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Mining the New American West | National Geographic
 
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For centuries the American West has been the realm of cowboys, miners and frontiersman. Since 1872 mining companies have been reaping the benefit of an antiquated law allowing mining companies to purchase land at bargain prices, such as the recent acquisition of an entire mountain for only 875 dollars. Wild Chronicles follows what happens when 19th century laws are faced up against 21st century sensibilities. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Mining the New American West | National Geographic https://youtu.be/LYWVqDLJCoo National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 95120 National Geographic
Mining
 
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019 - Mining In this video Paul Andersen explains how mining is used to extract valuable minerals from the Earth's crust. Surface and subsurface mining are used to extract ore which is then processed. A discussion of ecosystem impacts and legislation is also included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Cateb, M. (2010). Português: Cobre e latão para soldas. Lingote de prata 950 e chapa de prata. Liga para ser adicionada à prata, com cobre e germânio. Grânulos de prata fina. Foto : Mauro Cateb, joalheiro brasileiro. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Metals_for_jewellery.jpg English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg File:MKingHubbert.jpg. (2011, September 13). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:MKingHubbert.jpg&oldid=450215564 Jones, N. (2007). English: Sand and gravel strata on the southern edge of Coxford Wood The sand and gravel quarry goes right up to the edge of wood. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sand_and_gravel_strata_on_the_southern_edge_of_Coxford_Wood_-_geograph.org.uk_-_610732.jpg Jyi1693. (2006). English: Seawater photographed from aboard the MV Virgo out of Singapore, 2006. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sea_water_Virgo.jpg KVDP. (2009). English: A schematic showing the locations of certain ores in the world. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simplified_world_mining_map_1.png printer, -G. F. Nesbitt & Co. (1850). English: Sailing card for the clipper ship California, depicting scenes from the California gold rush. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:California_Clipper_500.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg Vance, R. H. (1850). English: “Photomechanical reproduction of the 1850(?) daguerreotype by R. H. Vance shows James Marshall standing in front of Sutter’s sawmill, Coloma, California, where he discovered gold.” Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sutters_Mill.jpg
Views: 90620 Bozeman Science
Lecture_39 Environmental Laws
 
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Lecture Series on Environmental Air Pollution by Prof. Mukesh Sharma Department of Civil Engineering IIT Kanpur
Views: 56699 nptelhrd
Contract Law 76 V Hadley v Baxendale
 
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V. Remedies C. Breach by the Seller Hadley v. Baxendale (broken crank shaft shipment) To access case file, copy and paste link into browser -ianayres.com/sites/default/files/files/Hadley%20v_%20Baxendale.docx These video lectures are taken from Prof. Ayres’ Coursera Courses: American Contract Law I & II. All lectures plus assessments, animations, and discussion forums will me made available on Coursera.org Fall 2017!
Views: 3528 YaleCourses
Introduction : Land Acquisition Act 2013
 
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PREAMBLE a humane, participative, informed and transparent process for land acquisition for industrialisation, development of essential infrastructural facilities and urbanisation with the least disturbance to the owners of the land and provide just and fair compensation Gazette Notification - Act shall come into force from 1st January, 2014. Section 2 - Application of Act (1) The provisions of this Act relating to land acquisition, compensation, rehabilitation and resettlement, shall apply, when the appropriate Government acquires land for its own use, hold and control, for public purpose, including:— (a) for strategic purposes relating to naval, military, air force, and armed forces; or (b) for infrastructure projects, which includes the following, namely:— (i) activities excluding private hospitals, private educational institutions and private hotels; (ii) projects involving agro-processing; (iii) mining activities; (iv) water harvesting, (v) educational and research schemes or institutions; (c) project for project affected families; (e) land for residential purposes; (2) :— (a) for public private partnership; (b) for private companies for public purpose— (i) private companies, the prior consent of at least eighty per cent. of those affected families, as defined in sub-clauses (i) and (v) of clause (c) of section 3; and (ii) public private partnership projects, the prior consent of at least seventy per cent. of those affected families, as defined in sub-clauses (i) and (v) of clause (c) of section 3, (3) rehabilitation and resettlement, where,— (a) a private company purchases land, through private negotiations with the owner of the land in accordance with the provisions of section 46; (b) a private company requests the appropriate Government for acquisition of a part of an area for a public purpose: Section 3 - Definitions In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires,— (a) “Administrator” means an officer appointed for the purpose of rehabilitation and resettlement of affected families under sub-section (1) of section 43; (c) “affected family” includes- (i) a family whose land or other immovable property has been acquired; (ii) a family of agricultural labourers, tenants; (iii) the Scheduled Tribes and traditional forest dwellers; (d) “agricultural land” means land used for the purpose of— (i) agriculture or horticulture; (ii) dairy farming, poultry fanning, pisciculture, sericulture, seed farming breeding of livestock or nursery growing medicinal herbs; (iii) raising of crops, trees, grass or garden produce; and (iv) land used for the grazing of cattle; (f) “Authority” means the Land Acquisition and Rehabilitation and Resettlement Authority established under section 51; (i) “cost of acquisition” includes— (i) amount of compensation, any enhanced compensation and interest payable thereon; (ii) demurrage paid for damages caused to standing crops; (v) cost of rehabilitation and resettlement in accordance with this Act; (u) “market value” means the value of land determined in accordance with section 26;
Views: 8915 Indian Law School
Mining law | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Mining law 00:00:21 1 Topics 00:00:30 1.1 Ownership 00:01:08 1.2 Support 00:01:40 2 By country 00:01:56 2.1 Mining law in German-speaking countries 00:03:20 2.1.1 Today 00:04:29 2.2 Mining law in English-speaking countries 00:05:34 2.3 Mining law in French-speaking countries 00:05:49 3 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining law is the branch of law relating to the legal requirements affecting minerals and mining. Mining law covers several basic topics, including the ownership of the mineral resource and who can work them. Mining is also affected by various regulations regarding the health and safety of miners, as well as the environmental impact of mining.
Views: 1 Subhajit Sahu
American West in a Nutshell
 
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A purveyor of fine histories tries to cover the American West course in 5 minutes...and fails!
Views: 30495 John Stanier
GCSE American West 1840-1895 Revision
 
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A revision resource for Year 11 taking the American West Exam this year. This gives an overview of some of the main themes to help refresh your mind before the exam. The words of the song are relevant too as they cover the story of a young Indian warrior struggling and failing to keep his culture alive - 'Indian Sunset' by Elton John, 1971.
Views: 24994 GatewayHistory
Law of Contract - State of M.P. vs Hasunji & Sons
 
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Reference – A.I.R 1957 Madhya Pradesh 135 Subject – In this case the binding effect of a contract on the parties thereto is mentioned when an agreement is being made with full knowledge of the facts implied therein and when both the parties are aware of its conditions.
Mining industry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:48 1 History 00:01:57 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:13 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:23 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:00 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:01 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:12 1.6 The Americas 00:16:14 1.7 Modern period 00:17:49 2 Mine development and lifecycle 00:20:32 3 Mining techniques 00:22:00 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:03 3.2 Underground mining 00:24:32 3.3 Highwall mining 00:26:16 4 Machines 00:27:38 5 Processing 00:30:22 6 Environmental effects 00:34:25 6.1 Waste 00:36:53 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:37:36 7 Mining industry 00:41:45 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:42:33 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:46:31 7.3 World Bank 00:48:38 8 Safety 00:52:16 9 Records 00:54:44 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.998962699879125 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 58 wikipedia tts
PERFORMANCE OF CONTRACT
 
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PERFORMANCE OF CONTRACT Every contract consists of reciprocal promises. The parties to contract must either perform or offer to perform their respective promises. Offer to perform (Tender) 1. Unconditional 2. Whole quantity or whole obligation (not in installment) 3. Reasonable opportunity of inspection. 4. Performance in favour of other party or his representative. (not to third person) 5. Proper time and place 6. As per the terms. Joint promisor- • Joint promisor have to perform jointly and several. • If one of the joint promisor dies then his legal representative will perform. • If all of the joy promisor dies then legal representative of all will perform. • Promisee can take full amount to one promisor or all promisor. Time is the essence- Party can reject the contract and claim compensation. For example wedding date, birthday function, dealing with Jewellery etc. Reciprocal promise (Both parties have to perform)- • Mutual and concurrent (simultaneously) • Conditional and dependent. For example buy ticket to travel. • Mutual and independent.
Views: 27707 LAW Notes
Royalty Accounts, Accountancy  (B.com, M.com, CA, CS, CMA )Gurukpo
 
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Mr. Shivraj Singh, Assistant Professor, Biyani Girls College explained about term used in Royalty Agreement, Recruitment of Royalty Accounting treatment.. http://www.gurukpo.com, http://www.biyanicolleges.org
Views: 95804 Guru Kpo
Myron C. Fagan - Les Illuminati et le CFR (1967)
 
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- S'abonner à la chaîne: https://bit.ly/2KxjCrQ Il s'agit d'un enregistrement de 1967 de Myron Coureval Fagan, pour lequel j'ai mis des sous-titres en français. J'ai moi-même corrigé la traduction jusqu'à 23 minutes, ensuite c'est une traduction automatique. Aussi, ce qui serait bien c'est que vous m'aidiez à finir la traduction des sous-titres ; ) ici: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?v=JSCaITn9Gzc&ref=share Myron Coureval Fagan (31 octobre 1887 - 12 mai 1972) est un dramaturge, réalisateur et producteur de cinéma américain. Il fut également essayiste de théories du complot, anticommuniste fervent et l'un des premiers à parler du complot Illuminati. Myron Coureval Fagan fut le mari de Minna Gombell. Il fut inspiré par John Thomas Flynn pour ses essais conspirationnistes. Voici une liste de ses oeuvres: Films : 1926 Mismates (scénariste) 1929 The Great Power (scénariste et réalisateur) 1931 Smart Woman (scénariste, adapté de sa pièce Nancy's Private Affair) 1931 A Holy Terror (scénariste) Livres et articles : 1932 Nancy's Private Affair, A comedy in three acts 1932 Peter Flies High, A comedy in three acts 1934 The Little Spitfire, A comedy-drama in three acts 1948 Red stars in Hollywood: Their helpers, fellow travelers, and co-conspirators 1948 Moscow over Hollywood (published by R.C. Cary, Los Angeles) 1949 Moscow marches on in Hollywood (News-bulletin/Cinema Educational Guild) 1950 Reds in the Anti-Defamation League (Cinema Educational Guild. News-bulletin, May 1950) 1950 Reds in "crusade for freedom!" (News bulletin) 1950 Hollywood reds are on the run! 1950 Documentation of the Red stars in Hollywood. 1950 Reds in the Anti-Defamation League. 1951 What is this thing called anti-semitism? (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1951 Saga of Operation Survival (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1953 Hollywood backs U.N. conspiracy 1954 Red Treason on Broadway (Cinema Educational Guild) 1956 United Nations "on trial" in Washington, D.C (News-bulletin) 1962 Must we have a Cuban "Pearl Harbor?" (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1964 How Hollywood is brainwashing the people (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) 1964 Civil rights, most sinister tool of the great conspiracy (News-Bulletin) 1965 How greatest white nations were mongrelized, then negroized: That is the fate planned for the American people (News-bulletin) 1966 The UN already secret government of U.S.!: Our recall project can smash it! (News-bulletin) 1966 The complete truth about the "United Nations" conspiracy! (News-bulletin) 1967 You must decide fate of our nation!!!: The Negro (CFR) plot is our greatest menace! (News-bulletin) 1969 Proofs of the great conspiracy and how to smash it!!! (News-bulletin / Cinema Educational Guild) * * * * * * * * - Mes documentaires, ebooks: https://sellfy.com/documents_rares_inedits - Chaîne DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/documents_rares_inedits - Chaîne Minds: https://www.minds.com/Documents_Rares_Inedits - Chaîne Pewtube: https://pewtube.com/user/Docus_Rares_Inedits - Soutenir mon travail: https://patreon.com/documents_rares_inedits - Faire un don (Paypal): https://bit.ly/2x1gX74 - Aidez-moi à traduire les vidéos de la chaîne ! : https://bit.ly/2K3KHkS ----------------------------------------------------------------------- URL de la vidéo:
The Electricity Act, 2003 | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Electricity_Act,_2003 00:00:28 1 Background 00:03:03 2 Generation 00:04:43 3 Distribution 00:05:16 4 Key features 00:08:35 5 Role of CEA 00:10:21 6 Left Parties Opposition 00:11:09 7 Amendments 00:15:47 8 Exceptions 00:16:16 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8238769300904747 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Electricity Act, 2003 is an Act of the Parliament of India enacted to transform the power sector in India. The act covers major issues involving generation, distribution, transmission and trading in power. While some of the sections have already been enacted and are yielding benefits, there are a few other sections that are yet to be fully enforced till date.
Views: 341 wikipedia tts
Ganga Saran vs. Firm Ram Charan Ram Gopal
 
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Reference – A.I.R. 1952, Supreme Court 39. Subject – In this case the circumstances under which Sections 32 and 56 of the Indian Contract Act are applicable, have been explained.
ch 11) Robber Barons And Rebels
 
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chapter 11: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 11, "Robber Barons and Rebels" covers the rise of industrial corporations such as the railroads and banks and their transformation into the nation's dominant institutions, with corruption resulting in both industry and government. Also covered are the popular movements and individuals that opposed corruption, such as the Knights of Labor, Edward Bellamy, the Socialist Labor Party, the Haymarket martyrs, the Homestead strikers, Alexander Berkman, Emma Goldman, Eugene V. Debs, the American Railway Union, the Farmers' Alliance, and the Populist Party.
Views: 18974 andi burridge
Environmentalism: From the Control of Nature to Partnership with Carolyn Merchant
 
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In the Scientific Revolution of the 17th century, the long term goal of the betterment of humankind through the control of nature was a significant advancement. For the 21st century, however, the ethic of control is giving way to one of partnership with the natural world. UC Berkeley Professor Carolyn Merchant discusses how the partnership ethic entails a viable, sustainable relationship in which connections to the global world are recognized through science, technology, and ecological exchanges. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Council Lectures" [7/2010] [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 19243]
Critical Analysis Part 2
 
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For our Critical Analysis for LAW4250, Feaben Tefera, Isabelle Bloomfield and Alicia Crossley have analysed fertility tracker apps and ethical, global and legal concerns they raise regarding gender politics, privacy and consent. Full title: THE BIG DATA GOLDMINE OF WOMEN’S HEALTH: HOW PERIOD APPS HAVE BROKEN OUT THEIR PICKAXES This is Part 2, with a length of 3:01 minutes. This follows on from Part 1 of the presentation with a length of 4:58 minutes, adding up to a total of 7:59 minutes. (excluding 4 seconds of promotional Powtoon footage at the end of each clip) To find out more and look at our references: (see part 1 for more!) Lupton, Deborah and Sarah Pedersen. “What is happening with your body and your baby: Australian women’s use of pregnancy and parenting apps”. (Canberra: News & Media Research Centre, University of Canberra). Mayer, Jonathan and Mitchell, John, (2012). Third-Party Web Tracking: Policy and Technology. University Stanford, CA. McCarthy, Jack, (2015). How Many Health Apps Actually Matter? Retrieved from http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/how-many-health-apps-actually-matter. Meyer, David (2014). Social media terms and conditions are way too complex, say UK MPs. Retrieved at https://www.benton.org/headlines/social-media-terms-and-conditions-are-way-too-complex-say-uk-mps Nathan J. Davis, Presumed Assent: The Judicial Acceptance of Clickwrap, 22 Berkeley Tech. L.J. 577 (2007). Retrieved at http://scholarship.law.berkeley.edu/btlj/vol22/iss1/29 National Public Radio (2012) To Read All Those Web Privacy Policies, Just Take a Month Off Work. Retrieved at https://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2012/04/19/150905465/to-read-all-those-web-privacy-policies-just-take-a-month-off-work Office of the Australian Information Commissioner. Online Behavioural Advertising – know your options. Retrieved at https://www.oaic.gov.au/individuals/privacy-fact-sheets/general/privacy-fact-sheet-4-online-behavioural-advertising-know-your-options Peterson, Andrea (2016). Watch Out, Ladies: Your period-tracking app could be leaking personal data. Washington Post. Retrieved at https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/08/03/how-your-period-tracking-app-could-leak-your-most-intimate-information/?utm_term=.b1a94fc20311 Quintin, Cooper (2017). The Pregnancy Panopticon. Retrieved at https://www.eff.org/files/2017/07/27/the_pregnancy_panopticon.pdf Raysman, Richard (2012). Enforceability of Clickwrap Agreement Called into Question - Checklist for Best Practices in Electronic Contracting. Retrieved at https://www.hklaw.com/digitaltechblog/Enforceability-of-Clickwrap-Agreement-Called-into-Question----Checklist-for-Best-Practices-in-Electronic-Contracting-11-07-2012/ Rundle, Michael (2012). Instagram Reverses Terms and Conditions After Users’ Outrage. Retrieved at http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/12/21/instagram-reverses-terms-decision_n_2343372.html Science and Technology Committee – Fourth Report: Responsible Use of Data. (2014). Retrieved at https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmsctech/245/24502.htm Shearman, Sarah, (2016). Are Period Tracking Apps an Invasion to Women’s Privacy?  Retrieved from https://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/are-period-tracking-apps-an-invasion-to-womens-privacy-a3273916.html. Shemkus, Sarah, (2015). Fitness Trackers Are Popular Among Insurers and Employers – But is Your Data Safe? Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/apr/17/fitness-trackers-wearables-insurance-employees-jobs-health-data?CMP=aff_1432&awc=5795_1515331602_b7f6a6fe34a3038d7daec336fb8be4f4. Shermach, Kelly, (2006). Data Mining: Where Legality and Ethics Rarely Meet. Retrieved from https://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/52616.html?wlc=1245363355. Technology Review (2014). The Murky World of Third Party Web Tracking. Retrieved at https://www.technologyreview.com/s/530741/the-murky-world-of-third-party-web-tracking/ Turow, Joseph, Michael Hennessy and Nora Draper, (2015). The Tradeoff Fallacy: How Marketers Are Misrepresenting American Consumers and Opening Them Up to Exploitation. Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved at https://www.asc.upenn.edu/sites/default/files/TradeoffFallacy_1.pdf Weigel, Moira, (2016). ‘Fitbit For Your Period’: The Rise of Fertility Tracking. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/mar/23/fitbit-for-your-period-the-rise-of-fertility-tracking?CMP=aff_1432&awc=5795_1515327221_23d14ce40acbe13708065a80cb4009f0. Toll (FGCT) Pty Ltd v Alphapharm Pty Ltd (2004) 219 CLR 165. Retrieved at https://www.ato.gov.au/law/view/document?DocID=JUD%2F*2004*HCA52%2F00001 L’Estrange v F Graucob Ltd [1934] 2 KB 394. Read a summary at https://wikijuris.net/cases/lestrange_v_f_graucob_1934 ProCD, Inc. v Zeidenberg (1996) 86 F.ed 1447. Retrieved at https://advance.lexis.com/api/permalink/c3c0bcb1-2787-4b1a-aae0-2e0239a283f8/?context=1201008
Sessions vehemently denies misleading on Russia contacts, claiming memory lapse
 
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Attorney General Jeff Sessions insisted before the Senate Judiciary hearing that he has never deliberately misled Congress. Since his January confirmation hearing, he has been dogged by contradictions to his statement that he had no communications with Russians during the 2016 campaign. Lisa Desjardins offers highlights from his testimony, and Judy Woodruff talks with Carrie Johnson of NPR.
Views: 4239 PBS NewsHour
ch 10) The Other Civil War
 
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chapter 10: A People's History (Of The United States) Howard Zinn. ~ Chapter 10, "The Other Civil War", covers the Anti-Rent movement, the Dorr Rebellion, the Flour Riot of 1837, the Molly Maguires, the rise of labor unions, the Lowell girls movement, and other class struggles centered around the various depressions of the 19th century. He describes the abuse of government power by corporations and the efforts by workers to resist those abuses.
Views: 10700 andi burridge
Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules VERNE - Full Free Audio Book
 
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0:00:00 Chapter 1Around the World 0:11:19 Chapter 2 0:20:05 Chapter 3 0:35:24 Chapter 4 0:43:14 Chapter 5 0:50:28 Chapter 6 1:00:00 Chapter 7 1:06:13 Chapter 8 1:14:40 Chapter 9 1:26:21 Chapter 10 1:38:11 Chapter 11 1:57:09 Chapter 12 2:12:30 Chapter 13 2:26:36 Chapter 14 2:40:31 Chapter 15 2:54:03 Chapter 16 3:05:36 Chapter 17 3:18:16 Chapter 18 3:27:45 Chapter 19 3:42:52 Chapter 20 3:55:35 Chapter 21 4:13:01 Chapter 22 4:27:53 Chapter 23 4:41:47 Chapter 24 4:55:45 Chapter 25 5:10:21 Chapter 26 5:21:58 Chapter 27 5:35:47 Chapter 28 5:52:59 Chapter 29 6:07:57 Chapter 30 6:23:02 Chapter 31 6:35:39 Chapter 32 6:43:46 Chapter 33 7:01:21 Chapter 34 7:08:42 Chapter 35 7:20:40 Chapter 36 7:28:54 Chapter 37 Online text: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/103 Read by:Mark F. Smith Book Coordinator:Mark F. Smith Meta Coordinator:Catharine Eastman Proof Listener:Ans Wink Around the World in Eighty Days Jules VERNE (1828 - 1905), translated by UNKNOWN ( - ) Mysterious Phileas Fogg is a cool customer. A man of the most repetitious and punctual habit - with no apparent sense of adventure whatsoever - he gambles his considerable fortune that he can complete a journey around the world in just 80 days... immediately after a newspaper calculates the feat as just barely possible. With his excitable French manservant in tow, Fogg undertakes the exercise immediately, with no preparations, trusting that his traveling funds will make up for delays along the way. But unbeknownst to him, British police are desperately seeking to arrest him for the theft of a huge sum by someone who resembles him, and they will track him around the world, if necessary, to apprehend him. This is an adventure novel of the first water, with wholly unexpected perils, hair-breadth escapes, brilliant solutions to insoluble problems, and even a love story. And can this be? - That he returns to London just five minutes too late to win his wager and retain his fortune? (Summary by Mark F. Smith) Genre(s): Action & Adventure Fiction Language: English Livres audio / AudioBooks : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpXzZ8x543O5WIC0ZCMDBPMMrRms6N6OB Livres Audio en Français : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpXzZ8x543O6fPCOTyw24_bGkj__mD-62 AudioBooks in English : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLpXzZ8x543O6Jzb-eMJmn4KVYFIVTs__q Plus de 2000+ livres audio gratuitement, les chefs-d'œuvre de la littérature classique et contemporaine, analyses pour le BAC, œuvres complètes. Pensez à remercier les donneurs de voix, qui sont bénévoles, pour l'aide que leur travail peut apporter à tous ceux qui ont du mal à lire, les aveugles, dyslexiques, handicapés, mais aussi les étudiants, ceux qui bossent ou ceux qui ne peuvent pas acheter des audio-livres. Online library of free public domain audiobooks, read by volunteers. Objective is to make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet. Listen to full length audio books online for free on YouTube! #CultureAudioBooksLivresAudio #LittératureLivresAudioAudioBooks #freeaudiobooks #greatestaudiobooks
Timeline of motor and engine technology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_motor_and_engine_technology 00:05:16 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9445590093575759 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Timeline of motor and engine technology (c. 30–70 AD) – Hero of Alexandria describes the first documented steam-powered device, the aeolipile. 13th century - Chinese chronicles wrote about a solid rocket motor used in warfare 1698 – Thomas Savery builds a steam-powered water pump for pumping water out of mines. 1712 – Thomas Newcomen builds a piston-and-cylinder steam-powered water pump for pumping water out of mines. 1769 – James Watt patents his first improved steam engine. 1806 – François Isaac de Rivaz invented a hydrogen powered engine, the first successful internal combustion engine. 1807 - Nicéphore Niépce and his brother Claude build a fluid piston internal combustion engine, the Pyréolophore and use it to power a boat up the river Saône. 1816 – Robert Stirling invented his hot air Stirling engine, and what we now call a "regenerator". 1821 – Michael Faraday builds an electricity-powered motor. 1824 – Nicolas Léonard Sadi Carnot first publishes that the efficiency of a heat engine depends on the temperature difference between an engine and its environment. 1837 – First American patent for an electric motor (U.S. Patent 132). 1850 – The first explicit statement of the first and second law of thermodynamics, given by Rudolf Clausius. 1860 - Lenoir 2 cycle engine 1872 - Brayton Engine 1877 – Nikolaus Otto patents a four-stroke internal combustion engine (U.S. Patent 194,047). 1882 – James Atkinson invents the Atkinson cycle engine, now common in some hybrid vehicles. 1885 – Gottlieb Daimler patents the first supercharger. 1886 – Hot bulb engine was established by Herbert Akroyd Stuart, Gottlieb Daimler invents the Petrol engine. 1888 – An AC induction motor is featured in a paper published by Galileo Ferraris and is patented in the U.S. by Nikola Tesla. 1892 – Rudolf Diesel patents the Diesel engine (U.S. Patent 608,845). 1899 – Ferdinand Porsche creates the Lohner-Porsche, the first hybrid vehicle. 1903 – The Exploration of Cosmic Space by Means of Reaction Devices was published by Konstantin Tsiolkovsky 1905 – Alfred Büchi patents the turbocharger. 1913 – René Lorin invents the ramjet. 1915 – Leonard Dyer invents a six-stroke engine, now known as the Crower six-stroke engine named after his reinventor Bruce Crower. 1926 - Robert H. Goddard launched the first liquid-fueled rocket. 1929 – Felix Wankel patents the Wankel rotary engine (U.S. Patent 2,988,008). Late 1930s – Hans von Ohain and Frank Whittle separately build pioneering gas turbine engines intended for aircraft propulsion, leading to the pioneering turbojet powered flights in 1939 Germany and 1941 England. 1939 – The BMW company's BMW 801 aviation radial engine pioneers the use of an early form of an engine control unit, the Kommandogerät. 1940s – Ralph Miller patents his Miller cycle engine. 1954 – Felix Wankel creates the first working Wankel engine. 1957 - Rambler Rebel announced Electrojector electronic fuel injection option, however no production models were offered with the option. 1966 – RD-0410 nuclear thermal rocket engine was ground-tested. 1960s – alternators replace generators on automobile engines. 1970s – electronically controlled ignition appears in automobile engines. 1975 – Catalytic converters are first widely introduced on production automobiles in the US to comply with tightening EPA regulations on auto exhaust. 1980s – electronically controlled ignition improved to reduce pollution. 1980s – electronic fuel injection appears on gasoline automobile engines. 1989 – The Bajulaz Six-Stroke Engine was invented by the Bajulaz S A company, based in Geneva, Switzerland; it ...
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Gold Coast (British colony) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Gold Coast (British colony) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Gold Coast was a British colony on the Gulf of Guinea in west Africa from 1867 to its independence as the nation of Ghana in 1957. The first Europeans to arrive at the coast were the Portuguese in 1471. They encountered a variety of African kingdoms, some of which controlled substantial deposits of gold in the soil. The kingdoms had a tradition of enslaving captives taken in warfare. Some were sold to Arab traders from North Africa and transported to Islamic Mediterranean civilizations. In 1482, the Portuguese came to the continent for increased trade. They built the Castle of Elmina, the first European settlement on the Gold Coast. From here they acquired slaves and gold in trade for European goods, such as metal knives, beads, mirrors, rum, and guns. News of the successful trading spread quickly, and British, Dutch, Danish, Prussian and Swedish traders arrived as well. The European traders built several forts along the coastline. The Gold Coast had long been a name for the region used by Europeans because of the large gold resources found in the area. The slave trade was the principal exchange and major part of the economy for many years. In this period, European nations began to explore and colonize the Americas. Soon the Portuguese and Spanish began to export African slaves to the Caribbean, and North and South America. The Dutch and British also entered the slave trade, at first supplying markets in the Caribbean and on the Caribbean coast of South America. The Royal Trading Company was established by the Crown in 1752 to lead its trading in Africa. It was replaced by the African Company of Merchants, which led the British trading efforts into the early 19th century. In 1821 the British government withdrew their charter and seized privately held lands along the coast. In 1867 the government formed the British Gold Coast colony, after having taken over the remaining interests of other European countries. They purchased and incorporated the Danish Gold Coast in 1850 and the Dutch Gold Coast, including Fort Elmina, in 1872. Britain steadily expanded its colony through the invasion and subjection of local kingdoms as well, particularly the Ashanti and Fante confederacies. The Ashanti people had controlled much of the territory of Ghana before the Europeans arrived and were often in conflict with them. In the 21st century they continue to constitute the largest ethnic community in Ghana. Four wars, the Anglo-Ashanti Wars, were fought between the Ashanti (Asante) and the British, who were sometimes allied with the Fante. During the First Anglo-Ashanti War (1822–24), the two groups fought because of a disagreement over an Ashanti chief and slavery. The British had abolished the Atlantic slave trade but kept the institution in its colonies until 1834. Tensions increased in 1874 during the Second Ashanti War (1873–74) when the British sacked the Ashanti capital of Kumasi. The Third Ashanti War (1893–94) occurred because the new Ashanti ruler Asantehene wanted to exercise his new title. From 1895–96 the British and Ashanti fought in the Fourth and final Ashanti War, where the Ashanti fought for and lost their independence. In 1900 the Ashanti Uprising took place. The British suppressed the violence and captured of the city of Kumasi. At the end of this last Ashanti War, the territory of the Ashanti people became a British protectorate on 1 January 1902. By 1901, British had established a colony incorporating all of the Gold Coast, with its kingdoms and tribes considered a single unit. The British exploited and exported a variety of natural resources such as gold, metal ores, diamonds, ivory, pepper, timber, grain and cocoa. The British colonists built railways and a complex transport infrastructure to support the shipment of such commodity goods. This has formed the basis for the transport infrastructure in modern-day Ghana. They also built Weste ...
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England | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England 00:02:55 1 Toponymy 00:06:43 2 History 00:06:52 2.1 Prehistory and antiquity 00:11:39 2.2 Middle Ages 00:17:18 2.3 Early modern 00:22:57 2.4 Late modern and contemporary 00:27:36 3 Governance 00:27:45 3.1 Politics 00:30:52 3.2 Law 00:32:40 3.3 Regions, counties, and districts 00:36:16 4 Geography 00:36:25 4.1 Landscape and rivers 00:39:55 4.2 Climate 00:41:25 4.3 Major conurbations 00:42:39 5 Economy 00:48:18 5.1 Science and technology 00:51:24 5.2 Transport 00:54:44 6 Healthcare 00:56:55 7 Demography 00:57:04 7.1 Population 01:00:37 7.2 Language 01:03:41 7.3 Religion 01:08:03 8 Education 01:12:06 9 Culture 01:12:15 9.1 Architecture 01:15:15 9.2 Folklore 01:17:57 9.3 Cuisine 01:20:34 9.4 Visual arts 01:23:00 9.5 Literature, poetry, and philosophy 01:26:15 9.6 Performing arts 01:29:53 9.7 Cinema 01:32:38 9.8 Museums, libraries, and galleries 01:34:28 10 Sports 01:45:33 11 National symbols 01:48:28 12 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8598710302989776 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider world. The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialised nation.England's terrain is chiefly low hills and plains, especially in central and southern England. However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills). The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union. England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. In 1922 the Irish Free State seceded from the United Kingdom, leading to the latter being renamed the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
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Things Mr. Welch is No Longer Allowed to do in a RPG #1-2450 Reading Compilation
 
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A list of things that Mister Welch is no long allowed to do in a tabletop rpg game. From Dungeons and dragons, call of cthulu, Pathfinder, Star Wars, and many other tabletop games and modules! 2450 entries in all! If you wish to see more from Eastside Show SCP (Eastside Steve), be sure to subscribe today for the latest videos! https://goo.gl/KekHSK The complete reading compilation of "Things Mr. Welch is No Longer Allowed to do in a RPG" numbers 1-2540! Enjoy the insanity, featuring RPG loop holes, insanity, and all sorts of table top shenanigans! Read along with me! ♣Read along: http://theglen.livejournal.com/389635.html TVtropes page: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Blog/ThingsMrWelchIsNoLongerAllowedToDoInAnRPG "Pixel Peeker Polka - slower" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 168355 Eastside Show SCP
Joseph Stalin | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Joseph Stalin Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Joseph Stalin (born Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili; 18 December 1878 – 5 March 1953) was a Soviet revolutionary and politician of Georgian ethnicity. He ruled the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953, holding the titles of General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1922 to 1952 and the nation's Premier from 1941 to 1953. Initially presiding over an oligarchic one-party system that governed by plurality, he became the de facto dictator of the Soviet Union by the 1930s. Ideologically committed to the Leninist interpretation of Marxism, Stalin helped to formalise these ideas as Marxism–Leninism, while his own policies became known as Stalinism. Born to a poor family in Gori, Russian Empire (now Georgia), Stalin began his revolutionary career by joining the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party as a youth. He edited the party's newspaper, Pravda, and raised funds for Vladimir Lenin's Bolshevik faction via robberies, kidnappings, and protection rackets. Repeatedly arrested, he underwent several internal exiles. After the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia during the 1917 October Revolution, Stalin joined the party's governing Politburo, where he was instrumental in overseeing the Soviet Union's establishment in 1922. As Lenin fell ill and then died in 1924, Stalin assumed leadership over the country. During Stalin's rule, "Socialism in One Country" became a central tenet of the party's dogma, and Lenin's New Economic Policy was replaced with a centralized command economy. Under the Five-Year Plan system, the country underwent collectivisation and rapid industrialization but experienced significant disruptions in food production that contributed to the famine of 1932–33. To eradicate those regarded as "enemies of the working class", Stalin instituted the "Great Purge", in which over a million were imprisoned and at least 700,000 executed between 1934 and 1939. Stalin's government promoted Marxism–Leninism abroad through the Communist International and supported anti-fascist movements throughout Europe during the 1930s, particularly in the Spanish Civil War. In 1939, it signed a non-aggression pact with Nazi Germany, resulting in their joint invasion of Poland. Germany ended the pact by invading the Soviet Union in 1941. Despite initial setbacks, the Soviet Red Army repelled the German incursion and captured Berlin in 1945, ending World War II in Europe. The Soviets annexed the Baltic states and helped establish Soviet-aligned governments throughout Central and Eastern Europe, China and North Korea. The Soviet Union and the United States emerged from the war as the two world superpowers. Tensions arose between the Soviet-backed Eastern Bloc and U.S.-backed Western Bloc which became known as the Cold War. Stalin led his country through its post-war reconstruction, during which it developed a nuclear weapon in 1949. In these years, the country experienced another major famine and an anti-semitic campaign peaking in the Doctors' plot. Stalin died in 1953 and was eventually succeeded by Nikita Khrushchev, who denounced his predecessor and initiated a de-Stalinisation process throughout Soviet society. Widely considered one of the 20th century's most significant figures, Stalin was the subject of a pervasive personality cult within the international Marxist–Leninist movement, for whom Stalin was a champion of socialism and the working class. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Stalin has retained popularity in Russia and Georgia as a victorious wartime leader who established the Soviet Union as a major world power. Conversely, his totalitarian government has been widely condemned for overseeing mass repressions, ethnic cleansing, hundreds of thousands of executions, and famines which caused the deaths of millions.
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Sarah Winnemucca | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Sarah Winnemucca 00:03:02 1 Early life and education 00:05:05 2 Pyramid Lake War and stage 00:08:12 3 Teaching and interpreter 00:08:45 4 Marriage and family 00:09:15 5 Bannock War 00:11:37 6 Move to Yakama Reservation 00:13:31 7 Second marriage 00:13:57 8 Lectures and writing 00:16:18 9 Legacy 00:17:08 10 Works Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Sarah Winnemucca Hopkins (born Thocmentony, meaning "Shell Flower; also seen as "Tocmetone" in Northern Paiute; c. 1844 – October 16, 1891) was a Northern Paiute author, activist and educator. Reno was born near Humboldt Lake, Nevada, into an influential Paiute family who led their community in pursuing friendly relations with the arriving groups of Anglo-American settlers. She was sent to study in a Catholic school in Santa Clara, California. When the Paiute War erupted between the Pyramid Lake Paiute and the settlers, including some who were friends of the Winnemucca family, Sarah and some of her family traveled to San Francisco and Virginia City to escape the fighting. They made a living performing onstage as "A Paiute Royal Family." In 1865, while the Winnemucca family was away, their band was attacked by the US cavalry, who killed 29 Paiutes, including Sarah's mother and several members of her extended family. Subsequently, Winnemucca became an advocate for the rights of Native Americans, traveling across the US to tell Anglo-Americans about the plight of her people. When the Paiute were interned in a concentration camp at Yakima, Washington after the Bannock War, she traveled to Washington, D.C. to lobby Congress and the executive branch for their release. She also served US forces as a messenger, interpreter, and guide, and as a teacher for imprisoned Native Americans. Winnemucca published Life Among the Paiutes: Their Wrongs and Claims (1883), a book that is both a memoir and history of her people during their first 40 years of contact with European Americans. It is considered the "first known autobiography written by a Native American woman." Anthropologist Omer Stewart described it as "one of the first and one of the most enduring ethnohistorical books written by an American Indian," frequently cited by scholars. Following the publication of the book, Winnemucca toured the Eastern United States, giving lectures about her people in New England, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C. She returned to the West, founding a private school for Native American children in Lovelock, Nevada. Since the late 20th century, scholars have paid renewed attention to Winnemucca for her contributions. In 1993, she was inducted posthumously into the Nevada Writers Hall of Fame. In 2005, the state of Nevada contributed a statue of her by sculptor Benjamin Victor to the National Statuary Hall Collection in the U.S. Capitol. Winnemucca's legacy has been controversial. Some biographers have wished to remember her primarily for her activism and social work to better the conditions for her people, while others have criticized her for her tendency to exaggerate her social status among the Paiute. Among the Paiute, her assistance to the US military at a time when they were at war with the Paiute has been criticized, as has her advocacy for assimilation of Natives to Anglo-American culture. But the Paiute have also recognized her social work and activism for indigenous rights.
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Mining | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:51 1 History 00:02:00 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:18 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:31 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:15 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:23 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:36 1.6 The Americas 00:16:44 1.7 Modern period 00:18:22 2 Mine development and life cycle 00:21:09 3 Mining techniques 00:22:39 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:44 3.2 Underground mining 00:25:16 3.3 Highwall mining 00:27:02 4 Machines 00:28:27 5 Processing 00:31:18 6 Environmental effects 00:35:27 6.1 Waste 00:38:00 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:38:45 7 Mining industry 00:43:04 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:43:54 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:47:59 7.3 World Bank 00:50:07 8 Safety 00:53:52 9 Records 00:56:26 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9838512602070575 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or feasibly created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
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P. G. T. Beauregard | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: P. G. T. Beauregard 00:02:07 1 Early life and education 00:04:14 2 Career in U.S. Army 00:07:32 3 Family 00:08:46 4 Civil War 00:08:55 4.1 Charleston 00:13:38 4.2 First Bull Run (First Manassas) 00:18:21 4.3 Shiloh and Corinth 00:22:13 4.4 Return to Charleston 00:25:55 4.5 Richmond 00:29:26 4.6 Return to the West 00:33:10 5 Postbellum life 00:37:54 6 Beauregard and Black Civil Rights 00:45:28 7 Legacy 00:46:17 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Pierre-Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (May 28, 1818 – February 20, 1893) was an American military officer who was the first prominent general of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. Today, he is commonly referred to as P. G. T. Beauregard, but he rarely used his first name as an adult. He signed correspondence as G. T. Beauregard. Trained as a civil engineer at the United States Military Academy, Beauregard served with distinction as an engineer in the Mexican–American War. Following a brief appointment as superintendent at West Point in 1861, after the South seceded he resigned from the United States Army and became the first brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. He commanded the defenses of Charleston, South Carolina, at the start of the Civil War at Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Three months later he won the First Battle of Bull Run near Manassas, Virginia. Beauregard commanded armies in the Western Theater, including at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee, and the Siege of Corinth in northern Mississippi. He returned to Charleston and defended it in 1863 from repeated naval and land attacks by Union forces. His greatest achievement was saving the important industrial city of Petersburg, Virginia, in June 1864, and thus the nearby Confederate capital of Richmond, from assaults by overwhelmingly superior Union Army forces. His influence over Confederate strategy was lessened by his poor professional relationships with President Jefferson Davis and other senior generals and officials. In April 1865, Beauregard and his commander, General Joseph E. Johnston, convinced Davis and the remaining cabinet members that the war needed to end. Johnston surrendered most of the remaining armies of the Confederacy, including Beauregard and his men, to Major General William Tecumseh Sherman. Following his military career, Beauregard returned to Louisiana, where he advocated for Black civil rights and Black suffrage, served as a railroad executive, and became wealthy as a promoter of the Louisiana Lottery.
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Eritrea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Eritrea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Eritrea (; ( listen)), , officially the State of Eritrea is a country in the Horn of Africa, with its capital at Asmara. It is bordered by Sudan in the west, Ethiopia in the south, and Djibouti in the southeast. The northeastern and eastern parts of Eritrea have an extensive coastline along the Red Sea. The nation has a total area of approximately 117,600 km2 (45,406 sq mi), and includes the Dahlak Archipelago and several of the Hanish Islands. Its toponym Eritrea is based on the Greek name for the Red Sea (Ἐρυθρὰ Θάλασσα Erythra Thalassa), which was first adopted for Italian Eritrea in 1890. Eritrea is a multi-ethnic country, with nine recognized ethnic groups in its population of around 5 million. Most residents speak languages from the Afroasiatic family, either of the Ethiopian Semitic languages or Cushitic branches. Among these communities, the Tigrinyas make up about 55% of the population, with the Tigre people constituting around 30% of inhabitants. In addition, there are a number of Nilo-Saharan-speaking Nilotic ethnic minorities. Most people in the territory adhere to Christianity or Islam.The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and northern Ethiopia, was established during the first or second centuries AD. It adopted Christianity around the middle of the fourth century. In medieval times much of Eritrea fell under the Medri Bahri kingdom, with a smaller region being part of Hamasien. The creation of modern-day Eritrea is a result of the incorporation of independent, distinct kingdoms and sultanates (for example, Medri Bahri and the Sultanate of Aussa) eventually resulting in the formation of Italian Eritrea. After the defeat of the Italian colonial army in 1942, Eritrea was administered by the British Military Administration until 1952. Following the UN General Assembly decision, in 1952, Eritrea would govern itself with a local Eritrean parliament but for foreign affairs and defense it would enter into a federal status with Ethiopia for a period of 10 years. However, in 1962 the government of Ethiopia annulled the Eritrean parliament and formally annexed Eritrea. But the Eritreans that argued for complete Eritrean independence since the ouster of the Italians in 1941, anticipated what was coming and in 1960 organized the Eritrean Liberation Front in opposition. In 1991, after 30 years of continuous armed struggle for independence, the Eritrean liberation fighters entered the capital city, Asmara, in victory. Eritrea is a one-party state in which national legislative elections have never been held since independence. According to Human Rights Watch, the Eritrean government's human rights record is among the worst in the world. The Eritrean government has dismissed these allegations as politically motivated. The compulsory military service requires long, indefinite conscription periods, which some Eritreans leave the country to avoid. Because all local media is state-owned, Eritrea was also ranked as having the second-least press freedom in the global Press Freedom Index, behind only North Korea. The sovereign state of Eritrea is a member of the African Union, the United Nations, and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, and is an observer in the Arab League alongside Brazil, Venezuela, India and Turkey.
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Coercion: The Power to Hurt in International Politics
 
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Peter Krause, Associate Professor, Political Science Timothy Crawford, Associate Professor, Political Science From the rising significance of non-state actors to the increasing influence of regional powers, the nature and conduct of international politics has arguably changed dramatically since the height of the Cold War. Yet much of the literature on deterrence and compellence continues to draw (whether implicitly or explicitly) upon assumptions and precepts formulated in-and predicated upon-politics in a state-centric, bipolar world. Coercion moves beyond these somewhat hidebound premises and examines the critical issue of coercion in the 21st century, with a particular focus on new actors, strategies and objectives in this very old bargaining game. The chapters in this volume examine intra-state, inter-state, and transnational coercion and deterrence as well as both military and non-military instruments of persuasion, thus expanding our understanding of coercion for conflict in the 21st century. Scholars have analyzed the causes, dynamics, and effects of coercion for decades, but previous works have principally focused on a single state employing conventional military means to pressure another state to alter its behavior. In contrast, this volume captures fresh developments, both theoretical and policy relevant. This chapters in this volume focus on tools (terrorism, sanctions, drones, cyber warfare, intelligence, and forced migration), actors (insurgents, social movements, and NGOs) and mechanisms (trilateral coercion, diplomatic and economic isolation, foreign-imposed regime change, coercion of nuclear proliferators, and two-level games) that have become more prominent in recent years, but which have yet to be extensively or systematically addressed in either academic or policy literatures.
Søren Kierkegaard | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Søren Kierkegaard Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Søren Aabye Kierkegaard ( SORR-ən KEER-kə-gard; Danish: [sɶːɐn ˈkiɐ̯ɡəɡɒːˀ] (listen); 5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology, and the philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. Much of his philosophical work deals with the issues of how one lives as a "single individual", giving priority to concrete human reality over abstract thinking and highlighting the importance of personal choice and commitment. He was against literary critics who defined idealist intellectuals and philosophers of his time, and thought that Swedenborg, Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Schlegel and Hans Christian Andersen were all "understood" far too quickly by "scholars".Kierkegaard's theological work focuses on Christian ethics, the institution of the Church, the differences between purely objective proofs of Christianity, the infinite qualitative distinction between man and God, and the individual's subjective relationship to the God-Man Jesus the Christ, which came through faith. Much of his work deals with Christian love. He was extremely critical of the practice of Christianity as a state religion, primarily that of the Church of Denmark. His psychological work explored the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices.Kierkegaard's early work was written under the various pseudonyms that he used to present distinctive viewpoints and to interact with each other in complex dialogue. He explored particularly complex problems from different viewpoints, each under a different pseudonym. He wrote many Upbuilding Discourses under his own name and dedicated them to the "single individual" who might want to discover the meaning of his works. Notably, he wrote: "Science and scholarship want to teach that becoming objective is the way. Christianity teaches that the way is to become subjective, to become a subject." While scientists can learn about the world by observation, Kierkegaard emphatically denied that observation could reveal the inner workings of the world of the spirit.Some of Kierkegaard's key ideas include the concept of "subjective and objective truths", the knight of faith, the recollection and repetition dichotomy, angst, the infinite qualitative distinction, faith as a passion, and the three stages on life's way. Kierkegaard wrote in Danish and the reception of his work was initially limited to Scandinavia, but by the turn of the 20th century his writings were translated into French, German, and other major European languages. By the mid-20th century, his thought exerted a substantial influence on philosophy, theology, and Western culture.
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University of Cambridge | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: University of Cambridge Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The University of Cambridge (formally The Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of the University of Cambridge) is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a Royal Charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university. The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford after a dispute with the townspeople. The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Cambridge has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.Cambridge is formed from a variety of institutions which include 31 constituent Colleges and over 100 academic departments organised into six schools. Cambridge University Press, a department of the university, is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world. The university also operates eight cultural and scientific museums, including the Fitzwilliam Museum, as well as a botanic garden. Cambridge's libraries hold a total of around 15 million books, eight million of which are in Cambridge University Library, a legal deposit library. In the fiscal year ending 31 July 2017, the university had a total income of £1.71 billion, of which £458 million was from research grants and contracts. This is the largest annual income of any university in the UK. The central university and colleges have combined net assets of around £11.8 billion, also the largest of any university in the UK. The university is closely linked with the development of the high-tech business cluster known as "Silicon Fen". It is a member of numerous associations and forms part of the "golden triangle" of leading English universities and Cambridge University Health Partners, an academic health science centre. As of September 2017, Cambridge is ranked the world's second best university by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings, and is ranked 3rd worldwide by Academic Ranking of World Universities, 6th by QS, and 7th by US News. According to the Times Higher Education ranking, no other institution in the world ranks in the top 10 for as many subjects. The university has educated many notable alumni, including eminent mathematicians, scientists, politicians, lawyers, philosophers, writers, actors and foreign Heads of State. As of October 2018, 118 Nobel Laureates, 11 Fields Medalists, 6 Turing Award winners and 15 British Prime Ministers have been affiliated with Cambridge as students, alumni, faculty or research staff.
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Gold Coast (British colony) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Gold Coast (British colony) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Gold Coast was a British colony on the Gulf of Guinea in west Africa from 1867 to its independence as the nation of Ghana in 1957. The first Europeans to arrive at the coast were the Portuguese in 1471. They encountered a variety of African kingdoms, some of which controlled substantial deposits of gold in the soil. The kingdoms had a tradition of enslaving captives taken in warfare. Some were sold to Arab traders from North Africa and transported to Islamic Mediterranean civilizations. In 1482, the Portuguese came to the continent for increased trade. They built the Castle of Elmina, the first European settlement on the Gold Coast. From here they acquired slaves and gold in trade for European goods, such as metal knives, beads, mirrors, rum, and guns. News of the successful trading spread quickly, and British, Dutch, Danish, Prussian and Swedish traders arrived as well. The European traders built several forts along the coastline. The Gold Coast had long been a name for the region used by Europeans because of the large gold resources found in the area. The slave trade was the principal exchange and major part of the economy for many years. In this period, European nations began to explore and colonize the Americas. Soon the Portuguese and Spanish began to export African slaves to the Caribbean, and North and South America. The Dutch and British also entered the slave trade, at first supplying markets in the Caribbean and on the Caribbean coast of South America. The Royal Trading Company was established by the Crown in 1752 to lead its trading in Africa. It was replaced by the African Company of Merchants, which led the British trading efforts into the early 19th century. In 1821 the British government withdrew their charter and seized privately held lands along the coast. In 1867 the government formed the British Gold Coast colony, after having taken over the remaining interests of other European countries. They purchased and incorporated the Danish Gold Coast in 1850 and the Dutch Gold Coast, including Fort Elmina, in 1872. Britain steadily expanded its colony through the invasion and subjection of local kingdoms as well, particularly the Ashanti and Fante confederacies. The Ashanti people had controlled much of the territory of Ghana before the Europeans arrived and were often in conflict with them. In the 21st century they continue to constitute the largest ethnic community in Ghana. Four wars, the Anglo-Ashanti Wars, were fought between the Ashanti (Asante) and the British, who were sometimes allied with the Fante. During the First Anglo-Ashanti War (1822–24), the two groups fought because of a disagreement over an Ashanti chief and slavery. The British had abolished the Atlantic slave trade but kept the institution in its colonies until 1834. Tensions increased in 1874 during the Second Ashanti War (1873–74) when the British sacked the Ashanti capital of Kumasi. The Third Ashanti War (1893–94) occurred because the new Ashanti ruler Asantehene wanted to exercise his new title. From 1895–96 the British and Ashanti fought in the Fourth and final Ashanti War, where the Ashanti fought for and lost their independence. In 1900 the Ashanti Uprising took place. The British suppressed the violence and captured of the city of Kumasi. At the end of this last Ashanti War, the territory of the Ashanti people became a British protectorate on 1 January 1902. By 1901, British had established a colony incorporating all of the Gold Coast, with its kingdoms and tribes considered a single unit. The British exploited and exported a variety of natural resources such as gold, metal ores, diamonds, ivory, pepper, timber, grain and cocoa. The British colonists built railways and a complex transport infrastructure to support the shipment of such commodity goods. This has formed the basis for the transport infrastructure in modern-day Ghana. They also built Weste ...
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Homestead Acts | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Homestead Acts 00:02:13 1 Background 00:03:33 2 History 00:03:42 2.1 Donation Land Claim Act of 1850 00:04:18 2.2 Homestead Act of 1862 00:06:14 2.3 Southern Homestead Act of 1866 00:06:40 2.4 Timber Culture Act of 1873 00:07:12 2.5 Kinkaid Amendment of 1904 00:07:39 2.6 Enlarged Homestead Act of 1909 00:08:24 2.7 Stock-Raising Homestead Act of 1916 00:08:47 2.8 Subsistence Homesteads provisions under the New Deal – 1930 00:09:56 3 Homesteading requirements 00:11:24 4 In practice 00:11:58 5 End of homesteading 00:12:46 6 Criticism 00:15:29 7 Related acts in other countries 00:15:39 7.1 Canada 00:17:35 7.2 New Zealand 00:18:32 7.3 Elsewhere in the British Empire 00:19:01 8 In popular culture 00:21:18 9 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Homestead Acts were several laws in the United States by which an applicant could acquire ownership of government land or the public domain, typically called a "homestead.” In all, more than 270 million acres (1.1 million km2) of public land, or nearly 10% of the total area of the U.S., was given away free to 1.6 million homesteaders; most of the homesteads were west of the Mississippi River. An extension of the Homestead Principle in law, the Homestead Acts were an expression of the "Free Soil" policy of Northerners who wanted individual farmers to own and operate their own farms, as opposed to Southern slave-owners who wanted to buy up large tracts of land and use slave labor, thereby shutting out free white farmers. The first of the acts, the Homestead Act of 1862, opened up millions of acres. Any adult who had never taken up arms against the U.S. government could apply. Women and immigrants who had applied for citizenship were eligible. The 1866 Act explicitly included black Americans and encouraged them to participate, but rampant discrimination slowed black gains. Historian Michael Lanza argues that while the 1866 law pack was not as beneficial as it might have been, it was part of the reason that by 1900 one fourth of all Southern black farmers owned their own farms.Several additional laws were enacted in the latter half of the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Southern Homestead Act of 1866 sought to address land ownership inequalities in the south during Reconstruction. The Timber Culture Act of 1873 granted land to a claimant who was required to plant trees—the tract could be added to an existing homestead claim and had no residency requirement. The Kinkaid Amendment of 1904 granted a full section (640 acres) to new homesteaders settling in western Nebraska. An amendment to the Homestead Act of 1862, the Enlarged Homestead Act, was passed in 1909 and doubled the allotted acreage from 160 to 320 acres. Another amended act, the national Stock-Raising Homestead Act, was passed in 1916 and again increased the land involved, this time to 640 acres.
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American Indian Wars | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: American Indian Wars Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The American Indian Wars (or Indian Wars) is the collective name for the various armed conflicts fought by European governments and colonists, and later the United States government and American settlers, against various American Indian tribes. These conflicts occurred within the United States and Canada from the time of the earliest colonial settlements in the 17th century until the 1920s. The various Indian Wars resulted from a wide variety of sources, including cultural clashes, land disputes, and criminal acts committed on both sides. European powers and the colonies also enlisted Indian tribes to help them conduct warfare against one another's colonial settlements. After the American Revolution, many conflicts were local to specific states or regions and frequently involved disputes over land use; some entailed cycles of violent reprisal. The British Royal Proclamation of 1763 included in the Constitution of Canada prohibited white settlers from taking the lands of indigenous peoples in Canada without signing a treaty with them. It continues to be the law in Canada today, and 11 Numbered Treaties covering most of the First Nations lands limited the number of such conflicts. As white settlers spread westward after 1780, the size, duration, and intensity of armed conflicts increased between settlers and Indians. The climax came in the War of 1812, which resulted in the defeat of major Indian coalitions in the Midwest and the South, and conflict with settlers became much less common. Conflicts were resolved by treaty, often through sale or exchange of territory between the federal government and specific tribes. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 authorized the US government to enforce the Indian removal east of the Mississippi River to the other side of the sparsely populated American frontier. The policy of removal was eventually refined to relocate Indian tribes to specially designated and federally protected reservations.
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Libertarian communism | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Libertarian communism 00:02:26 1 History 00:02:35 1.1 Early precursors 00:05:51 1.2 Joseph Déjacque and the Revolutions of 1848 00:08:16 1.3 The International Workingmen's Association 00:11:30 1.4 Peter Kropotkin 00:15:26 1.5 Organizationalism vs. insurrectionarism and expansion 00:21:19 1.6 Methods of Organising: Platformism vs Synthesism 00:27:51 1.7 The Spanish Revolution 00:30:18 1.8 Post-war years 00:36:19 1.9 Contemporary times 00:38:29 2 Economic theory 00:40:55 3 Philosophical debates 00:41:04 3.1 Motivation 00:42:50 3.2 Freedom, work and leisure 00:44:41 3.3 Individualism and collectivism 00:49:03 3.4 Property 00:51:19 3.5 The commune as an economic democracy 00:55:12 3.6 The revolution and the transition 00:57:40 3.7 Free association of communes as opposed to the nation-state 00:59:51 4 Example societies through history 01:00:02 4.1 Early examples 01:01:52 4.2 Gift economies and commons-based organising 01:06:42 4.3 Korean Anarchist Movement 01:07:04 4.4 Urban communities 01:07:58 4.5 Give-away shops Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Anarcho-communism (also known as anarchist communism, free communism, stateless communism, libertarian communism and communist anarchism) is a political philosophy and theory of anarchism which advocates the abolition of the state, capitalism, wage labour and private property (while retaining respect for personal property, along with collectively-owned items, goods and services) in favor of common ownership of the means of production, direct democracy (among communes, participatory democracy), cooperativism, equal distribution of valuables, and a horizontal network of workers' councils with production and consumption based on the guiding principle: "From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs".Some forms of anarchist communism, such as insurrectionary anarchism, are strongly influenced by egoism and radical individualism, believing anarcho-communism is the best social system for the realization of individual freedom. Most anarcho-communists view anarcho-communism as a way of reconciling the opposition between the individual and society.Anarcho-communism developed out of radical socialist currents after the French Revolution, but was first formulated as such in the Italian section of the First International. The theoretical work of Peter Kropotkin took importance later as it expanded and developed pro-organizationalist and insurrectionary anti-organizationalist sections. To date, the best-known examples of an anarchist communist society (i.e. established around the ideas as they exist today and achieving worldwide attention and knowledge in the historical canon) are the anarchist territories during the Spanish Revolution and the Free Territory during the Russian Revolution. Through the efforts and influence of the Spanish anarchists during the Spanish Revolution within the Spanish Civil War, starting in 1936 anarchist communism existed in most of Aragon, parts of the Levante and Andalusia as well as in the stronghold of anarchist Catalonia before being crushed by the combined forces of the regime that won the war, Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, Spanish Communist Party repression (backed by the Soviet Union) as well as economic and armaments blockades from the capitalist countries and the Spanish Republic itself. During the Russian Revolution, anarchists such as Nestor Makhno worked to create and defend—through the Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine—anarchist communism in the Free Territory of the Ukraine from 1919 before being conquered by the Bolsheviks in 1921.
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Wales | Wikipedia audio article
 
02:09:48
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wales 00:03:39 1 Etymology 00:07:38 2 History 00:07:47 2.1 Prehistoric origins 00:10:47 2.2 Roman era 00:14:21 2.3 Post-Roman era 00:18:52 2.4 Medieval Wales 00:26:53 2.5 Industrial Wales 00:30:21 2.6 Modern Wales 00:30:30 2.6.1 Early 20th century 00:33:12 2.6.2 Mid 20th century 00:34:33 2.6.3 Late 20th century 00:37:28 2.6.4 Devolution 00:39:05 3 Government and politics 00:41:31 3.1 Composition of the Assembly 00:44:33 3.2 Areas of responsibility 00:46:29 3.2.1 Foreign relations 00:47:26 3.3 Local government 00:48:10 4 Law and order 00:51:56 5 Geography and natural history 00:58:14 5.1 Geology 00:59:23 5.2 Climate 01:05:06 5.3 Flora and fauna 01:08:08 6 Economy 01:12:56 7 Transport 01:15:27 8 Education 01:18:37 9 Healthcare 01:20:47 10 Demography 01:20:56 10.1 Population history 01:22:54 10.2 Current 01:27:47 10.3 Languages 01:31:32 10.4 Religion 01:34:25 11 Culture 01:34:54 11.1 Mythology 01:36:24 11.2 Literature in Wales 01:42:20 11.3 Museums and libraries 01:43:34 11.4 Visual arts 01:47:46 11.5 National symbols and anthem 01:50:29 11.6 Sport 01:55:11 11.7 Media 01:59:43 11.8 Cuisine 02:01:01 11.9 Performing arts 02:01:10 11.9.1 Music 02:04:02 11.9.2 Drama 02:06:10 11.9.3 Dance 02:08:07 11.10 Festivals 02:09:27 12 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7994860710847632 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Wales (Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] (listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate. Welsh national identity emerged among the Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. Llywelyn ap Gruffudd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century. The whole of Wales was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542. Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century. Welsh liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party. Welsh national feeling grew over the century; Plaid Cymru was formed in 1925 and the Welsh Language Society in 1962. Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the National Assembly for Wales holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters. At the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, development of the mining and metallurgical industries transformed the country from an agricultural society into an industrial nation; the South Wales Coalfield's exploitation caused a rapid expansion of Wales' population. Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys. Now that the country's traditional extractive and heavy industries have gone or are in decline, Wales' economy depends on the public sector, light and service industries and tourism. Although Wales closely shares its political and social history with the rest of Great Britain, and a majority of the population in most areas speaks English as a first language, the country has retained a distinct cultural identity and is officially bilingual. Over 560,000 Welsh language speakers live in Wales, and the language is spoken by a majority of the population in parts of the north and wes ...
Views: 54 wikipedia tts
Castra | Wikipedia audio article
 
40:50
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Castra Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= In the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, the Latin word castrum (plural castra) was a building, or plot of land, used as a fortified military camp. Castrum was the term used for different sizes of camps including a large legionary fortress, smaller auxiliary forts, temporary encampments, and "marching" forts. The diminutive form castellum was used for fortlets, typically occupied by a detachment of a cohort or a century. In English, the terms Roman fortress, Roman fort, and Roman camp are commonly used for castrum. However, scholastic convention tends toward the use of the words camp, marching camp, and fortress as a translation of castrum.For a list of known castra see List of castra.
Views: 15 wikipedia tts
Oceania | Wikipedia audio article
 
59:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oceania Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Oceania (UK: , US: (listen), ) is a geographic region comprising Australasia, Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Spanning the eastern and western hemispheres, Oceania covers an area of 8,525,989 square kilometres (3,291,903 sq mi) and has a population of 40 million. Situated in the southeast of the Asia-Pacific region, Oceania is the smallest continental grouping in land area and the second smallest in population after Antarctica. The islands at the geographic extremes of Oceania are Bonin Islands, a politically integral part of Japan; Hawaii, a state of the United States; Clipperton Island, a possession of France; the Juan Fernández Islands, belonging to Chile; and the Campbell Islands, belonging to New Zealand. Oceania has a diverse mix of economies from the highly developed and globally competitive financial markets of Australia and New Zealand, which rank high in quality of life and human development index, to the much less developed economies that belong to countries such as of Kiribati and Tuvalu, while also including medium-sized economies of Pacific islands such as Palau, Fiji and Tonga. The largest and most populous country in Oceania is Australia, with Sydney being the largest city of both Oceania and Australia.The first settlers of Australia, New Guinea, and the large islands just to the east arrived between 50,000 and 30,000 years ago. Oceania was first explored by Europeans from the 16th century onward. Portuguese navigators, between 1512 and 1526, reached the Tanimbar Islands, some of the Caroline Islands and west Papua New Guinea. On his first voyage in the 18th century, James Cook, who later arrived at the highly developed Hawaiian Islands, went to Tahiti and followed the east coast of Australia for the first time. The Pacific front saw major action during the Second World War, mainly between Allied powers the United States and Australia, and Axis power Japan. The arrival of European settlers in subsequent centuries resulted in a significant alteration in the social and political landscape of Oceania. In more contemporary times there has been increasing discussion on national flags and a desire by some Oceanians to display their distinguishable and individualistic identity. The rock art of Australian Aborigines is the longest continuously practiced artistic tradition in the world. Puncak Jaya in Papua is often considered the highest peak in Oceania. Most Oceanian countries have a parliamentary representative democratic multi-party system, with tourism being a large source of income for the Pacific Islands nations.
Views: 21 wikipedia tts
Montana | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:46:42
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Montana 00:01:28 1 Etymology and naming history 00:02:51 2 Geography 00:03:37 2.1 Topography 00:08:38 2.1.1 Rivers, lakes and reservoirs 00:09:25 2.1.1.1 Pacific Ocean drainage basin 00:10:22 2.1.1.2 Gulf of Mexico drainage basin 00:12:23 2.1.1.3 Hudson Bay drainage basin 00:12:46 2.1.1.4 Lakes and reservoirs 00:13:38 2.2 Flora and fauna 00:15:21 2.3 Protected lands 00:18:14 2.4 Climate 00:24:11 2.5 Antipodes 00:24:37 3 History 00:27:23 3.1 Montana territory 00:28:48 3.2 Conflicts 00:31:16 3.3 Cattle ranching 00:32:10 3.4 Railroads 00:33:48 3.5 Statehood 00:35:03 3.6 Homesteading 00:39:40 3.7 Montana and World War I 00:44:11 3.8 Depression era 00:44:41 3.9 Montana and World War II 00:46:42 3.10 Other military 00:47:38 3.11 Cold War Montana 00:48:57 4 Demographics 00:51:17 4.1 Intrastate demographics 00:55:11 4.2 Language 00:57:09 4.3 Religion 00:58:05 4.4 Native Americans 01:01:07 4.5 Birth data 01:01:34 5 Economy 01:03:33 6 Education 01:03:42 6.1 Colleges and universities 01:03:51 6.2 Schools 01:06:10 7 Culture 01:07:55 7.1 Major cultural events 01:09:27 7.2 Sports 01:09:35 7.2.1 Professional sports 01:10:08 7.2.2 College sports 01:10:42 7.2.3 Other sports 01:11:17 7.2.4 Olympic competitors 01:12:31 7.2.5 Sporting achievements 01:13:22 7.3 Outdoor recreation 01:13:46 7.3.1 Fishing and hunting 01:15:18 7.3.2 Winter sports 01:17:37 8 Health 01:18:08 9 Media 01:19:16 10 Transportation 01:21:33 11 Law and government 01:21:43 11.1 Constitution 01:25:31 11.2 State government: Executive 01:27:43 11.3 State government: Legislative 01:28:33 11.4 State government: Judicial 01:33:51 11.5 Federal offices and courts 01:37:26 12 Politics 01:41:07 13 Cities and towns 01:42:50 14 State symbols 01:46:23 15 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Montana ( (listen)) is a state in the Northwestern United States. Montana has several nicknames, although none are official, including "Big Sky Country" and "The Treasure State", and slogans that include "Land of the Shining Mountains" and more recently "The Last Best Place".Montana is the 4th largest in area, the 8th least populous, and the 3rd least densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The western half of Montana contains numerous mountain ranges. Smaller island ranges are found throughout the state. In total, 77 named ranges are part of the Rocky Mountains. The eastern half of Montana is characterized by western prairie terrain and badlands. Montana is bordered by Idaho to the west, Wyoming to the south, North Dakota and South Dakota to the east, and the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan to the north. The economy is primarily based on agriculture, including ranching and cereal grain farming. Other significant economic resources include oil, gas, coal, hard rock mining, and lumber. The health care, service, and government sectors also are significant to the state's economy. The state's fastest-growing sector is tourism. Nearly 13 million tourists annually visit Glacier National Park, Yellowstone National Park, the Beartooth Highway, Flathead Lake, Big Sky Resort, and other attractions.
Views: 60 wikipedia tts
University of Pennsylvania | Wikipedia audio article
 
58:01
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: University of Pennsylvania Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The University of Pennsylvania (Penn or UPenn) is a private Ivy League research university located in the University City section of West Philadelphia. Incorporated as The Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn is one of 14 founding members of the Association of American Universities and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution.Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder, advocated an educational program that focused as much on practical education for commerce and public service as on the classics and theology, though his proposed curriculum was never adopted. The university coat of arms features a dolphin on the red chief, adopted directly from the Franklin family's own coat of arms. Penn was one of the first academic institutions to follow a multidisciplinary model pioneered by several European universities, concentrating multiple "faculties" (e.g., theology, classics, medicine) into one institution. It was also home to many other educational innovations. The first school of medicine in North America (Perelman School of Medicine, 1765), the first collegiate business school (Wharton School, 1881) and the first "student union" building and organization (Houston Hall, 1896) were founded at Penn. With an endowment of $12.21 billion (2017), Penn had the seventh largest endowment of all colleges in the United States. All of Penn's schools exhibit very high research activity. In fiscal year 2015, Penn's academic research budget was $851 million, involving more than 4,300 faculty, 1,100 postdoctoral fellows and 5,500 support staff/graduate assistants.As of 2018, distinguished alumni include 14 heads of state, 25 billionaires; 3 United States Supreme Court justices; 33 United States Senators, 42 United States Governors and 158 members of the U.S. House of Representatives; 8 signers of the United States Declaration of Independence; 12 signers of the United States Constitution, and the current President of the United States. In addition, some 35 Nobel laureates, 169 Guggenheim Fellows, 80 members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and many Fortune 500 CEOs have been affiliated with the university.
Views: 46 wikipedia tts
Lesotho | Wikipedia audio article
 
39:57
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesotho 00:00:50 1 History 00:01:09 1.1 Rule of Moshoeshoe I (1822–1868) 00:03:51 1.2 British rule (1868–1966) 00:05:09 1.3 Independence (1966–present) 00:11:53 2 Politics 00:14:20 2.1 Foreign relations 00:15:47 2.2 Law 00:18:34 2.3 Districts 00:19:01 3 Geography 00:19:56 3.1 Climate 00:20:39 3.2 Wildlife 00:21:18 4 Economy 00:28:01 5 Population 00:28:10 5.1 Demographics 00:28:56 5.2 Ethnic groups and languages 00:29:43 5.3 Religion 00:30:33 5.4 Education and literacy 00:32:13 6 Health 00:32:24 7 Security 00:34:59 8 Culture 00:36:05 8.1 Cuisine 00:36:25 8.1.1 Traditional food 00:36:55 9 Social issues 00:39:41 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Lesotho ( (listen), Sotho pronunciation: [lɪ’sʊːtʰʊ]) officially the Kingdom of Lesotho (Sotho: 'Muso oa Lesotho) is an enclaved country within the border of South Africa. It is just over 30,000 km2 (11,583 sq mi) in size and has a population of around 2 million. Its capital and largest city is Maseru. Lesotho was previously the British Crown Colony of Basutoland, but it declared independence from the United Kingdom on 4 October 1966. It is now a fully sovereign state that is a member of the United Nations, the Commonwealth of Nations, and the Southern African Development Community (SADC). The name Lesotho roughly translates to "the land of the people who speak Sesotho".
Views: 24 wikipedia tts
Labor history of the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:54:35
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_history_of_the_United_States 00:03:16 1 Organized labor prior to 1900 00:04:31 1.1 Legality and iHunt/i (1842) 00:13:33 1.2 Early federations 00:15:17 1.3 Railroad brotherhoods 00:17:21 1.4 Knights of Labor 00:20:45 1.5 American Federation of Labor 00:24:58 1.6 Western Federation of Miners 00:26:28 1.7 Pullman Strike 00:29:10 1.8 Labor Exchanges and Tokens 00:30:49 2 Organized labor 1900–1920 00:32:45 2.1 Coal strikes, 1900–1902 00:33:34 2.2 Women's Trade Union League 00:34:47 2.3 Industrial Workers of the World 00:37:29 2.4 Government and labor 00:40:26 2.5 World War I 00:41:56 2.6 Strikes of 1919 00:42:39 2.6.1 Coal Strike of 1919 00:44:18 2.6.2 Women telephone operators win strike in 1919 00:45:28 3 Weakness of organized labor 1920–1929 00:49:36 3.1 Great Railroad Strike of 1922 00:51:23 4 Organized labor 1929–1955 00:51:38 4.1 The Great Depression and organized labor 00:53:46 4.2 The Norris-La Guardia Anti-Injunction Act of 1932 00:55:33 4.3 FDR and the National Industrial Recovery Act 00:59:30 4.4 The American Federation of Labor: craft unionism vs. industrial unionism 01:02:04 4.5 John L. Lewis and the CIO 01:06:59 4.6 Upsurge in World War II 01:09:45 4.7 Walter Reuther and UAW 01:10:49 4.8 PAC and politics of 1940s 01:12:04 4.8.1 Strike wave of 1945 01:15:18 4.9 Taft-Hartley Act 01:21:19 4.10 Anti-communism 01:24:11 5 Union decline 1955–2016 01:29:03 5.1 AFL and CIO merger 1955 01:32:49 5.2 Conservative attacks 01:35:34 5.3 Civil Rights Movement 01:35:57 5.4 United Farm Workers, 1960s 01:39:24 5.5 Reagan era, 1980s 01:42:26 5.6 Decline of private sector unions 01:44:04 6 2016–present 01:45:29 6.1 Teacher strikes 01:46:44 7 Public-sector unions 01:49:26 7.1 New Deal era 01:50:34 7.2 "Little New Deal" era 01:51:49 7.3 Recent years 01:53:28 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7485380080636301 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The labor history of the United States describes the history of organized labor, US labor law, and more general history of working people, in the United States. Beginning in the 1930s, unions became important components of the Democratic Party. However, some historians have not understood why no Labor Party emerged in the United States, in contrast to Western Europe.The nature and power of organized labor is the outcome of historical tensions among counter-acting forces involving workplace rights, wages, working hours, political expression, labor laws, and other working conditions. Organized unions and their umbrella labor federations such as the AFL–CIO and citywide federations have competed, evolved, merged, and split against a backdrop of changing values and priorities, and periodic federal government intervention. As commentator E. J. Dionne has noted, the union movement has traditionally espoused a set of values—solidarity being the most important, the sense that each should look out for the interests of all. From this followed commitments to mutual assistance, to a rough-and-ready sense of equality, to a disdain for elitism, and to a belief that democracy and individual rights did not stop at the plant gate or the office reception room. Dionne notes that these values are "increasingly foreign to American culture". In most industrial nations the labor movement sponsored its own political parties, with the U.S. as a conspicuous exception. Both major American parties vied for union votes, with the Democrats usually much more successful. Labor unions became a central element of the New Deal Coalition that dominated national politics from the 1930s into the mid-1960s during the Fifth Party System. Liberal Republicans who supported unions in the Northeast lost power after 1964.The history of organized labor has been a specialty of scholars since the 1890s, and has produced a large amount of scholarly literature fo ...
Views: 44 wikipedia tts
History of the Jews in South Africa | Wikipedia audio article
 
28:17
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of the Jews in South Africa Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The history of the Jews in South Africa mainly began under the British Empire, following a general pattern of increased European settlement in the 19th century. The early patterns of Jewish South African history are almost identical to the history of the Jews in the United States but on a much smaller scale, including the period of early discovery and settlement from the late 17th century to the early 19th century. The community grew tenfold between 1880 and 1914, from 4,000 to over 40,000. Jews were instrumental in promoting the extension of diplomatic military ties between Israel and South Africa. South Africa's Jewish community differs from its counterparts in other African countries in that the majority have remained on the continent rather than emigrating to Israel (62% of the maximum 120,000 still remain). Among potential Jewish emigrants, many were likelier to select a destination popular among other South Africans, such as Australia.
Views: 145 wikipedia tts
Judah P. Benjamin | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:10:00
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Judah P. Benjamin 00:02:30 1 Early and personal life 00:08:18 2 Louisiana lawyer 00:11:33 3 Electoral career 00:11:43 3.1 State politician 00:15:36 3.2 Mexican railroad 00:16:44 3.3 Election to the Senate 00:19:20 3.4 Spokesman for slavery 00:23:20 3.5 Secession crisis 00:27:55 4 Confederate statesman 00:28:04 4.1 Attorney General 00:31:39 4.2 Secretary of War 00:38:58 4.3 Confederate Secretary of State 00:39:26 4.3.1 Basis of Confederate foreign policy 00:41:49 4.3.2 Appointment 00:43:27 4.3.3 Early days (1862–1863) 00:48:14 4.3.4 Increasing desperation (1863–1865) 00:52:52 5 Escape 00:57:41 6 Exile 01:03:22 7 Appraisal 01:09:25 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Judah Philip Benjamin, QC (August 11, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was a lawyer and politician who was a United States Senator from Louisiana, a Cabinet officer of the Confederate States and, after his escape to the United Kingdom at the end of the American Civil War, an English barrister. Benjamin was the first Jew to be elected to the United States Senate who had not renounced that faith, and was the first Jew to hold a Cabinet position in North America. Benjamin was born to Sephardic Jewish parents from London, who had moved to St. Croix in the Danish West Indies when it was occupied by Britain during the Napoleonic Wars. Seeking greater opportunities, his family immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in Charleston, South Carolina. Judah Benjamin attended Yale College but left without graduating. He moved to New Orleans, where he read law and passed the bar. Benjamin rose rapidly both at the bar and in politics. He became a wealthy planter and slaveowner and was elected to and served in both houses of the Louisiana legislature prior to his election by the legislature to the US Senate in 1852. There, he was an eloquent supporter of slavery. After Louisiana seceded in 1861, Benjamin resigned as senator and returned to New Orleans. He soon moved to Richmond after Confederate President Jefferson Davis appointed him as Attorney General. Benjamin had little to do in that position, but Davis was impressed by his competence and appointed him as Secretary of War. Benjamin firmly supported Davis, and the President reciprocated the loyalty by promoting him to Secretary of State in March 1862, while Benjamin was being criticized for the rebel defeat at the Battle of Roanoke Island. As Secretary of State, Benjamin attempted to gain official recognition for the Confederacy by France and the United Kingdom, but his efforts were ultimately unsuccessful. To preserve the Confederacy as military defeats made its situation increasingly desperate, he advocated freeing and arming the slaves late in the war, but his proposals were only partially accepted in the closing month of the war. When Davis fled the Confederate capital of Richmond in early 1865, Benjamin went with him. He left the presidential party and was successful in escaping from the mainland United States, but Davis was captured by Union troops. Benjamin sailed to Great Britain, where he settled and became a barrister, again rising to the top of his profession before retiring in 1883. He died in Paris the following year.
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Coolie | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Coolie 00:01:26 1 Etymology 00:02:32 2 History of the coolie trade 00:05:20 2.1 Chinese coolies 00:14:23 2.2 Indian coolies 00:21:21 2.3 Sex ratios and intermarriage among coolies 00:25:19 2.4 Legislation 00:26:01 3 Modern use 00:29:59 4 In art, entertainment, and media 00:30:08 4.1 Films 00:30:19 4.2 Television 00:32:54 4.3 Books 00:33:14 4.4 Music 00:33:41 4.5 Other 00:34:05 5 See also 00:34:30 6 Notes Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The word coolie (also spelled koelie, kuli, cooli, cooly and quli); (Hindi: कुली, Bengali: কুলি, Gujarati: કૂલી, Punjabi: ਕੁਲੀ, Tamil: கூலி, Telugu: కూలీ, Kannada: ಕೂಲೀ, Malayalam: കൂലി, Sinhala: කූලී, Urdu: ٹھنڈا‬, Chinese: 苦力, Persian: کولی) meaning a labourer, has a variety of other implications and is sometimes regarded as offensive or a pejorative, depending upon the historical and geographical context. It is similar, in many respects, to the Spanish term peon, although both terms are used in some countries, with slightly differing implications. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, coolie was usually a term implying an indentured labourer from South Asia, South East Asia or China. In South Asia, it is now a commonly used and inoffensive word for workers in unskilled manual labour, especially porters at railway stations.However, coolie is now regarded as derogatory and/or a racial slur in the Caribbean, Africa, Oceania, North America, Southeast Asia and Europe – in reference to people from Asia. This is particularly so in South Africa, East Africa, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana, Suriname, Jamaica, Mauritius, Fiji, and the Malay Peninsula. In 2000, the parliament of South Africa enacted the Promotion of Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act, which has among its primary objectives the prevention of hate speech terms such as coolie (koelie).
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List of slaves | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: List of slaves 00:00:26 1 A 00:08:00 2 B 00:11:53 3 C 00:16:41 4 D 00:19:41 5 E 00:24:22 6 F 00:25:49 7 G 00:28:57 8 H 00:31:33 9 I 00:33:14 10 J 00:42:19 11 K 00:43:42 12 L 00:47:16 13 M 00:55:40 14 N 00:57:32 15 O 00:58:59 16 P 01:03:58 17 Q 01:04:33 18 R 01:07:44 19 S 01:13:20 20 T 01:16:29 21 U 01:16:50 22 V 01:18:53 23 W 01:21:12 24 X 01:21:25 25 Y 01:22:32 26 Z 01:23:45 27 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Slavery is a social-economic system under which persons are enslaved: deprived of personal freedom and forced to perform labor or services without compensation. These people are referred to as slaves. The following is a list of historical people who were enslaved at some point during their lives, in alphabetical order by first name. Several names have been added under the letter representing the person's last name.
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Eritrea | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Eritrea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Eritrea (; ( listen)), , officially the State of Eritrea is a country in the Horn of Africa, with its capital at Asmara. It is bordered by Sudan in the west, Ethiopia in the south, and Djibouti in the southeast. The northeastern and eastern parts of Eritrea have an extensive coastline along the Red Sea. The nation has a total area of approximately 117,600 km2 (45,406 sq mi), and includes the Dahlak Archipelago and several of the Hanish Islands. Its toponym Eritrea is based on the Greek name for the Red Sea (Ἐρυθρὰ Θάλασσα Erythra Thalassa), which was first adopted for Italian Eritrea in 1890. Eritrea is a multi-ethnic country, with nine recognized ethnic groups in its population of around 5 million. Most residents speak languages from the Afroasiatic family, either of the Ethiopian Semitic languages or Cushitic branches. Among these communities, the Tigrinyas make up about 55% of the population, with the Tigre people constituting around 30% of inhabitants. In addition, there are a number of Nilo-Saharan-speaking Nilotic ethnic minorities. Most people in the territory adhere to Christianity or Islam.The Kingdom of Aksum, covering much of modern-day Eritrea and northern Ethiopia, was established during the first or second centuries AD. It adopted Christianity around the middle of the fourth century. In medieval times much of Eritrea fell under the Medri Bahri kingdom, with a smaller region being part of Hamasien. The creation of modern-day Eritrea is a result of the incorporation of independent, distinct kingdoms and sultanates (for example, Medri Bahri and the Sultanate of Aussa) eventually resulting in the formation of Italian Eritrea. After the defeat of the Italian colonial army in 1942, Eritrea was administered by the British Military Administration until 1952. Following the UN General Assembly decision, in 1952, Eritrea would govern itself with a local Eritrean parliament but for foreign affairs and defense it would enter into a federal status with Ethiopia for a period of 10 years. However, in 1962 the government of Ethiopia annulled the Eritrean parliament and formally annexed Eritrea. But the Eritreans that argued for complete Eritrean independence since the ouster of the Italians in 1941, anticipated what was coming and in 1960 organized the Eritrean Liberation Front in opposition. In 1991, after 30 years of continuous armed struggle for independence, the Eritrean liberation fighters entered the capital city, Asmara, in victory. Eritrea is a one-party state in which national legislative elections have never been held since independence. According to Human Rights Watch, the Eritrean government's human rights record is among the worst in the world. The Eritrean government has dismissed these allegations as politically motivated. The compulsory military service requires long, indefinite conscription periods, which some Eritreans leave the country to avoid. Because all local media is state-owned, Eritrea was also ranked as having the second-least press freedom in the global Press Freedom Index, behind only North Korea. The sovereign state of Eritrea is a member of the African Union, the United Nations, and the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, and is an observer in the Arab League alongside Brazil, Venezuela, India and Turkey.
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Utah | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Utah 00:01:58 1 Etymology 00:02:54 2 History 00:03:03 2.1 Pre-Columbian 00:03:53 2.2 Spanish exploration (1540) 00:05:40 2.3 Latter Day Saint settlement (1847) 00:09:06 2.4 Utah Territory (1850–1896) 00:15:33 2.5 20th century 00:18:18 3 Geography 00:24:10 3.1 Climate 00:30:28 3.2 Wildlife 00:30:44 3.2.1 Mammals 00:31:22 3.2.2 Birds 00:31:30 3.2.3 Insects 00:32:16 3.3 Vegetation 00:32:28 4 Demographics 00:33:38 4.1 Health and fertility 00:34:41 4.2 Ancestry and race 00:36:38 4.3 Religion 00:39:37 4.4 Languages 00:40:26 4.5 Age and gender 00:40:49 5 Economy 00:43:14 5.1 Taxation 00:43:49 5.2 Tourism 00:46:31 5.2.1 Branding 00:47:27 5.3 Mining 00:48:53 5.3.1 Incidents 00:49:22 5.4 Energy 00:49:32 5.4.1 Potential to use renewable energy sources 00:50:07 6 Transportation 00:53:30 7 Law and government 00:54:34 7.1 Counties 00:55:18 7.2 Women's rights 00:56:02 7.3 Free-range parenting 00:56:28 7.4 Constitution 00:56:55 7.5 Alcohol, tobacco and gambling laws 00:58:06 7.6 Same-sex marriage 00:59:06 7.7 Politics 01:05:32 8 Major cities and towns 01:07:40 9 Colleges and universities 01:07:50 10 Culture 01:07:59 10.1 Sports 01:12:10 10.2 Entertainment 01:12:30 10.2.1 Books 01:14:43 10.2.2 Film 01:15:20 10.2.3 Video Games 01:15:54 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Utah ( YOO-taw, -tah listen) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah is the 13th-largest by area, 31st-most-populous, and 10th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah has a population of more than 3 million according to the Census estimate for July 1, 2016. Urban development is mostly concentrated in two areas: the Wasatch Front in the north-central part of the state, which contains approximately 2.5 million people; and Washington County in Southern Utah, with over 160,000 residents. Utah is bordered by Colorado to the east, Wyoming to the northeast, Idaho to the north, Arizona to the south, and Nevada to the west. It also touches a corner of New Mexico in the southeast. Approximately 62% of Utahns are reported to be members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), making Utah the only state with a majority population belonging to a single church. This greatly influences Utahn culture and daily life. The LDS Church's world headquarters is located in Salt Lake City.The state is a center of transportation, education, information technology and research, government services, mining, and a major tourist destination for outdoor recreation. In 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau estimated that Utah had the second fastest-growing population of any state. St. George was the fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States from 2000 to 2005. Utah also has the 14th highest median average income and the least income inequality of any U.S. state. A 2012 Gallup national survey found Utah overall to be the "best state to live in" based on 13 forward-looking measurements including various economic, lifestyle, and health-related outlook metrics.
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