microbes, Fluids, and Rocks
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/deep-sea-life Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbes that dominate deep sea life in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. A mile or more below the surface of the ocean, microbes dominate the deep sea life. In this seminar, Dr. Julie Huber describes her research to better understand the microbial ecosystem in the rocky crust below the ocean floor. She begins the series by describing how reactions between seawater and the elements in ocean rocks enable chemosynthetic ecosystems to exist in the deep sea. She then introduces us to the tools scientists use to study microbial deep sea life below the ocean floor. In her second talk, Dr. Huber describes her research, which integrates microbiology, molecular biology, and ocean sciences approaches to characterize the microbial ecosystem below Axial Seamount, an underwater volcano off the coast of Oregon. Dr. Huber outlines how her group used environmental DNA and RNA sequencing techniques to analyze the crustal fluids (mix of ocean water & hydrothermal vent fluid) leaking from underneath the sea floor at three deep-sea vents. Her group determined that the metabolic potential of organisms was similar across vents (as indicated by DNA sequencing) but that there were larger differences in the “activity” of the microbes across vents (as indicated by mRNA profiling). Furthermore, Dr. Huber’s group identified vent-specific subseafloor microbial populations. In her third talk, Dr. Huber describes how a method known as RNA stable isotope probing (SIP) was used to characterize the metabolically active autotrophic microbes at an underwater vent at Axial Seamount. Dr. Huber’s group found that temperature influences the metabolic pathways, including the carbon fixation pathways, used by different organisms collected at the same vent. In addition, Dr. Huber’s group compared microbial activity across three vents and found that all three have different microbes that are active in a similar temperature environment. These findings suggest that subseafloor microbes prefer some environments over others and use different metabolic pathways in different environmental contexts. Speaker Biography: Julie Huber is an Associate Scientist of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, MA. Before joining the Oceanographic Institute, Huber was an Associate Scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory, also in Woods Hole, for 10 years. Her lab studies the microbial life found in the unique, and largely unstudied, environment of the deep seafloor. Dr. Huber received a B.S. in Marine Science from Eckerd College and a PhD in Biological Oceanography from the University of Washington. Huber has received a number of awards for her research including a L'Oreal USA Fellowship for Women in Science in 2007 and a Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellowship in 2017. Learn more about Huber’s research here: https://www2.whoi.edu/staff/jhuber
Views: 651 iBiology
Breaking the Surface - The Future of Deep Sea Mining in the Pacific
 
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The world’s first ever deep sea mining operation is scheduled to begin offshore from the Pacific island nation of Papua New Guinea in early 2018. In this short film we explore how the two Pacific Island nations of Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu are working together with their communities to manage the future opportunities and impacts associated with this emerging industry. W​hile deep sea minerals could provide much needed revenue for several Pacific Island nations, questions remain about the impacts of mining on the marine environment and the many communities that depend on it for their livelihoods.
Views: 2245 Steve Menzies
Under Pressure: Deep Sea Minerals in the Pacific
 
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Several Pacific Island nations are eagerly eyeing up the potential economic benefits from valuable deep sea mineral resources that have been discovered within their maritime territories. With a recent surge in commercial interest the Pacific has now become the centre of an international debate over whether the sustainable economic benefits for Pacific Islanders will outweigh the environmental risks of harvesting these precious metals from the bottom of the sea. This short film examines the issue from a number of key perspectives including; anti-deep sea mining NGO's; politicians; government agencies; deep sea mining companies and; the Secretariat of the Pacific Community.
Views: 12037 Steve Menzies
Hydrothermal vent
 
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The thing that happens in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent.
Views: 832 David Hsiao
Precious Metals from Deep-Sea Vents
 
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Video presentations from the Morss Colloquium. http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=28896 Deep-Sea Mining of Seafloor Massive Sulfides: A Reality for Science and Society in the 21st Century Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems are attracting considerable interest from commercial mining companies. Vent systems precipitate seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) deposits that are rich in copper, gold, silver, and zinc. Although commercial firms are targeting inactive SMS deposits, these deposits are so little studied that it is unknown whether they harbor unique species or ecosystems. The new frontier of deep-sea exploration and mining raises a number of questions about the sustainable use of these resources and potential environmental impacts. This Workshop and Colloquium was held on April 1 - 2, 2009, and brought together scientists, specialists in marine conservation, mineral economics, international law, the International Seabed Authority, national interests in SMS, and representatives of industry and NGOs to inform each other, and the public, about this important topic. The issue of deep-sea mining of SMS is of global importance, connected to the global economy, society, and the conservation of unique marine life.
Views: 1635 cfini72
Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Views: 3938 Lane Barnes
DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining
 
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Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461
Views: 326 Yeagerbr
Hydrothermal Vents: Whats does the future hold? (Eden Shorts entry)
 
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Since being discovered in 1977, Hydrothermal Vents have been a source of huge interest, due to their rich diversity and huge populations of new and specialised species in a comparatively baron and homogenous abyss. The mineral rich chimneys spew out a sulphurous fluid which forms an energy source for microbes, forming the base of these fascinating and unique ecosystems. Their isolation and mysterious interconnectivity reveals a fragile web of life that still has so much more left to be fully appreciated. The vents have also caught the attention of deep-sea mining contractors. 30 years on from their initial discovery, the global population has doubled and commodity prices have increased. Now, with new technological advances, deep-sea mining has become an imminent reality. Specialist researcher, Dr Jon Copley, talks through his experiences with Hydrothermal Vents and how irresponsible and short-sighted mining practices may have potentially catastrophic consequences on an ecosystem we still do not fully understand.
Views: 207 Joe Feredayfilms
Hydrothermal Vent Animals
 
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This video montage highlights some of the organisms commonly found at hydrothermal vents. Organisms shown include: 1. Small white octopus (Vulcanoctopus hydrothermalis) on top of a deep-sea octopus, 2. deep-sea shrimp, 3. "Spaghetti" hemichordate worm (c.f. Saxipendium coronatum), 4. Shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata), 5. Tubeworms (Tevnia jerichonana), fish (Thermarces cerberus), and crab (Bythograea thermydron). For more information about hydrothermal vents and their ecosystems, visit: http://www.divediscover.whoi.edu http://www.venturedeepocean.org http://media.marine-geo.org http://www.ridge2000.org Video courtesy of Dr. Daniel Fornari (WHOI). Copyright WHOI. Download this video at: http://media.marine-geo.org/video/common-biota-found-hydrothermal-vents-2003
Views: 5629 Ridge2000Data
Black Smokers: Ore Factories of the Deep
 
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BLACK SMOKERS: ORE FACTORIES OF THE DEEP At the bottom of the sea, in a depth of several thousand metres, black smokers bring up valuable raw materials from inside the earth. Their metre-high vents seem to give off smoke like under water industrial chimneys. CAMERA Maike Nicolai, GEOMAR Hannes Huusmann, GEOMAR ROV-Team, GEOMAR NARRATION Martin Heckmann GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
Views: 36456 GEOMAR Kiel
"Shocking" News from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Science for the Public, July 12, 2012. Peter Girguis, PhD, John J. Loeb Associate Professor of Natural Sciences, Harvard University. Professor Girguis discusses the unexpected and unique biodiversity at the hydrothermal vents. He focuses especially on the microbes in this environment that are able to metabolize using a process called extracellular electron transfer (EET). This remarkable system is not only instructive about extreme adaptations; it has potential practical applications.
Views: 637 Yvonne Stapp
NIOZ-STW: Study on the possible consequences of Deep Sea Mining on the ecosystem near the Azores
 
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(Nederlandse tekst na Engels) Can valuable mineral resources on the ocean floor be responsibly mined? To answer this question, we need to know much more about the deep-sea environments where these minerals occur in high concentrations. In April 2015, an international team of marine scientists sailed with the Dutch research vessel 'Pelagia' of Royal NIOZ to a site southwest of the Azores. Their mission: to collect data and perform experiments around a deep-sea hydrothermal vent field located on the Mid Atlantic Ridge. Sulfide minerals precipitating from the hydrothermal exhausts locally form massive sulfide deposits at the seafloor. In places where hydrothermal activity has ceased, these mineral deposits may become economically viable mining sites. Scientific understanding of the key geological, oceanographic and biological processes at those sites is of pivotal importance for policy makers to weigh the potential gain of valuable minerals against the potential environmental risks of deep sea mining. NL: Kunnen waardevolle mineralen op de bodem van de oceaan op een verantwoorde manier gewonnen worden? Om deze vraag te kunnen beantwoorden moeten we eerst veel meer te weten komen over de diepzeemilieus waar deze mineralen gevonden worden. In april 2015 vertrok een internationaal team van wetenschappers met het NIOZ onderzoeksschip 'Pelagia' naar een gebied ten zuidwesten van de Azoren. Hun missie: data verzamelen en experimenten uitvoeren rond diepzee-heetwaterbronnen op de Mid Atlantische Rug. Rondom de heetwaterbronnen zijn in de loop van de tijd metaalrijke mineraalafzettingen gevormd met potentieel economische waarde, maar ook wordt er een uniek ecosysteem aangetroffen met bijzondere levensvormen die aangepast zijn aan het extreme milieu. Afgraven van mineralen rond actieve heetwaterbronnen lijkt daarom vanuit milieu-oogpunt een onverantwoorde keuze, maar zou mogelijk wel plaats kunnen vinden op plaatsen waar de hydrothermale activiteit is uitgedoofd. Voor een verantwoorde beleidsafweging van economisch voordeel en mogelijke schade aan het diepzeemilieu is een goed begrip van de fysische, chemische, biologische en geologische sleutelprocessen absoluut onmisbaar.
Views: 1103 NIOZ
New Volcanic Sea Vents, Crawling With Creatures
 
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Smoke-like columns of mineral-rich water rise from a hydrothermal vent—one of ten active volcanic vents recently discovered in the Gulf of California (map), the long, narrow body of water between Baja California and mainland Mexico. The vents are the first to be found in the region despite many years of searching. Scientists had suspected active vents existed in the gulf, due to the region's volcanic activity, but until now they'd been hard to track down. (Watch video: What are hydrothermal vents?) The new "black smokers" were found using sonar-equipped robotic submarines, which were deployed during the last leg of a three-month expedition by California's Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). The team has been using sonar vehicles to successfully locate new vents in the northeastern Pacific since 2006. (Related: "Major Deep-Sea Smokers Found-'Evolution in Overdrive.'") On the latest excursion, sonar maps of the seafloor revealed the tell-tale structures of vent chimneys, showing the team just where to send its remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).
Views: 254 URsDailyMail
The Hydrothermal Vents - Neptune's Grave
 
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http://www.thehydrothermalvents.bandcamp.com http://www.facebook.com/thehydrothermalvents http://www.twitter.com/hydrovents Live in studio performance and video of "Neptune's Grave" by the Hydrothermal Vents: John Tielli and Tessa Kautzman Shot by Keith Pattington and Reuben Ward on Feb, 8th 2014. Dancers: Maude Lapointe and Anouk Thériault.
Views: 1894 Hydrothermal Vents
CEO Michael Johnston of Nautilus Minerals, Inc. (OTCPink: NUSMF)
 
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CEO Michael Johnston of Nautilus Minerals, Inc. (OTCPink: NUSMF)(TSX: NUS), joins Uptick Newswire to talk about Deep Sea mining & relevant technologies for Ocean Floor exploring.
Views: 436 Uptick Newswire
deep sea mining
 
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Views: 75 jmlast1
Destroying the Oceans, World’s First Deep Sea Mining Venture
 
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The world’s first deep-sea mining operation will kick off in early 2019 when a Canadian firm, Nautilus Minerals Inc., lowers a trio of massive remote-controlled mining robots to the floor of the Bismarck Sea off the coast of Papua New Guinea in pursuit of rich copper and gold reserves.
Views: 2051 Mary Greeley
The Strange World of Hydrothermal Vents
 
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Goksenin interviews NEPTUNE Canada scientist Steve Mihaly on the geology of 'black smokers'. Check out more cool videos on ONC's website http://www.oceannetworks.ca/sights-sounds/video Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ocean_networks Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OceanNetworksCanada For new videos subscribe here! https://www.youtube.com/user/OceanNetworksCanada
JPI Oceans: Ecological Aspects of Deep-Sea Mining
 
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In 1989 German ocean researchers started a unique long-term experiment off the coast of Peru. To explore the effects of potential deep sea mining on the seabed, they plowed in about eleven square kilometer area around the seabed. (c) GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel 2016
Views: 2114 GEOMAR Kiel