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Search results “Host-mediated inflammation disrupts the intestinal microbiota”
Functional dynamics of the gut microbiome in health and disease
 
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Functional dynamics of the gut microbiome in health and disease Air date: Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 3:00:00 PM Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures Runtime: 01:00:59 Description: NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Dr. Fraser's current research interests are focused oncharacterization of the structure and function of the microbial communitiesthat are found in the human environment, as part of the NIH-funded HumanMicrobiome Project, including projects specifically focused on obesity,metabolic syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, the interactions between thehuman immune response and the gut microbiome, and the impact of probiotics onthe structure and function of the intestinal microbiome. About the annual Rolla E. Dyer lecture: The annual Rolla E. Dyer Lecture features aninternationally renowned researcher who has contributed substantially to themedical as well as the biological knowledge of infectious diseases. Establishedin 1950, the lecture series honors former NIH director Dr. Dyer, who was anoted authority on infectious diseases. For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals Author: Claire Fraser, Ph.D., Professor of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology; Director, Institute for Genome Sciences; University of Maryland School of Medicine Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19272
Views: 3034 nihvcast
From the wings to center stage: How inflammation triggers a multitude of diseases - Longwood Seminar
 
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Streamed live on April 18, 2017 Inflammation is one of the body’s first lines of defense against disease. But there is growing evidence that chronic or acute inflammation can fuel the development of a range of chronic ailments, including autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative conditions, heart and metabolic diseases and more. In this seminar, Harvard Medical School researchers and clinicians explore the connection between inflammation and chronic diseases, and what can be done to reduce the risks. Speakers: Diane Mathis, PhD, Filip Swirski, PhD, Beth Stevens, PhD, and Steve Shoelson, PhD Like Harvard Medical School on Facebook: https://goo.gl/4dwXyZ Follow on Twitter: https://goo.gl/GbrmQM Follow on Instagram: https://goo.gl/s1w4up Follow on LinkedIn: https://goo.gl/04vRgY Website: https://hms.harvard.edu/
Dr. Matthew Walker on Sleep for Enhancing Learning, Creativity, Immunity, and Glymphatic System
 
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This episode features Matthew Walker, PhD, who is a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and serves as the Director of the Center for Human Sleep Science. Formerly, Dr. Walker served as a professor of psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. Walker's research examines the impact of sleep on human health and disease. One area of interest focuses on identifying "vulnerability windows" during a person's life that make them more susceptible to amyloid-beta deposition and, subsequently, Alzheimer's disease later in life. In this episode, we discuss how sleep plays a critical role in learning and memory, in the regulation of emotions including loneliness, in the function of the immune system, preventing the formation of amyloid beta plaques in the brain and Alzheimer's disease, glucose regulation and insulin sensitivity. We also discuss how certain dietary macronutrients affect sleep, the effect of sleeping pills and alcohol on sleep, the accuracy of sleep trackers, and so much more. Get the episode's show notes and transcript. https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/matthew-walker ▶︎ Get Dr. Mathew Walker's New York Times bestselling book: Why We Sleep. https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Why-We-Sleep/Matthew-Walker/9781501144325 ▶︎ Did you enjoy this podcast? It was brought to you by people like you! Become a member of the community by supporting the podcast with your own pay-what-you-can subscription. https://www.foundmyfitness.com/crowdsponsor ▶︎ Submit your raw genetic data. You can find the circadian report and APOE report at https://www.foundmyfitness.com/genetics.
Views: 61892 FoundMyFitness
Tim Ferriss on Ketosis, Microbiome, Lyme Disease, and Biomarkers
 
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick interviews 3-time New York Times best-selling author Tim Ferriss. They discuss what Tim's leading blood biomarkers are that he focuses on optimizing, the importance of tracking glucose along with ketones to make sure you don't confuse non-nutritional ketosis with the real deal, Tim's personal experience beating lyme disease and his insights on recovery, the origin and cause of "lyme hysteria", and how some of the symptoms of what is described as "chronic lyme disease" may actually be caused by a disrupted gut microbiome from uninterrupted, long-term use of antibiotics, what the "minimum effective dose" is when it comes to working out, and a little bit about Tim's workout routine and much much more. You can check out Tim's blog here: http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/ You can get in touch with him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram here: http://www.twitter.com/tferriss http://www.facebook.com/timferriss http://www.instagram.com/timferriss You can subscribe to his podcast by going here https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-tim-ferriss-show/id863897795?mt=2 (note: Like Tim, I am also on iTunes!) You can buy one of his many books here: http://www.amazon.com/Timothy-Ferriss/e/B001ILKBW2/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1439325281&sr=8-1&tracking_id=foun06-20 ... or his TV show here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/tv-season/the-tim-ferriss-experiment/id984734983 -------------------------------------------------------- Join my weekly newsletter (please!): http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=nutrigenomics Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=foundmyfitness Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness
Views: 263373 FoundMyFitness
Microbiota and Vaccines - Eric Brown
 
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July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404
Bacterial Colonization Factors ... Specificity & Stability of Gut Microbiota - Sarkis Mazmanian
 
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July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404
Demystifying Medicine 2014 - Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Who, What, When and How
 
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Demystifying Medicine 2014 - Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Who, What, When and How Air date: Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 4:00:00 PM Category: Demystifying Medicine Runtime: 01:53:18 Description: The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Author: Leonard Seefe, MD (NIH/FDA Formerly) Chris Austin, MD (NCATS) Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18336
Views: 3906 nihvcast
Hidde Ploegh (Boston Children’s Hospital) 1: Immunology: The Basics of Antibody Diversity
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/antibody-diversity/ Dr. Ploegh describes how antibody diversity lets us resist the multitude of infectious agents we encounter every day. He also explains how camelid antibody fragments are changing medicine. Talk Overview: How does our immune system protect us against all of the infectious agents and foreign substances we encounter? Much of the answer lies in antibody diversity.  In his first talk, Dr. Hidde Ploegh explains how B cells shuffle their genetic material such that regions of the immunoglobulin protein are rearranged. This generates the antibody diversity needed to recognize an almost infinite number of antigens. Interactions of B cells with T helper cells results in the formation of structurally distinct classes of immunoglobulins, further increasing antibody diversity.  T killer cells are primed to attack infectious agents when immunoglobulins on their surface recognize antigens presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Ploegh explains that by subverting the MHC pathway, viruses and cancer cells can evade the immune system. In part two, Ploegh describes how his lab takes advantage of the unique properties of antibodies from the Camelidae family (alpacas, llamas, camels, etc). In addition to traditional antibodies, these animals naturally make small, heavy-chain only antibodies (nanobodies). These molecules can be isolated, amplified in bacteria, and engineered for new applications. As well as using nanobodies to target viruses and inflammasomes, Ploegh explains how his lab uses labelled nanobodies for non-invasive, live imaging of cancer tumors in mice. These technologies have exciting implications in basic and biomedical studies. Speaker Biography: Dr. Hidde Ploegh is an immunologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. His love for immunology began when he was an undergraduate at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. As a student, he wrote a letter to renowned immunologist Jon van Rood but never heard back. However, as an undergraduate researcher, he had an opportunity to work with Dr. Jack Strominger at Harvard University for 6 months. The experience was so great that after earning a BS and Masters in Biology and Chemistry from the University of Groningen, he returned to Strominger’s lab for his graduate studies. Ironically, his thesis committee chair ended up being Jon van Rood. Ploegh ultimately received his PhD from Leiden University in the Netherlands. Following graduate school, Ploegh was highly sought after by several institutions. Fresh from his PhD, Ploegh was first offered a position as a junior group leader in immunology at the University of Cologne, Germany in 1980. Since then, he has worked at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard Medical School and most recently, the Whitehead Institute. His accolades, in addition to prestigious awards, include induction into the European Molecular Biology Organization (1986), the American Academy of Arts and Science (2002) and the National Academy of Sciences (2012). He has contributed to over 500 papers. Learn more about his lab and research here: http://www.childrenshospital.org/research-and-innovation/research/programs/program-in-cellular-and-molecular-medicine/faculty-and-research/hidde-ploegh/lab-highlights
Views: 3975 iBiology
The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 3)
 
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The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 3) Air date: Friday, August 18, 2017, 8:15:00 AM Category: Conferences Runtime: 04:59:15 Description: The 2017 NIH-wide microbiome workshop will strive to cover advances that reveal the specific ways in which the microbiota influences the physiology of the host, both in a healthy and in a diseased state and how the microbiota may be manipulated, either at the community, population, organismal or molecular level, to maintain and/or improve the health of the host. The goal will be to seek input from a trans-disciplinary group of scientists to identify 1) knowledge gaps, 2) technical hurdles, 3) new approaches and 4) research opportunities that will inform the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies based on host/microbiome interactions over the next ten years. Author: NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23424
Views: 1983 nihvcast
Perspective on autoimmunity: a view from the ANCA vasculitis looking glass
 
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Perspective on autoimmunity: a view from the ANCA vasculitis looking glass Air date: Wednesday, November 2, 2016, 3:00:00 PM Category: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon Lectures Runtime: 00:59:24 Description: NIH Director's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Astute Clinician Lecture Dr. Falk's research probes questions focused on immune-mediated kidney diseases, especially glomerulonephritis. His clinical and basic science interests include both anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) glomerulonephritis and small vessel vasculitis (SVV). A central objective of Falk's research is elucidating the causes of ANCA necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. Unraveling the cause of this disease requires considering a number of factors involved in the development of ANCA glomerulonephritis. Dr. Falk conceptualizes this process as opening the vasculitis lock with a key that has a number of "ridges and valleys" analogous to those factors that contribute to the development of this autoimmune disease. Dr. Falk participates in a research group that, in a large study over the last four years, has revealed a number of avenues of investigation and new approaches to ongoing questions that pertain not only to ANCA glomerulonephritis, but to the general fields of autoimmunity, inflammation and basic neutrophil and monocyte biology. This annual lecture started in 1998 and honors a U.S. scientist who has observed an unusual occurrence, and by investigating it, has opened an important new avenue of research. The lectureship exemplifies how astute clinical observations can lead to innovative research. Speakers are selected by the NIH Clinical Center. For more information go to https://oir.nih.gov/wals/2016-2017 Debug: Show Debug Author: Ronald J. Falk, M.D., Hugh and Nan Cullman Eminent Professor and Chair, Department of Medicine at University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19984
Views: 1826 nihvcast
Jack Gilbert, PhD Presenting at Nobel Conference 54
 
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Dr. Jack Gilbert, Professor in Department of Surgery and Faculty Director, The Microbiome Center, University of Chicago. Through the Earth Microbiome Project (EMP), Jack Gilbert and his colleagues are using crowdsourcing techniques to study the microbial makeup of the planet. The EMP is revealing vast diversity in the microbial communities in our soil. Gilbert explores what we can learn from this diversity, and what the variations in these communities mean for humans.
The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 2)
 
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The Human Microbiome: Emerging Themes at the Horizon of the 21st Century (Day 2) Air date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 8:15:00 AM Category: Conferences Runtime: 07:32:24 Description: The 2017 NIH-wide microbiome workshop will strive to cover advances that reveal the specific ways in which the microbiota influences the physiology of the host, both in a healthy and in a diseased state and how the microbiota may be manipulated, either at the community, population, organismal or molecular level, to maintain and/or improve the health of the host. The goal will be to seek input from a trans-disciplinary group of scientists to identify 1) knowledge gaps, 2) technical hurdles, 3) new approaches and 4) research opportunities that will inform the development of novel prevention and treatment strategies based on host/microbiome interactions over the next ten years. Author: NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23423
Views: 1845 nihvcast
Wound Healing to Longevity: Microbe-Induced Immune Proficiency in Human Health - Susan Erdman
 
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July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404
Jody Rosenblatt (HCI, U. Utah) 3: Pathologies resulting from aberrant epithelial extrusion
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/cell-biology/epithelial-homeostasis/#part-3 Part 1: Epithelial homeostasis: Maintaining an intact epithelial barrier requires a balance between cell death and cell division. Rosenblatt describes the signals that regulate epithelial homeostasis. Part 2: Death by epithelial cell extrusion: Dying cells are squeezed or extruded out of epithelia by the contraction of neighboring cells. Extrusion can also remove live cells when cells become too crowded. Part 3: Aberrant epithelial extrusion and disease: When the regulation of epithelial extrusion goes awry, diseases such as asthma or cancer can result. Talk Overview: Both our entire body and all of our organs are covered with a protective layer of epithelial cells. These cells are constantly replicating and dying and a balance between cell death and division is critical to maintain epithelial homeostasis. Too much cell death can lead to gaps in the epithelial barrier while excess division can result in the formation of epithelial tumors. Rosenblatt is interested in understanding the signals that regulate epithelial homeostasis. In Part 1 of her talk, Rosenblatt describes her lab’s novel finding that stretching epithelial cells causes a stretch-activated Ca2+ channel (Piezo1) to open, increasing intracellular Ca2+ levels and stimulating pathways that trigger cell division. How do epithelial cells die and not leave a hole in the protective membrane? In Part 2, Rosenblatt explains how her lab discovered epithelial cell extrusion or the process of squeezing dying cells out of the epithelial monolayer. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is released by extruded cells and stimulates neighboring cells to form an actomyosin ring. Contraction of the ring squeezes out the apoptotic cell. Interestingly, crowding can activate extrusion of live cells that go on to die once they lose contact with other cells. Rosenblatt’s lab found that live, extruded cells also release S1P. S1P release is regulated by the same stretch activated channel, Piezo1, as is cell division. These data provide a mechanism by which epithelial barrier function and constant cell densities are maintained. In her third talk, Rosenblatt describes how epithelial diseases such as asthma or cancer can result from aberrant cell extrusion. Too much cell extrusion can lead to holes in the epithelia and compromised barrier function, as seen in asthma. Too little extrusion can lead to masses of cells accumulating on epithelial surfaces, a process likely at work in some cancers. Rosenblatt also describes work from her lab that disrupted S1P signaling may play a key role in causing cancers of epithelial origin, such as pancreatic cancer. She also explains that extrusion from the basal face of an epithelial layer, rather than the usual apical extrusion, is likely an important first step in driving cancer metastasis. Speaker Biography: Dr. Jody Rosenblatt received her BA with honors from the University of California, Berkeley and, after a short stint at Chiron Corporation, she moved across the bay to work as a technician with David Morgan at the University of California, San Francisco. Rosenblatt stayed on at UCSF for her PhD where she worked in Tim Mitchison’s lab. She then moved to University College London for post-doctoral training. It was at UCL that Rosenblatt discovered extrusion and its role in epithelial homeostasis. Currently, Rosenblatt is an Associate Professor in the Department of Oncological Sciences at the University of Utah School of Medicine and an Investigator of the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Her lab studies cell death and division in epithelia. Learn more about Dr. Rosenblatt’s research here: http://healthcare.utah.edu/huntsmancancerinstitute/research/labs/rosenblatt/
Views: 1469 iBiology
IONTOX & MatTek Webinar
 
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On May 2nd, MatTek Corporation and IONTOX scientists hosted a joint webinar discussing how using integrated organ systems in conjunction with MatTek’s EpiIntestinal™ are being used to study cholestatic drug-induced liver injury in vitro. Watch the video to learn about the wide-ranging potential and implications of this technology for medical studies and future research.
Views: 119 MatTek Corporation
Tick-Borne Disease Working Group Meeting - May 10, 2018
 
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Part 1 (Welcome, Introductions, Overview) - https://bit.ly/2ydmepe Part 2 (Disease Vectors, Surveillance, and Prevention Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2Nq6UeC Part 3 (Pathogenesis, Transmission, and Treatment Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2NqoNdo Part 4 (Testing and Diagnostics Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2NpTL57 Part 5 (Access to Care and Support to Patients Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2P9BsCV Part 6 (Vaccines and Therapeutics Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2O6v5nu Part 7 (Other Tick-Borne Diseases and Co-Infections Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2CuhQqD Part 8 (Public Comments and Next Steps) - https://bit.ly/2OGKLgM -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html