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Finding the molecular formula from a mass spectrum
 
17:33
This is the first in a series of 3 lessons about the interpretation of electron impact mass spectra. This video was created for a university course in instrumental analysis in chemistry. Spectra were taken from http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/ and used with permission. The isotope calculator mentioned in the video can be found at http://www.sisweb.com/mstools/isotope.htm
Views: 171984 Gary Mabbott
Mass Spectrometry: Steps to Analyzing a Mass Spec for Molecular Formula
 
09:56
Looks at how to diagram a mass spec to gain the most reliable information concerning finding the molecular weight, major fragments, and the molecular formula. Fully worked example included.
8 1 Finding the molecular formula from a mass spectrum Link2
 
17:34
HEJ's recommended video lectures Compendium of Mass Spectrometry
Calculation of Molecular Mass Using Mass Spectroscopy
 
09:21
Mass Spectroscopy gives the mass to charge (m/z) ration of a Compound. We can calculate molecular mass as well as structure of the compound. Molecular mass can be calculated using formula: M= Z(m/z-1)
Mass spectrometry part 1 : introduction
 
24:09
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 256148 Shomu's Biology
Mass spectrometry part 5: Graph analysis
 
17:40
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 45857 Shomu's Biology
LIGHT SCATTERING METHOD TO DETERMINE MOLECULAR WEIGHT OF POLYMER
 
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LIGHT SCATTERING METHOD IS ONE OF THE SIMPLEST METHOD TO DETERMINE THE MOLECULAR WEIGHT OF POLYMER.... PLEASE LIKE AND SHARE.....
Views: 12269 Advanced Chemistry
Mass Spectrometry: Identifying the Molecular Ion
 
08:56
Looks at the definition of the molecular ion and how to find it in a mass spectrum. Looks at Carbon, Chlorine, and Bromine isotope effects, the nitrogen rule, as well as what to do when the molecular ion doesn't show up.
How2: Interpret a mass spectrum
 
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Shows you how to get the information out of a mass spectrum and use it to help suggest the identity of an unidentified molecule
Views: 294325 Andrew Crookell
Mass Spectrometry
 
04:51
Who wants to smash molecules into little bits? A mass spectrometer does, that's who. This is a good technique for corroborating molecular structure, because we can make sure the puzzle pieces fit the right way. Check it out! To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 162576 Professor Dave Explains
Calculating Relative Atomic Mass from Mass Spectra
 
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A look at how the relative atomic mass can be calculated from Mass Spectra. 2 examples are given that commonly appear in A Level Chemistry exams.
Views: 46361 Allery Chemistry
Mass Spectroscopy - Identify Molecular Structure CxHyO2 001
 
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Identify a reasonable structure for the pictured mass spectrum of an unknown sample, CxHyO2. ———————————— INTERVIEW 1) Revell, K. (November 16, 2016) “An Interview with Heath Giesbrecht, Part I” The Macmillan Community https://community.macmillan.com/groups/flipped-chemistry/blog/2016/11/17/an-interview-with-heath-giesbrecht-part-1 2) Revell, K. (November 16, 2016) “An Interview with Heath Giesbrecht, Part II” The Macmillan Community https://community.macmillan.com/groups/flipped-chemistry/blog/2016/11/17/an-interview-with-heath-giesbrecht-part-2 ———————————— INTERDISCIPLINARY ART LECTURE: 1) Giesbrecht, H., Peet, K. (January 20, 2016) “Translating Failure” WEDGE_SPACE https://vimeo.com/152432030 ———————————— FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/profheath/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/prof_heath
Mass Spectrometry Organic Compounds
 
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Description of how mass spectra of organic compounds are used to determine the Mr and how fragment peaks enable the analytical chemist to build up a picture of the molecule
Views: 19670 MaChemGuy
SEDIMENTATION OR ULTRACENTRIFUGATION METHOD TO DETERMINE MOLECULAR WEIGHT OF POLYMER
 
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SEDIMENTATION VELOCITY AND SEDIMENTATION EQUILIBRIUM ARE TWO METHODS CLASSIFIED UNDER ULTRACENTRIFUGATION METHOD TO DETERMINE MOLECULAR WEIGHT PLEASE LIKE SHARE AND SUPPORT
Views: 7379 Advanced Chemistry
Solving an Unknown Organic Structure using NMR, IR, and MS
 
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In this lesson we learn the steps of solving for an unknown compound when presented with several spectra including mass spectroscopy, IR, proton NMR, and carbon 13 NMR. Support the Channel! Buy The Complete Solving Unknown Spectroscopy Guide Here: https://www.chemcomplete.com/buy-guides Visit us Online: https://www.chemcomplete.com/ Private 1 on 1 Coaching Available, Custom Video Lessons! Learn with us online! https://www.udemy.com/user/matthew-tomney Follow us on social media: https://twitter.com/ChemComplete https://www.facebook.com/chemcomplete
Views: 24299 ChemComplete
Mass Spectrometry part 2  Calculations
 
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Calculating atomic weight from isotope mass and relative abundance.
Views: 93 Arnoldscience
Mass Spectrometry - Fragmentation
 
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See more videos at: http://talkboard.com.au/ In this video, we look at the idea of fragmentation in mass spectrometry. We examine how fragmentation can occur repeatedly with a given substance, and how it helps us to breakdown the structure of a molecule.
Views: 130210 talkboard.com.au
8-1 Finding the molecular formula from a mass spectrum Link1
 
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HEJ's recommended video lectures Compendium of Mass Spectrometry
Molecular weight calculation | molecular weight formula
 
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This protein chemistry lecture explains about Molecular weight calculation. molecular weight and molecular mass problems calculations for CSIR UGC NET JRF. http://www.shomusbiology.com/ Get Shomu's Biology DVD set here- http://www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.com/bio-materials.html Remember Shomu’s Biology is created to spread the knowledge of life science and biology by sharing all this free biology lectures video and animation presented by Suman Bhattacharjee in YouTube. All these tutorials are brought to you for free. Please subscribe to our channel so that we can grow together. You can check for any of the following services from Shomu’s Biology- Buy Shomu’s Biology lecture DVD set- www.shomusbiology.com/dvd-store Shomu’s Biology assignment services – www.shomusbiology.com/assignment -help Join Online coaching for CSIR NET exam – www.shomusbiology.com/net-coaching We are social. Find us on different sites here- Our Website – www.shomusbiology.com Facebook page- https://www.facebook.com/ShomusBiology/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/shomusbiology SlideShare- www.slideshare.net/shomusbiology Google plus- https://plus.google.com/113648584982732129198 LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/suman-bhattacharjee-2a051661 Youtube- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheFunsuman Thank you for watching
Views: 17532 Shomu's Biology
Mass spectrometry part 3 : protein analysis (step by step process)
 
35:56
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 74143 Shomu's Biology
Determine Organic Structure from IR/NMR/C NMR/ Mass Spectroscopy Part 4
 
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CHECK OUT THE FIRST PRACTICE PROBLEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j21CAxsU30U CHECK OUT THE THIRD PRACTICE PROBLEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUiRt... CHECK OUT SECOND PRACTICE PROBLEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Nrz_... Have you subscribed? it is free :) In this video, I will do a full walk-through for a typical organic exam question, how to derive organic structure from spectroscopic data given such as H NMR, C NMR, IR spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Due to popular demand, I've uploaded the part 2 of this series. I hope you guys find this video beneficial. Part 3 is coming up as well. How to interpret C NMR? How to interpret H NMR? What is proton NMR? What is carbon NMR? Practice problem H NMR/ C NMR How to identify organic structure from H NMR How to identify organic structure from C NMR How to identify organic structure from Carbon NMR How to identify organic structure from proton NMR How to identify organic structure from Mass spectroscopy How to identify organic structure from IR spectroscopy H NMR practice problem C NMR practice problem IR spectroscopy practice problem Mass spectroscopy practice problem Determine organic structure from IR Determine organic structure from NMR Determine organic structure from C NMR Determine organic structure from Mass spectroscopy
Views: 6487 Hamed Hosseini
Mass spectrometry
 
14:48
Tutorials, practice problems and more at https://organicchemexplained.com How do you measure the molecular mass of a molecule? What is a mass spectrometer and how does it work? What is the Index of Hydrogen Deficiency (IHD) and how do you calculate it? How can mass spectrometry be used to determine the molecular formula for a molecule with unknown structure? Study Guides / Flash Cards: https://quizlet.com/features/OrganicChemExplained Blog: https://organicchemexplained.com Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/organicchemexplained/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarkCoster_Chem LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/markjcoster/
Mass spectrometry part 4 : Graph features and analysis
 
17:45
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 64775 Shomu's Biology
Empirical Formula & Molecular Formula Determination From Percent Composition
 
11:00
This chemistry video tutorial explains how to find the empirical formula given the mass in grams or from the percent composition of each element in a compound. If you're given the mass percent, you can simply treat it as if you were given the mass in grams. This video explains how to find the molecular formula given the molar mass of the compound. You can do this once you have the empirical formula. This video explains all of it. It has plenty of practice problems and examples for you to master this lesson. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Mass spectrum of diatomic molecules
 
02:10
Determine the number of peaks in a mass spectrum of elements that form diatomic molecules
Views: 1805 WinScience
Mass spectrometry part 2 : instrumentation (mass spectrometer)
 
21:20
For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique that produces spectra (singular spectrum) of the masses of the molecules comprising a sample of material. The spectra are used to determine the elemental composition of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. Mass spectrometry works by ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measuring their mass-to-charge ratios.[1] In a typical MS procedure, a sample, which may be solid, liquid, or gas, is ionized. The ions are separated according to their mass-to-charge ratio.[1] The ions are detected by a mechanism capable of detecting charged particles. Signal processing results are displayed as spectra of the relative abundance of ions as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. The atoms or molecules can be identified by correlating known masses to the identified masses or through a characteristic fragmentation pattern. A mass spectrometer consists of three components: an ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector.[2] The ionizer converts a portion of the sample into ions. There is a wide variety of ionization techniques, depending on the phase (solid, liquid, gas) of the sample and the efficiency of various ionization mechanisms for the unknown species. An extraction system removes ions from the sample, which are then trajected through the mass analyzer and onto the detector. The differences in masses of the fragments allows the mass analyzer to sort the ions by their mass-to-charge ratio. The detector measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. Some detectors also give spatial information, e.g. a multichannel plate. Mass spectrometry has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds. As an analytical technique it possesses distinct advantages such as: 1. Increased sensitivity over most other analytical techniques because the analyzer, as a mass-charge filter, reduces background interference 2. Excellent specificity from characteristic fragmentation patterns to identify unknowns or confirm the presence of suspected compounds. 3. Information about molecular weight. 4. Information about the isotopic abundance of elements. 5. Temporally resolved chemical data. A few of the disadvantages of the method is that often fails to distinguish between optical and geometrical isomers and the positions of substituent in o-, m- and p- positions in an aromatic ring. Also, its scope is limited in identifying hydrocarbons that produce similar fragmented ions.[3] Source of the article published in description is Wikipedia. I am sharing their material. Copyright by original content developers of Wikipedia. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
Views: 98893 Shomu's Biology
11.3 Determine the molecular mass of a compound from the molecular ion peak [SL IB Chemistry]
 
02:24
When a molecule goes through a mass spectrometer it will have an electron knocked off and MAY also then be fragmented (snipped in two). If only the electron is removed then a molecular ion (M+) is produced. This will have the highest m/z value on the mass spectrum AND it will also have the same molar mass as the molecule (heck you only removed 1 electron). This of course only works if the charge on the ion (z) is always +1. Luckily the IB assumes it is. Dr Atkinson has ordered a proton gun in the mail to reduce his static cling -- I am worried that he may not drop the charges!
Views: 31958 Richard Thornley
Mass Spectrometry
 
08:20
009 - Mass Spectrometry In this video Paul Andersen explains how a spectrometer was used to identify the presence of isotopes. This modified Dalton's original atomic theory because atoms of the same element had different masses. The functional parts of a mass spectrometer are detailed including the ionizer, mass analyzer and the detector. A simulation of Chlorine isotopes along with an average atomic mass calculation is included. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:John Dalton by Charles Turner.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 2, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_Dalton_by_Charles_Turner.jpg. "File:Myoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 5, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. "File:Peptide-Figure-Revised.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 5, 2013. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Peptide-Figure-Revised.png. File:WidmoMS.gif, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WidmoMS.gif.
Views: 279755 Bozeman Science
Introduction to Combustion Analysis, Empirical Formula & Molecular Formula Problems
 
16:49
This chemistry video tutorial explains how to find the empirical formula and molecular formula using combustion analysis. It explains how to calculate the number of moles of each element given the mass in grams of CO2 and H2O. Examples include compounds containing Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen. This video contains plenty of practice problems New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Mod-01 Lec-32 Determination of Molecular Weight of Polymers (Contd.)
 
58:59
Polymer Chemistry by Dr. D. Dhara,Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 8652 nptelhrd
13.04 Isotopic Abundance in Mass Spectrometry
 
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Effects of isotopic abundance on molecular ion peaks in mass spectra of samples containing chlorine or bromine.
Views: 1579 Michael Evans
Given the NMR Spectrum, Draw the Structure of this Molecule
 
06:34
Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 51435 chemistNATE
First year Chemistry, Ch 1 - Determination of Relative Atomic - FSc Chemistry part 1
 
12:15
In this online lecture, Sir Khurram Shehzad explains 1st year Chemistry book 1 Chapter 1 Basic Concepts.The topic being discussed is Topic 1.3.2 Determination of Relative Atomic. punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board inter part 1 Chemistry book 1 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for Pre Medical / Engineering 11th class for Chemistry chapter 1 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Khurram Shehzad visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/11th-class-chemistry/basic-concepts.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on Mathematics inter part 1 ch. 1, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/11th-class/chemistry/basic-concepts
Views: 25763 ilmkidunya
How to Calculate a Molecular Mass of a Protein
 
06:54
The dalton, symbol Da, is also sometimes used as a unit of molar mass, especially in biochemistry, with the definition 1 Da = 1 g/mol, despite the fact that it is strictly a unit of mass (1 Da = 1 u = 1.660 538 921(73)×10−27 kg).
Atomic Mass: How to Calculate Isotope Abundance
 
11:49
To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How do you determine and calculate isotope abundance when you know the relative atomic mass (also known as atomic weight), as measured in amu or atomic mass numbers? Here we will go through the algebra and reasoning to figure out the amount of abundances of the isotopes, in percentages and in decimals.
Views: 355760 Tyler DeWitt
Mass Spectrometry
 
09:27
This video is about Mass Spectrometry of A-level chemistry. From this video, the candidates can learn easily the mass spectrometry.
Views: 25 Catalyst Education
Atomic Mass and Mass Spectrum
 
08:59
In this video I will show you how to obtain the atomic mass of an element when the isotopic forms of it are given, as well as show you how to graph the mass spectrum given the abundance of those isotopes. Support us!: https://www.patreon.com/learningsimply Twitter: https://twitter.com/learningsimplyv
Views: 611 Learning Simply
Mass Spectrometry - Isotopes
 
15:28
See more videos at: http://talkboard.com.au/ In this video, we look at how different isotopes show up on a mass spectrum, and how our knowledge of the isotopes of an element thereby helps us thoroughly understand a molecule's structure.
Views: 6436 talkboard.com.au
Chem 203. Organic Spectroscopy. Lecture 04. Mass Spectrometry.
 
55:22
UCI Chem 203 Organic Spectroscopy (Fall 2011) Lec 04. Organic Spectroscopy -- Mass Spectroscopy -- Theory, Instrumentation, and Techniques. View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_203_organic_spectroscopy.html Instructor: James Nowick, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: This is a graduate course in organic spectroscopy, focusing on modern methods used in structure determination of organic molecules. Topics include mass spectrometry; ultraviolet, chiroptical, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Organic Spectroscopy (Chem 203) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 28-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Spectroscopy" taught at UC Irvine by Professor James Nowick. Recorded September 30, 2011. Required attribution: Nowick, James S. Organic Spectroscopy 203 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_203_organic_spectroscopy.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 3802 UCI Open
Practice Problem: Assigning Molecular Structure From an NMR Spectrum
 
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For this one we need to be able to interpret NMR data in order to arrive at the correct molecular structure based on an empirical formula. It's not as hard as it sounds! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Determining Molar Mass of Acid through Titration
 
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This video covers titrations of acids with the purpose of determining the molar mass of the acid.
Views: 16072 Amy Hammer
Mod-01 Lec-31 Determination of Molecular Weight of Polymers (Contd.)
 
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Polymer Chemistry by Dr. D. Dhara,Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 16170 nptelhrd
Ep16 Osmotic pressure, light scattering, MALDI-TOF-MS - NANO 134 Darren Lipomi
 
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A very brief overview of methods used to determine Mn and Mw. CORRECTION: at 28:00, "Kc" is the optical constant K times the concentration c. That is, "c" is not a subscript; at 29:20, I should have written just "K" not "Kc". Thanks! http://group.darrenlipomi.com
Views: 1277 Darren Lipomi
Relative molecular masses of gases
 
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You can find instructions for this experiment at http://www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry/resource/res00000832/determining-relative-molecular-masses-by-weighing-gases In this experiment known volumes of different gases are weighed in a gas syringe and their relative molecular masses are determined using the ideal gas equation.
Fundamentals of MS (7 of 7) - Fragmentation
 
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Nick Tomczyk at Waters Corporation explains how molecules break apart in a mass spectrometer, and how we can use fragmentation spectra to help us identify unknown compounds or increase confidence in identification of compounds when screening.
Views: 2854 Waters Corporation
How to calculate the Molar Mass / Molecular Weight of Br2 : Bromine gas
 
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Explanation of how to find the molar mass of Br2: Bromine gas. A few things to consider when finding the molar mass for Br2: - make sure you have the correct chemical formula. - always include the units for molecular weight (grams/mole). - make sure you do the math right - follow the order of operations. Watch: Molar Mass in Three Easy Steps: https://youtu.be/o3MMBO8WxjY Note that molecular weight, molar mass, and gram formula mass are all the same thing. Periodic Table Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Periodic-table.jpg Finding the Molar Mass / Molecular Weight of a compound is a essential skill for the chemistry topic of stoichiometry and the first step in converting from moles to grams (or grams to moles).
Views: 1093 Wayne Breslyn