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HOW THEY FAKE-The Fossil Record. TRILOBITES, Backfire and PROVE GOD's Creation/Judgement
 
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HOW THEY FAKE-The Fossil Record. TRILOBITES, Backfire and PROVE GOD's Creation/Judgement
The 10 Oldest Fossils, and What They Say About Evolution
 
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Wouldn’t it be cool to be able to point at a fossil and know that it’s the first, say, plant? Well... yeah! But it's not that easy! Scientists are always making new discoveries that throw all our old assumptions into question, but we've put together a list of the oldest fossils of their kind that we know of so far! If you liked this video, check out more videos about natural history and paleontology on SciShow's sister channel, Eons: https://www.youtube.com/eons Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, Andreas Heydeck, Justin Lentz, Will and Sonja Marple, Benny, Chris Peters, Tim Curwick, Philippe von Bergen, Patrick, Fatima Iqbal, Lucy McGlasson, Mark Terrio-Cameron, Accalia Elementia, Kathy & Tim Philip, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Thomas J., and Patrick D. Ashmore. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: http://www.techinsider.io/oldest-fossils-ever-discovered-2015-10 http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2015/10/scientists-may-have-found-earliest-evidence-life-earth http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/bacteria/cyanofr.html http://www.fossilmuseum.net/Tree_of_Life/Stromatolites.htm http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3478915.stm http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/palaeofiles/fossilgroups/crustacea/fossils.html http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/cambrian/burgess.html http://burgess-shale.rom.on.ca/en/fossil-gallery/view-species.php?id=32 http://paleobiology.si.edu/burgess/canadaspis.html http://palaeos.com/vertebrates/vertebrata/craniata.html#Haikouichthys http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v520/n7548/full/nature14437.html https://nature.ca/notebooks/english/coalrep.htm http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/h/hylonomus.html https://finstofeet.com/2012/01/05/coming-of-the-amniotes/ http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_news/newsid_9079000/9079963.stm http://www.livescience.com/15734-oldest-placental-mammal.html http://www.nature.com/news/rival-species-recast-significance-of-first-bird-1.16469 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v520/n7548/full/nature14438.html http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/o/obruchevichthys.html http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/species/e/elginerpeton.html http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v373/n6513/abs/373420a0.html http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100106-tetrapod-tracks-oldest-footprints-nature-evolution-walking-land/ http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evolibrary/news/110901_earlymammals http://www.slate.com/articles/video/video/2013/09/first_face_entelognathus_primordialis_the_fish_that_is_changing_evolutionary.html http://www.nature.com/news/ancient-fish-face-shows-roots-of-modern-jaw-1.13823
Views: 977404 SciShow
Exploring Fossil Records, How Fossils Are Formed, Interesting & Educational Videos for Kids
 
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Are you ready to become a Paleontologist? Complete the quest by discovering fossils in four climates. This lesson includes practical exercises. Recommended for grade 1. Kids Educ SUBSCRIBE TO US http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc?sub_confirmation=1 To see the more kids movies go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc
Fossil Types for beginners
 
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Fossil Types for beginners In this video, I review five types of fossils. I cover mineralization, carbonization, molds and casts, trace fossils, and original material. * * Warning The original materials contains a picture of a frozen body that is estimated to be thousands of years old. For more Life Science videos and summaries see, http://www.moomoomath.com/Middle-School-Science-and-Biology.html
Breaking News  - Experts uncover 530-million-year-old trilobite fossil
 
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An 'exceptional' 530-million-year-old fossil contains what could be the oldest eye ever discovered, according to researchers.The remains of the extinct sea creature include an early form of the eye seen in many of today's animals, including crabs, bees and dragonflies.Experts made the find while examining the well-preserved fossil of a hard-shelled species called a trilobite.The right eye of the fossil was partly worn away, giving researchers a clear view inside the organ. This revealed details of the eye's structure and function, and how it differs from modern compound eyes. The species had poor vision compared with many animals today but it could identify predators and obstacles in its path, researchers say. Its eye consists of approximately 100 ommatidia, which are situated relatively far apart compared to contemporary compounds eyes, the team says. Unlike modern compound eyes, the fossil's eye does not have a lens. This is likely because the primitive species - called Schmidtiellus reetae - lacked parts of the shell needed for lens formation.Experts from the University of Edinburgh were among the team that made the discovery on a fossil that was unearthed in Estonia.These ancestors of spiders and crabs lived in coastal waters during the Palaeozoic era, between 541 and 251 million years ago.They found the ancient creature had a primitive form of compound eye, an optical organ that consists of arrays of tiny visual cells, called ommatidia, similar to those of present-day bees.Researchers believe their findings suggest compound eyes have changed little over 500 million years.Professor Euan Clarkson, of the university's school of geosciences, said: 'This exceptional fossil shows us how early animals saw the world around them hundreds of millions of years ago.'Remarkably, it also reveals that the structure and function of compound eyes has barely changed in half a billion years.'The right eye of the fossil was partly worn away, giving researchers a clear view inside the organ.This revealed details of the eye's structure and function, and how it differs from modern compound eyes.The species had poor vision compared with many animals today but it could identify predators and obstacles in its path, researchers say.Its eye consists of approximately 100 ommatidia, which are situated relatively far apart compared to contemporary compounds eyes, the team says.Unlike modern compound eyes, the fossil's eye does not have a lens.This is likely because the primitive species - called Schmidtiellus reetae - lacked parts of the shell needed for lens formation, the team says.Professor Brigitte Schoenemann, of the University of Cologne, who was involved in the study, said: 'This may be the earliest example of an eye that it is possible to find.'Older specimens in sediment layers below this fossil contain only traces of the original animals, which were too soft to be fossilised and have disintegrated over time.'The team also revealed that only a few million years l AutoNews- Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5155559/Experts-uncover-530-million-year-old-trilobite-fossil.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
Views: 95 US Sciencetech
What are Brachiopods?
 
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Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany is a graduate level course in paleontology at Utah State University, which covers the major groups of marine invertebrates, fossil plants, and the important techniques and tools used in the field of paleontology. It covers ichnology, fossil preservation, taphonomy, ontogeny, cladistics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, extinction and evolutionary rates, and many other tools used by professional paleontologists in the study of fossils and their importance in the field of geology. Course lectures are produced and broadcast from the Uintah Basin Campus in Vernal, Utah. If you like more information about the course and becoming a student at Utah State University check out this website: http://geology.usu.edu
Views: 15331 Benjamin Burger
8 Weirdest Fossils Ever Discovered
 
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From a spider attack that's been immortalised in amber to prehistoric porn, we count eight of the weirdest fossils ever discovered Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDDGuides Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDDGuides Gaming Channel: http://www.youtube.com/TheDDGuides Gaming Livestream: http://www.twitch.tv/dangerdolan Animation channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/superplanetdolan Click here for the written version of this video: http://www.planetdolan.com/8-weirdest-fossils-ever-discovered/ Come work for PLANET DOLAN! You can find job listings here: http://www.planetdolan.com/planet-dolan-jobs-opportunities/ Legal notes --- Video narrated by Pringle the One, check out his channel here: https://www.youtube.com/PringleTheOne Video produced by Planet Dolan PTY LTD and Danger Dolan Image credits & information sources for this video: http://pastebin.com/N9KUJkT0 Planet Dolan PTY LTD and Danger Dolan™ have made reasonable inquiries within the timeframe available to identify the source of any images used and attribute the source accordingly. "Oppressive Gloom" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ "Shades of Spring" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Outro song: “Sunny Side Up” Jim Kulakowski (jimkulakowski.com) http://jimkulakowski.com/sunny-side-up/
Views: 1900021 Planet Dolan
ULLresearch: Fossil record of the Canary Islands. Over 140 million years of Natural History
 
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This video is evidence of the broad and varied Fossil Record of the Canary Islands, preserved in the geological context of volcanic and oceanic islands. It includes sediments of the Mesozoic ocean floor with ammonite fossils, remains of ancient beach lines of the Neogene and Quaternary periods, fossils of terrestrial gastropods and fossil traces of bees and other insects preserved in paleosoils and palaedunes, as well as the remains of vertebrates, chiefly found in volcanic caves. Of particular note is the value of the study of the Fossil Record of the Canary Islands for two areas of research developed by the Paleontology Area at the University of La Laguna: Biodiversity Conservation Paleontology, which allows us to discover extinct species, to differentiate between invasive and endemic species, to determine the distribution and abundance of ancient endangered species and to look for the best strategy for their reintroduction. Secondly, we work towards establishing the scientific, cultural and socioeconomic value of paleontological sites in order to offer new cultural and tourist products. In the Canary Islands, where the most important economic sector is tourism, the results of these studies will help to stimulate and diversify this sector, and, hence, the economic development of the islands. Translation: Minerva Gutiérrez (revisions by Sally Burgess) Dubbing: Danielle Perkins --- Creative Commons: Reconocimiento - No Comercial - Sin Obra Derivada (CC BY NC ND). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.es_ES
Trilobite song
 
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Awesome!!!!!
Views: 892 Narwhal27
The Missing Links in the Fossil Record
 
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Dr. Stephen Meyer and Dr. John Ankerberg explore the problems with neo-Darwinism, and the suddenness of the Cambrian Explosion. #
Views: 16883 John Ankerberg Show
What are Cnidarians and what has their fossil record revealed about the history of life?
 
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Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany is a graduate level course in paleontology at Utah State University, which covers the major groups of marine invertebrates, fossil plants, and the important techniques and tools used in the field of paleontology. It covers ichnology, fossil preservation, taphonomy, ontogeny, cladistics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, extinction and evolutionary rates, and many other tools used by professional paleontologists in the study of fossils and their importance in the field of geology. Course lectures are produced and broadcast from the Uintah Basin Campus in Vernal, Utah. If you like more information about the course and becoming a student at Utah State University check out this website: http://geology.usu.edu
Views: 1954 Benjamin Burger
Evidences for Evolution - Homologous Organs, Analogous Organs and Fossils
 
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CBSE class 10 Science - Heredity and Evolution - Understand the difference between Homologous Organs, Analogous organs and fossils with help of the examples. How the fossils are formed? Homologous organs have similar basic structure but perform different functions. Analogous organs perform same functions but have different structure or basic design. Fossils provide the evidence that the present organisms have evolved from the preexisting organisms. About PrepOngo: Best Online Learning App which provides CBSE class 10 interactive video lectures, NCERT solutions, written study material, solved examples, in chapter quizzes and practice problems for Science (Physics, Chemistry, Biology) and Mathematics. We try to help the students understand lessons by visualising the concepts through illustrative and interactive videos, practice from large question banks and evaluate and improve yourself continuously. Online Live courses are also offered for CBSE boards, JEE Mains, JEE-Advanced, NEET and Board preparation for class 10, 11 and 12 For all CBSE class 10 Science and Maths video lectures download the Android App: https://goo.gl/HJwkhw Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://goo.gl/KSsWP2
Views: 55357 PrepOnGo
19. The Fossil Record and Life's History
 
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Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (EEB 122) The fossil record holds a lot of evolutionary information that can't be seen on shorter time scales, although the more recent fossil record is more complete. Among other things, the fossil record demonstrates that extinctions can open up ecological space for new speciation and radiation, and that life forms tend to begin small and evolve to be bigger over time. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 04:18 - Chapter 2. Cambrian Animal Radiation 14:52 - Chapter 3. Plant Radiation and Vertebrates Coming Ashore 24:39 - Chapter 4. Patterns in Radiation of Life 31:46 - Chapter 5. Vanished Communities of Life 40:21 - Chapter 6. Stasis 46:57 - Chapter 7. Summary Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
Views: 13101 YaleCourses
Trilobites
 
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Trilobites are often mentioned as miracles of creation. This video tackles some of those issues. Ref. Trilobite! Eyewitness to Evolution by Richard Fortey. Classic Web site - http://www.trilobites.info/
Views: 17711 Darwinsgift
Niles Eldredge: Trilobites and Punctuated Equilibria
 
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In the late 1960s, Curator Emeritus Niles Eldredge was a graduate student with a passion for trilobite eyes. He had been taught to expect slow and steady change between the specimens of these Devonian arthropods he collected for his dissertation. Only his trilobites were doing one of two things: staying the same, or evolving in leaps. Several years later, Eldredge, along with co-author Stephen Jay Gould, turned his observations into a theory known as “punctuated equilibria”: the idea that species stay relatively the same, or at equilibrium, throughout the fossil record save for rare bursts of evolutionary change. A former Chairman and Curator of Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History, Eldredge remains at the hub of evolutionary discussion and debate, as well as one of the world's experts on trilobites, specializing in mid-Paleozoic phacopids. He has also analyzed the relationship between global extinctions of the geologic past and the present-day biodiversity crisis, as well as the general relationship between extinction and evolution. #trilobites #fossils #extinction #evolution #punctuated equilibria Learn more about Trilobites: http://www.amnh.org/our-research/paleontology/faq/trilobite-website VIDEO CREDITS: VIDEO: AMNH/J. Bauerle PHOTOGRAPHY: Niles Eldredge AMNH/D. Finnin AMNH/S. Thurston Courtesy of Euan Clarkson Courtesy Archives of Michigan Nicole Bechard Ashley Dace JJ Harrison Andy Secher Martin A. Shugar ILLUSTRATION AMNH/Niles Eldredge Northern Arizona University/Ron Blakey The University of Edinburgh/ Euan Clarkson MUSIC: “Gleaming” by Aaron Ashton/Warner Chappell Production Music “Innovative Technologies” by Kriso Lindberg/Warner Chappell Production Music “Squaring the Circle” by Lars Kurz/Warner Chappell Production Music SOUND EFFECTS Freesound/Digifishmusic, exuberate, hanstimm, timgormley, toiletrolltube, UCL Sound SPECIAL THANKS Niles Eldredge Andy Secher Martin A. Shugar This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Transitional fossils? Where?  -- Creation Magazine LIVE! (2-22)
 
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The 'missing links'—hailed as proof for evolution—are examined and debunked. The Creation Magazine LIVE! TV program is a ministry of Creation Ministries International. With offices in seven countries and more PhD scientists than any Christian organization this program features cutting edge science that supports the Bible delivered in a non-technical, visually-rich, discussion-based format. Related Articles: The links are missing (http://creation.com/refuting-evolution-chapter-3-the-links-are-missing) That quote!—about the missing transitional fossils (http://creation.com/pattquote) Fossils Q+A page (http://creation.com/fossils-questions-and-answers) Related Products: Exploring Geology with Mr Hibb (http://creation.com/store_redirect.php?sku=10-1-586) Living Fossils—Evolution: The Grand Experiment Vol-2 (http://creation.com/store_redirect.php?sku=10-1-536) Amazing Fossils (comic book) (http://creation.com/store_redirect.php?sku=00-1-001) The Fossil Record: Unearthing Nature's History of Life (http://creation.com/store_redirect.php?sku=10-2-567)
Views: 10474 CMIcreationstation
Lecture 77a Hyopsodus: Why Common Fossils are Important
 
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I talk about my first science project as a young student on the fossil record of Hyopsodus, a very common fossil, which is found in early Eocene rock layers. Common fossils are important because they allow you to study evolution over long periods of time. Here is the link to the paper I mentioned: Burger, B.J. 2008. Evolution’s tempo and mode during the Eocene Epoch: comparison of two long contemporaneous records of the fossil mammal Hyopsodus in the American West; pp. 41-58, in M. Connely (ed.) The Eocene Epic- Life, Death and Conquest in the Early Tertiary the 14th Annual Symposium on Paleontology and Geology at the Tate Museum, Casper College, Casper Wyoming p. 101. http://www.benjamin-burger.org/papers/Burger-2008-TateMuseum.pdf Further reading: Eldredge, N. and S.J. Gould. 1972. Punctuated equilibria: an alternative to phyletic gradualism; pp. 82-115 in Schopf, T.J.M. (ed.), Models in Paleobiology. Freeman, Cooper and Company, San Francisco, 250 pp. Gingerich, P.D. 1974. Stratigraphic record of early Eocene Hyopsodus and the geometry of mammalian phylogeny. Nature, 248: 107-109. Bown, T.M., P.A. Holroyd, and K.D. Rose. 1994a. Mammal extinctions, body size, and paleotemperature. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, USA. 91:10403-10406. Interested in supporting my YouTube Channel: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=9235837
Views: 565 Benjamin Burger
How has paleontology revolutionize the study of evolution?
 
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Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany is a graduate level course in paleontology at Utah State University, which covers the major groups of marine invertebrates, fossil plants, and the important techniques and tools used in the field of paleontology. It covers ichnology, fossil preservation, taphonomy, ontogeny, cladistics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, extinction and evolutionary rates, and many other tools used by professional paleontologists in the study of fossils and their importance in the field of geology. Course lectures are produced and broadcast from the Uintah Basin Campus in Vernal, Utah. If you like more information about the course and becoming a student at Utah State University check out this website: http://geology.usu.edu
Views: 894 Benjamin Burger
Earth Science: Crash Course History of Science #20
 
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It's Earth Science time!!!! In this field, natural philosophers were asking questions like, what’s up with fossils? Are they the remains of extinct organisms? Or are they so-called “sports of nature”—rocks that just happen to look like living things but don’t /mean/ anything? And most importantly, how old is… everything? *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Erika & Alexa Saur Glenn Elliott, Justin Zingsheim, Jessica Wode, Eric Prestemon, Kathrin Benoit, Tom Trval, Nathan Taylor, Divonne Holmes à Court, Brian Thomas Gossett, Khaled El Shalakany, Indika Siriwardena, SR Foxley, Sam Ferguson, Yasenia Cruz, Eric Koslow, Caleb Weeks, Tim Curwick, D.A. Noe, Shawn Arnold, Ruth Perez, Malcolm Callis, Ken Penttinen, Advait Shinde, William McGraw, Andrei Krishkevich, Rachel Bright, Mayumi Maeda, Kathy & Tim Philip, Jirat, Eric Kitchen, Ian Dundore, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 138764 CrashCourse
'Living Fossils' Aren't Really a Thing
 
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Try CuriosityStream today: http://curiositystream.com/eons Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/DonateEONS Crocodiles, horseshoe crabs and tuatara are animals that have persisted for millions of years, said to have gone unchanged since the days of the dinosaurs. But even the most ancient-looking organisms show us that evolution is always at work. Special thanks to Nobumichi Tamura for allowing us to use his paleoart. Check out his portfolio here: http://spinops.blogspot.com Thanks to Nathan E. Rogers and Studio 252mya for their illustrations. You can find more of their work here: https://252mya.com/gallery/nathan-e-rogers Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: http://www.nature.com/news/oldest-homo-sapiens-fossil-claim-rewrites-our-species-history-1.22114 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v546/n7657/full/nature22336.html http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080327/full/news.2008.695.html http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168952508000036?via%3Dihub http://www.cell.com/trends/genetics/fulltext/S0168-9525(08)00003-6?_returnURL=http%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS0168952508000036%3Fshowall%3Dtrue http://www.jstor.org/stable/2396218?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents http://sp.lyellcollection.org/content/379/1/525.short http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0044985 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01373.x/full https://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/gb-2012-13-1-415
Views: 242866 PBS Eons
48-Million-Year-Old Fossil Found With Unborn Fetus
 
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A remarkable fossil has been found in Germany. The horse-like remains have not only been dated to 48 million years ago, but the animal was also clearly pregnant, as its unborn fetus and some soft tissue still remain preserved. A remarkable fossil has been found in Germany.  The horse-like remains have not only been dated to 48 million years ago, but the animal was clearly pregnant, as its unborn fetus and some soft tissue still remain preserved.  Scientists were even able to identify the placenta and a uterine ligament which places this sample as the earliest such system on record.  Based on a detailed examination of the specimen, the scientists found that the fetus, which is about five inches long, appears to be missing its skull from damage but otherwise seems to be nearly complete in terms of bones.  The animal overall is thought to have been an ancient relative of the horse but with a size more akin to a fox terrier dog than the horses of today.  Despite the size differential, researchers have found that the fossilized uterus has many similarities with modern-day horses, indicating that the reproductive system had already progressed by the Eocene era more than 34 million years ago, if not earlier.  While the animal’s cause of death is still unknown, it is not thought to have been related to the late-stage pregnancy.
Views: 958 GeoBeats News
London Lecture: The Cambrian Alum Shales of Scandinavia and their Remarkable Trilobites
 
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This London Lecture was delivered by Professor Euan Clarkson of the University of Edinburgh on 10 March 2015. Description: During the Cambrian the large continent of Baltica (including modern Scandinavia) lay isolated in the southern hemisphere. The Lower Cambrian of Baltica consists mainly of sandstones, but in the Middle and Upper Cambrian (Furongian) a muddy sequence known as the Alum Shales were deposited. Whereas the Middle Cambrian carries a rich and diverse trilobite fauna, oxygen levels dramatically decreased thereafter, and the uppermost Middle Cambrian bears a fauna consisting only of a single species of agnostoid, Agnostus pisiformis. In the following Furongian, the faunas were dominated by the olenid trilobites, adapted to dysoxic conditions. The Furongian of southern Sweden forms a superb natural laboratory for studying processes and patterns of evolution in the olenids. The rapid turnover of species and superb preservation of the fossils, both in shales and in carbonate concretions, allows evolutionary changes to be assessed both at the micro - and the microevolutionary scale. Also, the dynamics of the evolving faunas can be assessed and their relations with environmental fluctuations established by bed-by-bed collecting and analysis. Moreover since all trilobite growth stages often occur along with the adults, it is possible to establish the complete or partial ontogeny (individual development from the larval stages onwards) of many species, and to explore the relationships between ontogeny and phylogeny. All these separate dimensions will be considered here and particular attention will be given to adaptations of various olenids, and the functions, for example of the extreme spinosity which characterises some genera. Information gained from various lines of evidence from the faunas can be used, along with geochemical approaches to build up a coherent picture of an extinct muddy environment and its inhabitants (which include brachiopods at certain levels, and superbly preserved agnostoids and small phosphatised arthropods). The olenids persisted to the end of the Ordovician but lost their dysoxic adaptations and became part of the normal trilobite fauna.
Views: 3945 GeologicalSociety
Evidence of Evolution 4- Fossil record
 
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Part 4 in a 7 part lecture on EVIDENCE OF EVOLUTION in a flipped General Biology course taught by Wendy Riggs. CC-BY. Watch the whole lecture (all 7 videos) by going to the PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5GRRRmaGVqV5_d9PZkGJytcCfbZs6b70
Views: 1302 Wendy Riggs
World's largest fossil forest uncovered in Illinois
 
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Scientists have found a 307-million-year-old fossil forest beneath the Springfield coal area in Illinois. It is at least 50 times as extensive as the previous discovery, which is so far the largest fossil forest ever found. The fossil forest lies at 250 to 800 feet underground, and extends for up to 100 miles. The compacted remains of the forests are preserved above the coal seams, and the fossils can be seen in the mine ceiling. The study will help in predicting the effects of global warming today. Source: Sky News, BBC
Views: 7352 News Direct
What is Ichnology?
 
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Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany is a graduate level course in paleontology at Utah State University, which covers the major groups of marine invertebrates, fossil plants, and the important techniques and tools used in the field of paleontology. It covers ichnology, fossil preservation, taphonomy, ontogeny, cladistics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, extinction and evolutionary rates, and many other tools used by professional paleontologists in the study of fossils and their importance in the field of geology. Course lectures are produced and broadcast from the Uintah Basin Campus in Vernal, Utah. If you like more information about the course and becoming a student at Utah State University check out this website: http://geology.usu.edu
Views: 1218 Benjamin Burger
America West: Dinosaur National Monument (Utah)
 
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Paleontologist Earl Douglas discovered and began excavating the fossils found on this site in 1909, digging for the Carnegie Museum. In 1915 the Carnegie Quarry's world-class bones of the late-Jurassic dinosaurs were protected in 8-acre Dinosaur National Monument. In today's 210,000-acre national monument one can explore the quarry and the scenic and historic Green and Yampa Rivers -- their canyons, mountains, basins, and archeological sites -- and 23 colorful layers of the Colorado Plateau. The greatly varied rock and soil types combine with elevation and topography to create many habitats with a startling diversity of plant and animal life. The dinosaur quarry is in a rock layer, the Morrison Formation, whose fossils were deposited in so many environments that scientists can reconstruct how the area looked 150 million years ago. About 5 million years ago, rivers began carving today's deep canyons exposing the those many layers and bringing to light the fossilized remains of the early inhabitants of this region. The Dinosaur Exhibit Hall is a shining example of what existed, and perished, in that long-ago era and for the discovery of natural extinction as experienced by today's visitors.
Views: 8286 Edward Rozylowicz
500-million-year-old fossil comes home
 
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A rare and beautiful trilobite fossil is back in its original home in Manuels, a gift from the man who discovered it. Read more: https://goo.gl/YYEUVj Watch more CBCNL Mobile News: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLByp9p2moztIwy1jW9HodB-0_HP-o92Ze »»» Subscribe to CBC NL to watch more videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/cbcnl?sub_confirmation=1 For your daily CBC NL news fix: https://www.cbc.ca/nl CBC NL on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/cbcnl CBC NL on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cbcnl/ CBC NL is now on YouTube. Join us for news, live events, commentary, daily weather, comedy, music, more. Connect with us about what you'd like to see here.
How do you name a new fossil species?
 
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Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany is a graduate level course in paleontology at Utah State University, which covers the major groups of marine invertebrates, fossil plants, and the important techniques and tools used in the field of paleontology. It covers ichnology, fossil preservation, taphonomy, ontogeny, cladistics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, extinction and evolutionary rates, and many other tools used by professional paleontologists in the study of fossils and their importance in the field of geology. Course lectures are produced and broadcast from the Uintah Basin Campus in Vernal, Utah. If you like more information about the course and becoming a student at Utah State University check out this website: http://geology.usu.edu
Views: 1055 Benjamin Burger
What is INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY? What does INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY mean?
 
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What is INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY? What does INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY mean? INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY meaning - INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY definition - INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Invertebrate paleontology (also spelled Invertebrate palaeontology) is sometimes described as Invertebrate paleozoology or Invertebrate paleobiology. Whether it is considered to be a subfield of paleontology, paleozoology, or paleobiology, this discipline is the scientific study of prehistoric invertebrates by analyzing invertebrate fossils in the geologic record. By invertebrates are meant the non-vertebrate creatures of the kingdom Animalia (or Metazoa) in the biotic domain of Eukaryota. By phyletic definition, these many-celled, sub-vertebrate animals lack a vertebral column, spinal column, vertebrae, backbone, or long, full-length notochord -- in contrast, of course, to the vertebrates in the one phylum of Chordata. Relatedly, invertebrates have never had a cartilaginous or boney internal skeleton, with its skeletal supports, gill slits, ribs and jaws. Finally, throughout geologic time, invertebrates have remained non-craniate creatures; that is, they never developed a cranium, nerve-chord brain, skull, or hard protective braincase (unlike many vertebrates). In the many decades since Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck, a pioneering biologist and evolutionist, first conceptualized and coined the category "Invertebrata" (between 1793 and 1801) and the term "Biology" (in 1802), zoology has come to recognize that the non-vertebrate category is not a scientifically valid, monophyletic taxon. Evolutionary biology and developmental biology (a.k.a. "evo-devo") now consider the term "Invertebrata" to be both polyphyletic and paraphyletic. Nevertheless, most earth science departments continue to employ this term; and paleontologists find it both useful and practical in evaluating fossil invertebrates and—consequently -- invertebrate evolution. However, there is one contemporary caveat: Paleobiologists and microbiologists in the 21st century no longer classify one-celled "animal-like" microbes either as invertebrates or as animals. For example, the commonly fossilized foraminifera ("forams") and radiolarians -- zooplankton both formerly grouped under either an animal phylum or animal sub-kingdom called Protozoa ("first animals") -- are now placed in the kingdom or super-kingdom Protista or Protoctista (and thus called protists or protoctists). Thus modern invertebrate paleontologists deal largely with fossils of this more strictly defined Animal Kingdom (excepting Phylum Chordata), Phylum Chordata being the exclusive focus of vertebrate paleontology. Protist fossils are then the main focus of micropaleontology, while plant fossils are the chief focus paleobotany. Together these four represent the traditional taxonomic divisions of paleontologic study. When it comes to the fossil record, soft-bodied and minuscule invertebrates—such as hydras, jellies, flatworms, hairworms, nematodes, ribbon worms, rotifers and roundworms -- are infrequently fossilized. As a result, paleontologists and other fossil hunters must often rely on trace fossils, microfossils, or chemofossil residue when scouting for these prehistoric creatures. Hard-bodied and large invertebrates are much-more commonly preserved; typically as sizeable macrofossils. These invertebrates are more frequently preserved because their hard parts—for example, shell, armor, plates, tests, exoskeleton, jaws or teeth -- are composed of silica (silicon dioxide), calcite or aragonite (both forms of calcium carbonate), chitin (a protein often infused with tricalcium phosphate), or keratin (an even-more complex protein), rather than the vertebrate bone (hydroxyapatite) or cartilage of fishes and land-dwelling tetrapods. The chitinous jaws of annelids (such as the marine scolecodonts) are sometimes preserved as fossils; while many arthropods and inarticulate brachiopods have easily fossilized hard parts of calcite, chitin, or keratin. The most common and often-found macrofossils are the very hard calcareous shells of articulate brachiopods (that is, the everyday "lampshells") and of mollusks (such as the omnipresent clams, snails, mussels and oysters). On the other hand, non-shelly slugs and non-tubiferous worms (for instance, earthworms) have only occasionally been preserved due to their lack of hard parts.
Views: 269 The Audiopedia
Evolution Minute 002 - Mammal Fossils Found in the Wrong Layers?
 
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Mammal Fossils Found in the wrong layers? REFERENCES: “The Truth” http://thetruthwins.com/archives/fact-check-did-bill-nye-tell-a-huge-lie-about-the-fossil-layers The so-called ‘Age of Dinosaurs’ Why there never was a ‘land before time’ millions of years ago! by Calvin Smith http://creation.com/so-called-age-of-dinosaurs Cretaceous duck ruffles feathers http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4187287.stm Definitive fossil evidence for the extant avian radiation in the Cretaceous http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v433/n7023/full/nature03150.html Editor's Summary http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v433/n7023/edsumm/e050120-10.html Vegavis iaai , Fossil Bird http://www.digimorph.org/specimens/Vegavis_iaai/ “The Falsity of Living Fossils” http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/34927/title/The-Falsity-of-Living-Fossils/ From the Journal Nature: A Mesozoic gliding mammal from northeastern China. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v444/n7121/full/nature05234.html#Other-gliding-and-arboreal-features Swimming with dinos from the Museum Victoria http://museumvictoria.com.au/about/mv-news/2008/swimming-with-dinos/ The oldest platypus and its bearing on divergence timing of the platypus and echidna claces. http://www.pnas.org/content/105/4/1238.full You can also examine this fossil at DigiMorph http://www.digimorph.org/specimens/Teinolophos_trusleri/216575/ The “Early Aquatic Mammal” links to A Swimming Mammaliaform from the Middle Jurassic and Ecomorphological Diversification of Early Mammals From the Journal Science. Abstract http://www.sciencemag.org/content/311/5764/1123.abstract?sid=c556b8f8-a52d-4ece-b969-70f80114f1fe Dinosaur-eating mammal discovered in China the reference is the Natural History Museum site. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/about-us/news/2005/jan/news_3711.html Original article in Nature: Large Mesozoic mammals fed on young dinosaurs. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v433/n7022/full/nature03102.html “Organic Evolution Considered” by Alfred Fairhurst https://books.google.com/books?id=6mBCAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=%E2%80%9COrganic+Evolution+Considered%E2%80%9D+by+Alfred+Fairhurst&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwirz5jl75fNAhVYzmMKHU9IBuwQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
Views: 545 meleagrisfelis
Exploring Fossils (Accessible Preview)
 
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Students learn why fossils are often referred to as "windows to the past." The basic requirements for fossil formation are identified. Examples of various fossils highlight different types of fossil preservation, including petrification, imprints, molds and casts, freezing, amber fossilization, and preservation in tar pits. Finally, various uses of fossils are discussed. Additional terminology and concepts: cement, paleontology, fossil fuels, preserved remains, paleontologist, sediments, and limestone. Producer/Distributor: VISUAL LEARNING COMPANY http://www.visuallearningsys.com/ [email protected] Toll Free: 800-453-8481 Production Year: 2008 Grade Level: 4-8 Registered DCMP members can access this title for free at the following URL: http://www.dcmp.org/Catalog/TitleDetail.aspx?TID=7490
Views: 692 dcmpnad
soft tissue in dino & other fossils(notes)-nothing in science justifies millions of years ages
 
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(See notes part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynXwAo9V_pY) Dr. Kaye labeled Dr. Schweitzer's findings as biofilm. But,Kaye's paper refers to pores in the cells that are NOT consistent with mineral origins as well as admitting that there was soft tissue(osteocytes) in it. Here's the REASON why Kaye "found" biofilm: "as Kaye examined more fossils,he was puzzled to find similar materials in nearly every bone.Unable to reconcile the notion that so much tissue could have survived for millions of years,he turned to Zbigniew Sawlowicz." http://bacteriality.com/2008/08/26/dino/ He's basically saying that since so much soft tissue would contradict evolution,it couldn't possibly be real soft tissue no matter what the evidence. That's pretty severe bias. Kaye admits,"We are not experts in the field. We are not disagreeing with the fact that their instruments detected protein." http://scintilla.nature.com/node/355642 Dr. Schweitzer points out numerous flaws in Dr. Kaye's dissent: "There really isn't a lot new here,although I really welcome that someone is attempting to look at & repeat the studies we conducted. There are really several errors in wording(& spelling & grammar) in the paper by Kaye et al. that seem to underlie a fundamental misunderstanding of our work,our data & our interpretations. "Something that is not fully appreciated by the outsider is that science is a process. One makes an observation,forms a testable hypothesis about the observation,gathers data,& the data either support or refute the hypothesis. It is then refined & retested. If the hypothesis is tested multiple times,it is strengthened,& eventually moves to become a theory,one of the strongest statements in science. "If one chooses to challenge a hypothesis & the data put forth by another researcher to support it,one is under the obligation to 1. form a hypothesis that provides an alternative to the first; 2. reinterpret the original data presented in such a way that it __better supports__ the new hypothesis than the original,& 3. produce new data that,in addition to the original,more strongly supports the alternative hypothesis than the original. http://scintilla.nature.com/node/380683 "While Kaye et al. address the morphology of the structures we observed,& find their own explanations for these,they do not address the considerable chemical & molecular data we put forth to support our hypothesis of endogeneity. We did propose biofilm production as a possible explanation for the material that we see,but we determined that based upon the data we had,microbial biofilms were not a parsimonious explanation for the data(see Schweitzer et al.,2007,Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B)...there is no evidence in the literature that biofilms form branching _hollow_ tubes as we observe...Kaye et al...do not identify microbial bodies,a hallmark of biofilm....Kaye et al. did not address our immunological data,& controls. They did not address the phylogenetic analyses of sequence as reported by Organ et al.,2008...Nor did they explain the internal,or 'intracellular' structure we report for observed osteocytes...&finally,they did not state how the rounded structures we reported could persist /_free floating_/ in a hollow biofilm...the structures we observed did not exhibit the microcryst structure know to characterize framboids...We continue to test the hypothesis that original material is retained in fossil bone... While we welcome the skepticism of colleagues,we hope that the reviewers & readers hold them to the standards to which we are held. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/loom/2008/08/01/slime-versus-dinosaur/ http://scintilla.nature.com/node/380683 Schweitzer also states. "The idea that biofilms are completely & solely responsible for the origin or source of the structures we reported is not supported," she said by e-mail from a dinosaur dig in Montana.Microscopic views of bones can't explain why the fossil tissues reacted to the immune cells of chickens,for example,& the mammoth ones reacted with elephant cells,she says. Kaye acknowledges his study does not refute the immune responses reported by Schweitzer's team. "They have single handedly pioneered the use of sophisticated chemical analysis & have created a critical bridge between biology & paleontology," he says. http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/2008-07-29-fossils_N.htm There are also quite a few evidences that dinos lived with man. See my creation-soft tissue playlist. 100+ DATING METHODS POINT TO A YOUNG EARTH 1)(for laymen) http://creation.com/age-of-the-earth 2)(more technical) http://www.creationscience.com/onlinebook/AstroPhysicalSciences24.html#wp3303729 & http://www.creationscience.com/onlinebook/AstroPhysicalSciences33.html#wp2534183 http://www.answersingenesis.org/get-answers/topic/radiometric-dating On the fossil order,see: http://storage.amazingdiscoveries.org/assets/files/ADDownloads/Section%20PDFs/The%20Fossil%20Record.pdf
Views: 6172 TruthIsLife7
The Tiniest Fossils - Shelf Life #6
 
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You could easily mistake foraminifera fossils for flecks of dust, but these tiny specimens hold big insights about Earth’s climate. Scientific Assistant Bushra Hussaini, researcher Ellen Thomas, Curator Neil Landman, and intern Shaun Mahmood are preserving this invaluable collection. #foraminifera #climatechange #fossils #microfossils #paleontology #ShelfLife For more about how fossil organisms reveal the record of a changing Earth, head over to the episode website: http://www.amnh.org/shelf-life/shelf-life-06-the-tiniest-fossils This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1203394. PI: Neil Landman. Co-PI: Ruth O’Leary. The Microfossil Digitization and Rehousing Project team would like to thank volunteer Linda Scalbom. Shelf Life is a collection for curious minds—opening doors, pulling out drawers, and taking the lids off some of the incredible, rarely seen items in the American Museum of Natural History. Over 12 episodes, Shelf Life will explore topics like specimen preparation, learn why variety is vital, and meet some of the people who work in the Museum collections. For more, visit http://www.amnh.org/ShelfLife Series Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A2PmDLfWt1Q Episode 1: 33 Million Things https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NR-xl7W0vo Episode 2: Turtles and Taxonomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmXqn9AW2Kc Episode 3: Six Ways to Prepare a Coelacanth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqL17uabbso Episode 4: Skull of the Olinguito https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEYfY0mRc5k Episode 5: How To Time Travel To a Star https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5xJqFtPGAA Episode 6: The Tiniest Fossils https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLSa8cGJixQ Episode 7: The Language Detectives https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92IvcuQF9cg Episode 8: Voyage of the Giant Squid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W47by1jPTPw Episode 9: Kinsey’s Wasps https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHc5l4gQsro Episode 10: The Dinosaurs of Ghost Ranch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=567bv6xmuss Episode 11: Green Grow the Salamanders https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uV9Z-pHr-nE Episode 12: Six Extinctions In Six Minutes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZuwOgcS1W0 *** Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=AMNHOrg Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/AMNHorg Facebook: http://fb.com/naturalhistory Twitter: http://twitter.com/amnh Tumblr: http://amnhnyc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/amnh This video and all media incorporated herein (including text, images, and audio) are the property of the American Museum of Natural History or its licensors, all rights reserved. The Museum has made this video available for your personal, educational use. You may not use this video, or any part of it, for commercial purposes, nor may you reproduce, distribute, publish, prepare derivative works from, or publicly display it without the prior written consent of the Museum. © American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY
Taphonomy results
 
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2007 - Dr. Karen Burns summarizes the results of the Taphonomy experiment
Views: 1340 TIGHARchannel
Fossil Pigment Paints Long Ages into a Corner
 
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http://www.icr.org/article/fossil-pigment-paints-long-ages-into/ Green River Formation Fossil Has Original Soft Tissue http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCEZgw2v4Gg Ancient Dinosaur Blood (68,000,000 Years) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0_3ll3mLSE Fossil Fraud Embarrasses Scientists http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1o5gcb23lI Scientist Draws With Extinct Squid Ink http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4VFDyBoiH4 AMBER EXPOSES EVOLUTION http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0nlWVGLP-w Evolution: The Itsy-Bitsy Spider Fantastic Australian Amber Supports Young World Creation / Evolution Video Play Lists http://hosted.homeserver.com/warneveryone/video_play_lists.htm
Views: 583 Dave Flang
Can scientists draw firm conclusions from fossil finds?
 
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John Reader, author of Missing Links: In Search of Human Origins, discusses substantiating evidence versus new discoveries.
SKELETONS FOSSILS EXPLORATION For Kids Dinosaur Toy Review
 
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SKELETONS FOSSILS EXPLORATION dinosaur video Dinosaurs are a diverse group of animals of the clade Dinosauria that first appeared during the Triassic period. Although the exact origin and timing of the evolution of dinosaurs is the subject of active research, the current scientific consensus places their origin between 231 and 243 million years ago. They became the dominant terrestrial vertebrates after the Triassic–Jurassic extinction event 201 million years ago. Their dominance continued through the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods and ended when the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event led to the extinction of most dinosaur groups 66 million years ago. Until the late 20th century, all groups of dinosaurs were believed to be extinct; however, the fossil record indicates that birds are the modern descendants of feathered dinosaurs, having evolved from theropod ancestors during the Jurassic Period, and are now termed "avian dinosaurs". As such, birds were the only dinosaur lineage to survive the mass extinction event. Throughout the remainder of this article, the term "dinosaur" is sometimes used generically to refer to both the avian and non-avian dinosaurs combined, while at other times it is used to refer to the non-avian dinosaurs specifically, and the avian dinosaurs are sometimes simply referred to as "birds". This article deals primarily with non-avian dinosaurs. Dinosaurs are a varied group of animals from taxonomic, morphological and ecological standpoints. Birds, at over 10000 living species, are the most diverse group of vertebrates besides perciform fish. Using fossil evidence, paleontologists have identified over 500 distinct genera and more than 1000 different species of non-avian dinosaurs. Dinosaurs are represented on every continent by both extant species and fossil remains. Some are herbivorous, others carnivorous. While dinosaurs were ancestrally bipedal, many extinct groups included quadrupedal species, and some were able to shift between these stances. Elaborate display structures such as horns or crests are common to all dinosaur groups, and some extinct groups developed skeletal modifications such as bony armor and spines. Evidence suggests that egg laying and nest building are additional traits shared by all dinosaurs. While the modern-day surviving lineage of dinosaurs (birds) are generally small due to the constraints of flight, many prehistoric dinosaurs were large-bodied—the largest sauropod dinosaurs are estimated to have reached lengths of 39.7 meters (130 feet)[10] and heights of 18 meters (59 feet)[11] and were the largest land animals of all time. Still, the idea that non-avian dinosaurs were uniformly gigantic is a misconception based in part on preservation bias, as large, sturdy bones are more likely to last until they are fossilized. Many dinosaurs were quite small: Xixianykus, for example, was only about 50 cm (20 in) long. Although the word dinosaur literally means "terrible lizard", the name is something of an etymological misnomer; even though dinosaurs are reptiles, they are not lizards, nor are they descended from them. Instead, dinosaurs, like many extinct forms of reptile sub-groups, did not exhibit characteristics which were traditionally regarded as reptilian, such as a sprawling limb posture or ectothermy (colloquially referred to as "cold-bloodedness"). Additionally, many other prehistoric animals, including mosasaurs, ichthyosaurs, pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, and Dimetrodon, while often popularly conceived of as dinosaurs, are not taxonomically classified as dinosaurs. Through the first half of the 20th century, before birds were recognized to be dinosaurs, most of the scientific community believed dinosaurs to have been sluggish and cold-blooded. Most research conducted since the 1970s, however, has indicated that all dinosaurs were active animals with elevated metabolisms and numerous adaptations for social interaction. Since the first dinosaur fossils were recognized in the early 19th century, mounted fossil dinosaur skeletons have been major attractions at museums around the world, and dinosaurs have become an enduring part of world culture. The large sizes of some dinosaur groups, as well as their seemingly monstrous and fantastic nature, have ensured dinosaurs' regular appearance in best-selling books and films, such as Jurassic Park. Persistent public enthusiasm for the animals has resulted in significant funding for dinosaur science, and new discoveries are regularly covered by the media.
Views: 278 Dinosaur Toy Review
Living Fossils
 
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Charles Darwin coined the term "living fossils" to describe animals and plants, found alive today, that appear much the same as the fossils of their ancestors in deep rock layers. Since his time, scientists who accept evolution have tried various ways to explain the lack of apparent change in these creatures over long time periods. Scientists who are creationists, however, have interpreted these "living fossils" as evidence of recent creation and against the idea of millions of years of evolution. In this presentation you will learn about "living fossils," "Lazarus taxa," and "Elvis taxa," and what their existence can show us about the history of life on earth.
Fossil Coal Mining Property Example 1
 
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Footage from March 2013. Two-Mile job, located between Paintsville and Inez, Kentucky.
Views: 114 Nathan Wright
How can fossils reveal what the  ancient marine environment was like?
 
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Lecture 09: Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleobotany is a graduate level course in paleontology at Utah State University, which covers the major groups of marine invertebrates, fossil plants, and the important techniques and tools used in the field of paleontology. It covers ichnology, fossil preservation, taphonomy, ontogeny, cladistics, biostratigraphy, paleoecology, extinction and evolutionary rates, and many other tools used by professional paleontologists in the study of fossils and their importance in the field of geology. Course lectures are produced and broadcast from the Uintah Basin Campus in Vernal, Utah. If you like more information about the course and becoming a student at Utah State University check out this website: http://geology.usu.edu
Views: 1267 Benjamin Burger
GEOLOGY part 6 iit jam +coaching tuition analysis 9836793076 notes study material
 
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GEOLOGY part 6 iit jam +coaching tuition analysis 9836793076 notes study material VISIT OUR WEBSITE https://www.souravsirclasses.com/ FOR COMPLETE LECTURES / STUDY MATERIALS /NOTES /GUIDENCE / PAST YEAR SOLVED +SAMPLE PAPAERS /TRICKS /MCQ / SHORT CUT/ VIDEO LECTURES /LIVE + ONLINE CLASSES GIVE US A CALL / WHAST APP AT 9836793076 Also find us at…. BLOGSPOT http://souravdas3366.blogspot.com/ SLIDES ON COURSES https://www.slideshare.net/Souravdas31 TWITTER https://twitter.com/souravdas3366 FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/Sourav-Sirs-... LINKED IN https://www.linkedin.com/in/sourav-da... GOOGLE PLUS https://plus.google.com/+souravdassou... geology iit jam, iit jam geology, iit jam geology preparation geology, geology and geomorphology, geology and mining, geology and soil mechanics, geology and the kids, geology animation, geology as a career, geology as optional for ias, geology audiobook, geology in hindi, geology jobs, geology lab, geology lectures, geology lessons, geology nptel, geology of bahubali, geology of india, geology rocks
The Evidence of Creation and Noah’s Flood
 
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Michael Rood and Kent Hovind reveal the subtle deceit within the distraction in a powerful new series titled Flat Earth and The Evolution Conspiracy. In the Garden of Eden, Satan planted doubt in the minds of men to distract them from the Almighty — and to destroy them. Today, doubt and distraction have given rise to a conspiracy against the Almighty himself, leading even the elect to fall away. Debate and speculation over the Almighty’s creation is much more than opinion — it is the cornerstone of doubt and destruction in the decision to choose between Satan and God. This crucial teaching series serves as both a warning and a weapon in a battle of the mind for every believer. Don’t miss the incredible information on this episode of Shabbat Night Live!
Views: 56116 A Rood Awakening!
Living Universe | Journey To Another Stars - Documentary 4K [2018]
 
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The Earth is Not Alone: https://youtu.be/VymuQC0o7yQ LIVING UNIVERSE is an interstellar adventure that seeks to answer the most profound question of all: are we alone? Based on the latest scientific knowledge, we will take a journey to a planet beyond our solar system in search of life. We ask the world's leading space scientists what we might find if we travel to a neighboring star system. Recent breakthroughs have proven that every star we see in the sky is orbited by at least one planet, many similar to our own Earth. How do we get to these "exoplanets"? Once there, what will we find? And what will it mean for humanity when we discover we are not alone? Our speculative journey through space is set a hundred years in the future - when we have the technology to journey well beyond our solar system. On this first expedition, our star ship Aurora will be piloted not by astronauts, but by the artificial intelligence (A.I.) we call Artemis. We imagine how Artemis travels through space, on its 25-year journey, at one fifth of the speed of light. Its objective is Minerva B, a planet much like our own, with an atmosphere, temperature and liquid water that appears a likely candidate to contain life. With spectacular special effects we will reach and explore a new planet as we seek to answer the most profound question of all: are we alone in the universe? Our guides on this journey are narrator Dr Karl Kruszelnicki and as the voice of our AI, Artemis, real-life astrophysicist, Professor Tamara Davis. Inspired and informed by our rapidly developing knowledge of far-off worlds, our best scientists - including NASA engineers, astrophysicists and astronomers - we will discover that this amazing journey is not only possible, it is inevitable. To venture into distant space is our destiny. LIVING UNIVERSE captures a pivotal moment in the human story. A film full of insight and inspiration certain to thrill anyone who dreams of distant worlds, or have ever wondered why are we here? Have you ever wondered that someone like you, sitting less than a mile away, in some other universe, exists? The possibility in itself seems frightening as well as astonishing. "From breaking news and intriguing historical documentaries to conspiracy theories, classified NASA files and UFO's. We provide you with material that the government doesn't want you to see." The Insomnia team comes up with a promise. To keep up with the same, the team now brings to us a documentary that aims to change your perspective Of another existence, of another possibility, as today, the scientists now believe there may really be the presence of a parallel universe - and in fact, also believe that there may be an infinite number of parallel universes, and where we live today just happens to be only one of them and many of these other parallel universes come with different laws of physics as well. These other universes that we are talking about not only contain space, time and strange forms of exotic matter but to surprise you, Some of them may even contain you, only maybe in a slightly different form. The thought itself is quite intriguing and scary on the same hand. The basis of this theory is as we know it the idea that parallel universes are constantly spinning off from reality that we humans know of. "Though generally ignored at the time, that theory has gone on to become not just a popular topic of study among respected physicists, but the inspiration for such popular films, television shows, and books as Star Trek and The Golden Compass." according to the sources. The video soon progresses into the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), that is now changing everything, as some say that the remarkable images reveal the true shape of the universe through baby pictures of the same from the time when it was 4 hundred thousand years old, looking so back in time, when there wasn't even the formation of galaxies yet. The WMAP is catching the very first signs of creation as it is officially tagged with measuring radiation that is left over from Big Bang. And now scientists have devised an experiment to find the overall true shape of the universe. The WMAP hence shows that the universe is flat. From here arises the possibility of more mind boggling parallel universe that are of the level-2 type and is made up of giant cosmic soap bubbles that float in hyperspace. Each of these bubbles within it has a whole universe. Now, the question that arises is that - Do we all live in a giant cosmic bubble? Journey to another stars finding lives on other planets
Views: 3393271 ADVEXON TV
News Techcology -  Experts uncover 530-million-year-old trilobite fossil
 
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News Techcology - Experts uncover 530-million-year-old trilobite fossil An 'exceptional' 530-million-year-old fossil contains what could be the oldest eye ever discovered, according to researchers.The remains of the extinct sea creature include an early form of the eye seen in many of today's animals, including crabs, bees and dragonflies.Experts made the find while examining the well-preserved fossil of a hard-shelled species called a trilobite.The right eye of the fossil was partly worn away, giving researchers a clear view inside the organ. This revealed details of the eye's structure and function, and how it differs from modern compound eyes. The species had poor vision compared with many animals today but it could identify predators and obstacles in its path, researchers say. Its eye consists of approximately 100 ommatidia, which are situated relatively far apart compared to contemporary compounds eyes, the team says. Unlike modern compound eyes, the fossil's eye does not have a lens. This is likely because the primitive species - called Schmidtiellus reetae - lacked parts of the shell needed for lens formation.Experts from the University of Edinburgh were among the team that made the discovery on a fossil that was unearthed in Estonia.These ancestors of spiders and crabs lived in coastal waters during the Palaeozoic era, between 541 and 251 million years ago.They found the ancient creature had a primitive form of compound eye, an optical organ that consists of arrays of tiny visual cells, called ommatidia, similar to those of present-day bees.Researchers believe their findings suggest compound eyes have changed little over 500 million years.Professor Euan Clarkson, of the university's school of geosciences, said: 'This exceptional fossil shows us how early animals saw the world around them hundreds of millions of years ago.'Remarkably, it also reveals that the structure and function of compound eyes has barely changed in half a billion years.'The right eye of the fossil was partly worn away, giving researchers a clear view inside the organ.This revealed details of the eye's structure and function, and how it differs from modern compound eyes.The species had poor vision compared with many animals today but it could identify predators and obstacles in its path, researchers say.Its eye consists of approximately 100 ommatidia, which are situated relatively far apart compared to contemporary compounds eyes, the team says.Unlike modern compound eyes, the fossil's eye does not have a lens.This is likely because the primitive species - called Schmidtiellus reetae - lacked parts of the shell needed for lens formation, the team says.Professor Brigitte Schoenemann, of the University of Cologne, who was involved in the study, said: 'This may be the earliest example of an eye that it is possible to find.'Older specimens in sediment layers below this fossil contain only traces of the original animals, which were too soft to be fossilised and have disintegrated over time.'The team also revealed that only a few million years l Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5155559/Experts-uncover-530-million-year-old-trilobite-fossil.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490
The Evolutionary Epic: Crash Course Big History #5
 
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In which John Green, Hank Green, and Emily Graslie teach you about evolution. So, in the last 3.8 billion years, life on Earth has evolved from single-celled prokaryotes to the dizzying array of life we have today. So how did all this happen? We'll talk about Darwin, evolution, natural selection, and how we got from there to here, and from then to now. Learn more here: http://www.bighistoryproject.com
Views: 911967 CrashCourse
Fossils for kids
 
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In this animation video ,kids can learn about formation of fossils and about fossil fuels.The study of fossils is known as paleontology.Thousands of years ago ,when living organisms died, they were buried under land and sea. Pressure of other upper layers that were formed later and with certain chemical reactions, some of the remaining parts of dead organisms changed shape.Watch this lesson for definition and more understanding about fossils.
Views: 335278 makemegenius
What is PALEOZOOLOGY? what does PALEOZOOLOGY mean? PALEOZOOLOGY meaning & explanation
 
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What is PALEOZOOLOGY? what does PALEOZOOLOGY mean? PALEOZOOLOGY meaning - PALEOZOOLOGY definition - PALEOZOOLOGY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Paleozoology is the branch of paleontology, paleobiology, or zoology dealing with the recovery and identification of multicellular animal remains from geological (or even archeological) contexts, and the use of these fossils in the reconstruction of prehistoric environments and ancient ecosystems. Definitive, macroscopic remains of these metazoans are found in the fossil record from the Ediacaran period of the Neoproterozoic era onwards, although they do not become common until the Late Devonian period in the latter half of the Paleozoic era. Perhaps the best known macrofossils group is the dinosaurs. Other popularly known animal-derived macrofossils include trilobites, crustaceans, echinoderms, brachiopods, mollusks, bony fishes, sharks, Vertebrate teeth, and shells of numerous invertebrate groups. This is because hard organic parts, such as bones, teeth, and shells resist decay, and are the most commonly preserved and found animal fossils. Exclusively soft-bodied animals—such as jellyfish, flatworms, nematodes, and insects—are consequently rarely fossilized, as these groups do not produce hard organic parts. Vertebrate paleozoology refers to the use of morphological, temporal, and stratigraphic data to map vertebrate history in evolutionary theory. Vertebrates are classified as a subphylum of Chordata, a phylum used to classify species adhering to a rod-shaped, flexible body type called a notochord. They differ from other phyla in that other phyla may have cartilage or cartilage-like tissues forming a sort of skeleton, but only vertebrates possess what we define as bone. Classes of vertebrates listed in chronological order from oldest to most recent include heterostracans, osteostracans, coelolepid agnathans, acanthodians, osteichthyan fishes, chondrichthyan fishes, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds. All vertebrates are studied under standard evolutionary generalizations of behavior and life process, although there is controversy over whether population can be accurately estimated from limited fossil resources. Evolutionary origins of vertebrates as well as the phylum Chordata have not been scientifically determined. Many believe vertebrates diverged from a common ancestor of chordates and echinoderms. This belief is well supported by the prehistoric marine creature Amphioxus. Amphioxus does not possess bone, making it an invertebrate, but it has common features with vertebrates including a segmented body and a notochord. This could imply that Amphioxus is a transitional form between an early chordate, echinoderm or common ancestor, and vertebrates. Quantitative paleozoology is a process of taking a census of fossil types rather than inventory. They differ in that inventory refers to a detailed log of individual fossils, whereas census attempts to group individual fossils to tally the total number of a species. This information can be used to determine which species were most dominant and which had the largest population at a time period or in a geological region. In the early 1930s, paleontologists Chester Stock and Hildegarde Howard devised special units for quantitative paleozoology and quantitative paleontology. The first unit used, Number of Identified Species (NISP), specified exact quantity of fossils from a specific species recorded. Stock and Howard determined this unit to be problematic for quantitative purposes as an excess of a small fossil—such as teeth—could exaggerate quantity of the species. There was also an amount of confusion as to whether bone fragments should be assembled and counted as one bone or tallied individually.....
Views: 125 The Audiopedia
What is ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE? What does ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE mean? ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE meaning
 
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What is ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE? What does ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE mean? ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE meaning - ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE definition - ECOLOGICAL COLLAPSE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Ecological collapse refers to a situation where an ecosystem suffers a drastic, possibly permanent, reduction in carrying capacity for all organisms, often resulting in mass extinction. Usually, an ecological collapse is precipitated by a disastrous event occurring on a short time scale. Ecosystems have the ability to rebound from a disruptive agent. The difference between collapse or a gentle rebound is determined by two factors—the toxicity of the introduced element and the resiliency of the original ecosystem. Through natural selection the planet's species have continuously adapted to change through variation in their biological composition and distribution. Mathematically it can be demonstrated that greater numbers of different biological factors tend to dampen fluctuations in each of the individual factors. Scientists can predict tipping points for ecological collapse. The most frequently used model for predicting food web collapse is called R50, which is a reliable measurement model for food web robustness. Although, there is no single cause for ecological collapse, attributing factors include asteroid impacts, extremely large volcanic eruptions, and abrupt climate change. The snowball effect of these attributing factors and ecological collapse are demonstrated within the fossil record. Prehistoric examples include the Carboniferous Rainforest Collapse, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, the Permian–Triassic extinction event, and other mass extinctions. For example, effects of climate change as a contributing factor towards ecological collapse are demonstrated in the Ordovician–Silurian extinction events. A possible cause of the Ordovician Extinction was global cooling which affected the habitats of marine life. Consequently, sea creatures such as trilobites, brachiopods, and graptolites became extinct. Furthermore, Karabonov and colleagues conducted a study to show how during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), alternations in the environment and climate led to ecological collapse in Lake Baikal and Lake Hovsgol which then led to species evolution in these systems. The collapse of Hovsgol's ecosystem during the LGM brought forth a new ecosystem, with limited biodiversity in species and low levels of endemism, in Hovsgol during the Holocene. Karabonov's study also shows that ecological collapse during LGM in Lake Hovsgol led to higher levels of diversity and higher levels of endemism as a byproduct of evolution following the ecological collapse of the LGM. The Ordovician Extinction event and Lake Baikal and Hovsgol demonstrate two effects of ecological collapse on prehistoric environments. Historic examples include the collapse of the Grand Banks cod in the early 1990s, attributed to overfishing. Important pressures contributing to current and future ecological collapse include habitat loss, degradation, and fragmentation, overgrazing, overexploitation of ecosystems by humans, human industrial growth and overpopulation, climate change, ocean acidification, pollution, and invasive species.
Views: 148 The Audiopedia
Fossil Fish, Pt. II: A History
 
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Join us for Part II in our quest to uncover the tropical world of ancient Fossil Lake! Palm trees in Wyoming! Sex in the fossil record! Check out "Lost World of Fossil Lake: Snapshots from Deep Time," by Lance Grande bit.ly/1p79CXv Gems and Gemstones: Timeless Natural Beauty of the Mineral World, by Lance Grande: http://bit.ly/1dr59GM Big thanks to The Field Museum's Lance Grande, Jim Holstein, and Akiko Shinya for their assistance in making this video series possible. ---------------------------------------- NEW BLOG! http://isnotadinosaur.tumblr.com Subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/thebrainscoop/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thebrainscoop ---------------------------------------- Producer, Writer, Creator, Host: Emily Graslie Producer, Editor, Camera: Tom McNamara Theme music: Michael Aranda Created By: Hank Green Special Guest: Lance Grande Production Assistant: Katie Kirby ------------------------------------- Filmed on Location and Supported by: The Field Museum in Chicago, IL (http://www.fieldmuseum.org) Thanks to Derek Hennen, Tony Chu, Katerina Idrik, and Seth Bergenholtz who did a -fin-tastic job of subtitling and translating this episode!
Views: 67956 thebrainscoop