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Pet care - How to Care Your Dog in Delivery Day's  - Bhola Shola
 
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Pet Care - how to Care Your Dog in Delivery Day's Find more at http://www.bholashola.com Also, Like our facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/bholashola Pet Care is a pet awareness initiative by Harwinder Grewal. Who is an owner of Grewal Pet Shop and Farm, Main Road, Adampur. In this video, he tells about how to Care Your Dog in Delivery Day's in the Hindi Language. 1. Properly caring for a pregnant dog is essential to a successful breeding process. Thorough care throughout gestation, which can be from 55 to 72 days, as well as proper preparation for delivery are key. Before your dog delivers her pups, she needs a nice, clean, and quiet atmosphere, a proper diet and exercise routine, and proper veterinary care. In no time, you'll be all set up for delivering and raising brand new pups! 2. Many canine diseases can pass from a mother dog to her puppies. Have your veterinarian examine your dog before you breed her to minimize the risk of passing a genetic disease to the puppies. Heritable diseases can affect the bones, joints, heart, teeth, skin, blood cells, kidneys, liver, nervous system (brain and spinal cord), digestive tract, reproductive organs, and the immune system. Some common examples include hip dysplasia, allergies, cryptorchidism, and hernias. 3. If your dog’s pregnancy is planned, take her to the veterinarian for a check-up before breeding her. Bring her in again about 30 days into the pregnancy.[1] If the pregnancy wasn’t planned, take her to the vet as soon as you find out she’s pregnant. 4. If you plan to breed your dog, it’s recommended that you wait until she’s at least 24 months old. By that point she will be mature enough for any relevant medical problems to become apparent. 5. Some dog breeds may be prone to genetic conditions like dental problems, dislocating patellas, hip dysplasia, spine problems, allergies, heart conditions, and/or behavioral problems. It’s important to be aware of these conditions before breeding your dog. 6. Unless directly instructed by your vet, you should not give your dog medications unsafe for pregnancy. You also shouldn’t have her vaccinated. 7. Your dog should have been vaccinated before she became pregnant so she can pass the antibodies on to her pups. But if not, don’t vaccinate her while pregnant, as some vaccines can be harmful to developing fetuses. 8. If using flea control, be sure to use a product that’s safe for use on pregnant dogs. 9. Do make sure that your dog is on a deworming program. An untreated mother can pass on roundworms, hookworms, or heart worms to her puppies. 10. The average gestation period for a dog is between 58 and 68 days. Try to accurately pinpoint when conception occurred so you can anticipate labor accordingly. 1. By 45 days into the pregnancy, your vet can use x-rays to detect the number of puppies in the litter. 2. You may also notice nesting behavior and a tendency to want to withdraw or retreat; this is normal and to be expected. Thanks for watching our video. Please like this video if you liked it. Also, subscribe to our channel here: https://www.youtube.com/BholaShola -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Our Collaboration with Doggies Squad" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQbs6FKkxiA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 21662 Bhola Shola
Dogs 101 - POMERANIAN - Top Dog Facts About the POMERANIAN
 
03:53
Dogs 101 - POMERANIAN - Top Dog Facts About the POMERANIAN Check out More at BrooklynsCorner.com The Pomeranian, belonging to the Spitz family, is one of the most popular toy dog breeds in the world. The breed’s ancestors were sled dogs common in the Arctic region for long. One of the breeds descended from these tough dogs was the German Spitz, which was bred for smaller size in the Pomerania region, in modern-day Germany and Poland. From here, the smaller dog was taken to England around the mid-1700s, where it was first called the Pomeranian. These dogs were still larger in size compared to the modern Pomeranian, and were almost always white or grey in color. Queen Charlotte, the queen-consort of King Edward III, and Queen Victoria, helped make the breed popular in England. Queen Victoria also encouraged a systematic breeding program that focused on developing smaller dogs of a wider range of colors. The first breed standard was written in England towards the end of the 1800s. The Pomeranian came to the US around the same time, and has remained popular as a pet and as a show dog. Time for some Ruff Trivia: - The Pomeranian is known as the Zwergspitz in some countries. What does ‘Zwerg’ mean? o A: Happy o B: Dwarf o C: Home What do you think, give it your best guess in the comments below before we get to the answer! Hang on tight and we’ll get back to this Ruff Trivia Question toward the end of the video. The height of an adult Pomeranian is typically between 8 to 11 inches, and weight between 3 and 7 pounds. It has a thick, double coat, with a short dense undercoat and a profuse, harsh, long outer coat. The heavily plumed tail is set high and lies flat on the back. The most common colors are orange, black, cream or white, with less common colors being brown, red, blue, sable, tan, spotted, brindle, or combinations of any of these colors. Its ears are small; gait is smooth; and expression is alert and foxlike. Grooming: Daily brushing is recommended to keep the Pomeranian’s thick coat clean and without matting, as well as to minimize shedding. Many owners prefer to trim the coat every 1 to 2 months. Regular brushing of teeth, trimming of nails and cleaning of ears are needed. Environment: A Pomeranian is an extrovert by nature, loves being the center of attention and makes for an excellent family pet. It is very friendly with family members, loves to curl up in the lap of a grown up and is good with kids. It can get aggressive with other dogs and also tends to be very defensive when faced with new sounds or people. It is one of the more vocal breeds, particularly if not trained to stand down when instructed by the owner. Training: The Pomeranian is known to be an intelligent dog that can be trained easily. Because of its small size, its exercise needs are easily met by moving around inside the house, or a moderate walk. Health: The life expectancy of a Pomeranian is 12 to 16 years. Kneecap dislocation, tracheal collapse and severe hair loss are some common ailments. Cryptorchidism, a disorder in which one or both testicles do not descend, is a common issue, which can be easily treated through minor surgery. Merle-colored Pomeranians are prone to some additional genetic problems like deafness, ametropia, micropthalmia and colobomas. An outgoing, high-energy dog, the Pomeranian is perfect for a small apartment. It is very intelligent and eager to learn, and if you can give it some daily time for training and play, it will keep you company and entertain you with its antics too. Find out if the Pomeranian would be a good addition to your home. Now you can visit Brooklyn’s Corner.com to take our quiz and find out which dog would be the best match for you. Music by Kevin McLeod - Royalty Free
Views: 35970 Brooklyns Corner
AMERICAN BULLDOG PUPPIES FOR SALE – GRAND FUTURE TRIUMPH X URBAN’S ELI OF TOUGH ENOUGH
 
05:17
American Bulldog Puppies at 1 month old. Grand Future Honey Grand Future Happy Grand Future Heartbreaker Grand Future Hero Grand Future Hooligan American Bulldog breeder since 2000, Grand Future Kennel, based in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Los Angeles, California, is home to 13 Grand Champions and 35 Champions spanning 9 countries. We specialize in Bully-type, also sometimes referred to as Johnson American Bulldogs. However on occasion we do produce fantastic standard- and hybrid-type American Bulldogs. Dogs produced by our American Bulldog kennel have been successfully trained and certified in defense and obedience. We breed for functional and balanced temperament allowing for the American Bulldog to be a family member and a companion while having the drive and intelligence to perform desired functions. At Grand Future, we typically produce large American Bulldogs. Males range in 100-130 lbs and females range in 90-120 lbs. Grand Future Kennel is registered under FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale) and NKC (National Kennel Club). We have always bred to a significantly stricter breed standard than the current American Bulldog breed standards under U.S.-based registries. Dogs with the following characteristics are not shown at conformation shows nor bred in our kennel: 1. Full black mask – this genetic trait is usually a result of another breed having been infused into the gene pool. 2. Kinked tail – this is considered to be a genetic defect of the spine and it may adversely affect the given dog’s offspring’s health. Usually a dog with a kinked tail itself is not at risk of health complications as a result of the kinked tail. 3. Blue eye(s) – a genetic mutation with possible health consequences and/or a genetic trait that is a result of another breed having been infused. 4. Coat colors other than white, white/brindle, or white/red – any colors beside these is usually a sure sign that another breed was infused into the gene pool. 5. Teeth – dogs missing more than 3 teeth. 6. Lack of skin pigmentation – pigment affects the overall health / immune system of the dog. Dogs lacking full pigmentation are more susceptible to various health problems. Lack of pigment is also responsible for deafness in dogs. We have never produced a deaf dog. We are proud of the dogs we produce. We have many repeat buyers – over 30 families have purchased 2,3,4, and even 5 dogs. Our dogs generally love children and have balanced temperament. We have always worked with diligence to improve our line of American Bulldogs. Having produced over 600 dogs in 7 generations, we have history and data that allows us to make some conclusions that we believe are significant. 1. The very common problem of hip dysplasia that afflicts this breed is nearly non-existent in our kennel. 2. Our dogs tend to have normal locomotion – good movement due to anatomically sound physical structure. 3. Our dogs have never torn ligaments, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 4. Our dogs have never prematurely died from heart problems, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 5. Our dogs tend to breathe well. 6. Our dogs tend to live long. 7. Our dogs have never been afflicted with cancer at a young age. The earliest instance of cancer has been encountered at 8 years of age by one dog. The remainder of cases have been documented at over 10 years of age. We don’t cut corners. The biggest tragedy for an owner is in having to care for a sick dog as a result of poor breeding, and be absolutely helpless as that dog passes in their arms. Exorbitant medical bills end up being paid to prolong the time together even by just a little with the beloved family member. As with any animal breeding program, our kennel is not immune from problems. The owners’ happiness with our dogs is paramount to us. We resolve any occasional problems that do arise to the owner’s satisfaction because we take pride in what we do, and we do it really well. Hearing the “Thank you!”s from owners of our dogs after years or even a lifetime is the greatest gift of all. This drives us to continually improve. We maintain contact and help our owners in any way we can; even at 4AM or during a vacation since we have owners all over the world in various timezones. Our breeding expertise enables us to deliver healthy, beautiful, strong, and intelligent American Bulldog puppies. We provide a contractual health guarantee against the following genetic health problems – Degenerative joint disease, hip dysplasia, knees, elbows, cataracts, entropion, ectropion, heart, kidneys, thyroid, epilepsy, ichthyosis, generalized demodex, cryptorchidism and any neurological disorders including NCL. All puppies in this litter are sold. For more photos, videos, and general information visit - http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/
Views: 680 Grand Future Kennel
AMERICAN BULLDOG PUPPIES FOR SALE – GRAND FUTURE TRIUMPH X URBAN’S ELI OF TOUGH ENOUGH
 
01:27
American Bulldog breeder since 2000, Grand Future Kennel, based in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Los Angeles, California, is home to 13 Grand Champions and 35 Champions spanning 9 countries. We specialize in Bully-type, also sometimes referred to as Johnson American Bulldogs. However on occasion we do produce fantastic standard- and hybrid-type American Bulldogs. Dogs produced by our American Bulldog kennel have been successfully trained and certified in defense and obedience. We breed for functional and balanced temperament allowing for the American Bulldog to be a family member and a companion while having the drive and intelligence to perform desired functions. At Grand Future, we typically produce large American Bulldogs. Males range in 100-130 lbs and females range in 90-120 lbs. Grand Future Kennel is registered under FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale) and NKC (National Kennel Club). We have always bred to a significantly stricter breed standard than the current American Bulldog breed standards under U.S.-based registries. Dogs with the following characteristics are not shown at conformation shows nor bred in our kennel: 1. Full black mask – this genetic trait is usually a result of another breed having been infused into the gene pool. 2. Kinked tail – this is considered to be a genetic defect of the spine and it may adversely affect the given dog’s offspring’s health. Usually a dog with a kinked tail itself is not at risk of health complications as a result of the kinked tail. 3. Blue eye(s) – a genetic mutation with possible health consequences and/or a genetic trait that is a result of another breed having been infused. 4. Coat colors other than white, white/brindle, or white/red – any colors beside these is usually a sure sign that another breed was infused into the gene pool. 5. Teeth – dogs missing more than 3 teeth. 6. Lack of skin pigmentation – pigment affects the overall health / immune system of the dog. Dogs lacking full pigmentation are more susceptible to various health problems. Lack of pigment is also responsible for deafness in dogs. We have never produced a deaf dog. We are proud of the dogs we produce. We have many repeat buyers – over 30 families have purchased 2,3,4, and even 5 dogs. Our dogs generally love children and have balanced temperament. We have always worked with diligence to improve our line of American Bulldogs. Having produced over 600 dogs in 7 generations, we have history and data that allows us to make some conclusions that we believe are significant. 1. The very common problem of hip dysplasia that afflicts this breed is nearly non-existent in our kennel. 2. Our dogs tend to have normal locomotion – good movement due to anatomically sound physical structure. 3. Our dogs have never torn ligaments, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 4. Our dogs have never prematurely died from heart problems, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 5. Our dogs tend to breathe well. 6. Our dogs tend to live long. 7. Our dogs have never been afflicted with cancer at a young age. The earliest instance of cancer has been encountered at 8 years of age by one dog. The remainder of cases have been documented at over 10 years of age. We don’t cut corners. The biggest tragedy for an owner is in having to care for a sick dog as a result of poor breeding, and be absolutely helpless as that dog passes in their arms. Exorbitant medical bills end up being paid to prolong the time together even by just a little with the beloved family member. As with any animal breeding program, our kennel is not immune from problems. The owners’ happiness with our dogs is paramount to us. We resolve any occasional problems that do arise to the owner’s satisfaction because we take pride in what we do, and we do it really well. Hearing the “Thank you!”s from owners of our dogs after years or even a lifetime is the greatest gift of all. This drives us to continually improve. We maintain contact and help our owners in any way we can; even at 4AM or during a vacation since we have owners all over the world in various timezones. Our breeding expertise enables us to deliver healthy, beautiful, strong, and intelligent American Bulldog puppies. We provide a contractual health guarantee against the following genetic health problems – Degenerative joint disease, hip dysplasia, knees, elbows, cataracts, entropion, ectropion, heart, kidneys, thyroid, epilepsy, ichthyosis, generalized demodex, cryptorchidism and any neurological disorders including NCL. All puppies in this litter are sold. For more photos, videos, and general information visit - http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/
Views: 191 Grand Future Kennel
AMERICAN BULLDOG PUPPIES FOR SALE – GRAND FUTURE TRIUMPH X URBAN’S ELI OF TOUGH ENOUGH
 
02:39
American Bulldog Puppies at 7 weeks old. All puppies in this litter were sold prior to birth. Grand Future Honey Grand Future Happy Grand Future Heartbreaker Grand Future Hero Grand Future Hooligan American Bulldog breeder since 2000, Grand Future Kennel, based in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Los Angeles, California, is home to 13 Grand Champions and 35 Champions spanning 9 countries. We specialize in Bully-type, also sometimes referred to as Johnson American Bulldogs. However on occasion we do produce fantastic standard- and hybrid-type American Bulldogs. Dogs produced by our American Bulldog kennel have been successfully trained and certified in defense and obedience. We breed for functional and balanced temperament allowing for the American Bulldog to be a family member and a companion while having the drive and intelligence to perform desired functions. At Grand Future, we typically produce large American Bulldogs. Males range in 100-130 lbs and females range in 90-120 lbs. Grand Future Kennel is registered under FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale) and NKC (National Kennel Club). We have always bred to a significantly stricter breed standard than the current American Bulldog breed standards under U.S.-based registries. Dogs with the following characteristics are not shown at conformation shows nor bred in our kennel: 1. Full black mask – this genetic trait is usually a result of another breed having been infused into the gene pool. 2. Kinked tail – this is considered to be a genetic defect of the spine and it may adversely affect the given dog’s offspring’s health. Usually a dog with a kinked tail itself is not at risk of health complications as a result of the kinked tail. 3. Blue eye(s) – a genetic mutation with possible health consequences and/or a genetic trait that is a result of another breed having been infused. 4. Coat colors other than white, white/brindle, or white/red – any colors beside these is usually a sure sign that another breed was infused into the gene pool. 5. Teeth – dogs missing more than 3 teeth. 6. Lack of skin pigmentation – pigment affects the overall health / immune system of the dog. Dogs lacking full pigmentation are more susceptible to various health problems. Lack of pigment is also responsible for deafness in dogs. We have never produced a deaf dog. We are proud of the dogs we produce. We have many repeat buyers – over 30 families have purchased 2,3,4, and even 5 dogs. Our dogs generally love children and have balanced temperament. We have always worked with diligence to improve our line of American Bulldogs. Having produced over 600 dogs in 7 generations, we have history and data that allows us to make some conclusions that we believe are significant. 1. The very common problem of hip dysplasia that afflicts this breed is nearly non-existent in our kennel. 2. Our dogs tend to have normal locomotion – good movement due to anatomically sound physical structure. 3. Our dogs have never torn ligaments, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 4. Our dogs have never prematurely died from heart problems, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 5. Our dogs tend to breathe well. 6. Our dogs tend to live long. 7. Our dogs have never been afflicted with cancer at a young age. The earliest instance of cancer has been encountered at 8 years of age by one dog. The remainder of cases have been documented at over 10 years of age. We don’t cut corners. The biggest tragedy for an owner is in having to care for a sick dog as a result of poor breeding, and be absolutely helpless as that dog passes in their arms. Exorbitant medical bills end up being paid to prolong the time together even by just a little with the beloved family member. As with any animal breeding program, our kennel is not immune from problems. The owners’ happiness with our dogs is paramount to us. We resolve any occasional problems that do arise to the owner’s satisfaction because we take pride in what we do, and we do it really well. Hearing the “Thank you!”s from owners of our dogs after years or even a lifetime is the greatest gift of all. This drives us to continually improve. We maintain contact and help our owners in any way we can; even at 4AM or during a vacation since we have owners all over the world in various timezones. Our breeding expertise enables us to deliver healthy, beautiful, strong, and intelligent American Bulldog puppies. We provide a contractual health guarantee against the following genetic health problems – Degenerative joint disease, hip dysplasia, knees, elbows, cataracts, entropion, ectropion, heart, kidneys, thyroid, epilepsy, ichthyosis, generalized demodex, cryptorchidism and any neurological disorders including NCL. For more photos, videos, and general information visit - http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/ Music by Robbie Williams - Party Like a Russian
Views: 139 Igor Sushko
How to treat Undescended testicles in cats
 
01:07
Kitten sergeant Wilson how to treat Undescended testicles in cats-cryptorchidism is the medical term. It can result from in breeding or be genetic. Kitty will have to wait a while longer before he has his operation to neuter him. The testes are in body still behind the kidneys and minuscule small so it's best to wait and see if they grow a little bigger so easier to remove. It's likely that the testes will not descend down into the sacs. The problem can cause cancer or future problems so it's best to have them out. Esthersuz is from a writers family and has always loved to write! BLUE IN THE TOOTH - with a colour therapy twist -a colourful fun book about a rotten tooth called Blue and how he copes! Educational and colour therapy colours. AUNTIE BERTIE AND THE FLYING CIRCUS MOUSE! -with a colour therapy twist! AMAZON-BUY CLICK THE LINK BELOW FOR BLUE IN THE TOOTH-with a colour therapy twist by Esther Loftus Gough https://www.amazon.com/author/estherloftusgough SUBSCRIBE ENJOY ! INSTAGRAM https://instagram.com/esthersuz/ TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/Esthersuz GOOGLE +
AMERICAN BULLDOG PUPPIES FOR SALE – GRAND FUTURE TRIUMPH X URBAN’S ELI OF TOUGH ENOUGH
 
04:15
American Bulldog Puppies at 1 month old. Grand Future Honey Grand Future Happy Grand Future Heartbreaker Grand Future Hero Grand Future Hooligan American Bulldog breeder since 2000, Grand Future Kennel, based in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Los Angeles, California, is home to 13 Grand Champions and 35 Champions spanning 9 countries. We specialize in Bully-type, also sometimes referred to as Johnson American Bulldogs. However on occasion we do produce fantastic standard- and hybrid-type American Bulldogs. Dogs produced by our American Bulldog kennel have been successfully trained and certified in defense and obedience. We breed for functional and balanced temperament allowing for the American Bulldog to be a family member and a companion while having the drive and intelligence to perform desired functions. At Grand Future, we typically produce large American Bulldogs. Males range in 100-130 lbs and females range in 90-120 lbs. Grand Future Kennel is registered under FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale) and NKC (National Kennel Club). We have always bred to a significantly stricter breed standard than the current American Bulldog breed standards under U.S.-based registries. Dogs with the following characteristics are not shown at conformation shows nor bred in our kennel: 1. Full black mask – this genetic trait is usually a result of another breed having been infused into the gene pool. 2. Kinked tail – this is considered to be a genetic defect of the spine and it may adversely affect the given dog’s offspring’s health. Usually a dog with a kinked tail itself is not at risk of health complications as a result of the kinked tail. 3. Blue eye(s) – a genetic mutation with possible health consequences and/or a genetic trait that is a result of another breed having been infused. 4. Coat colors other than white, white/brindle, or white/red – any colors beside these is usually a sure sign that another breed was infused into the gene pool. 5. Teeth – dogs missing more than 3 teeth. 6. Lack of skin pigmentation – pigment affects the overall health / immune system of the dog. Dogs lacking full pigmentation are more susceptible to various health problems. Lack of pigment is also responsible for deafness in dogs. We have never produced a deaf dog. We are proud of the dogs we produce. We have many repeat buyers – over 30 families have purchased 2,3,4, and even 5 dogs. Our dogs generally love children and have balanced temperament. We have always worked with diligence to improve our line of American Bulldogs. Having produced over 600 dogs in 7 generations, we have history and data that allows us to make some conclusions that we believe are significant. 1. The very common problem of hip dysplasia that afflicts this breed is nearly non-existent in our kennel. 2. Our dogs tend to have normal locomotion – good movement due to anatomically sound physical structure. 3. Our dogs have never torn ligaments, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 4. Our dogs have never prematurely died from heart problems, which leads us to conclude that such problems are likely hereditary in nature. 5. Our dogs tend to breathe well. 6. Our dogs tend to live long. 7. Our dogs have never been afflicted with cancer at a young age. The earliest instance of cancer has been encountered at 8 years of age by one dog. The remainder of cases have been documented at over 10 years of age. We don’t cut corners. The biggest tragedy for an owner is in having to care for a sick dog as a result of poor breeding, and be absolutely helpless as that dog passes in their arms. Exorbitant medical bills end up being paid to prolong the time together even by just a little with the beloved family member. As with any animal breeding program, our kennel is not immune from problems. The owners’ happiness with our dogs is paramount to us. We resolve any occasional problems that do arise to the owner’s satisfaction because we take pride in what we do, and we do it really well. Hearing the “Thank you!”s from owners of our dogs after years or even a lifetime is the greatest gift of all. This drives us to continually improve. We maintain contact and help our owners in any way we can; even at 4AM or during a vacation since we have owners all over the world in various timezones. Our breeding expertise enables us to deliver healthy, beautiful, strong, and intelligent American Bulldog puppies. We provide a contractual health guarantee against the following genetic health problems – Degenerative joint disease, hip dysplasia, knees, elbows, cataracts, entropion, ectropion, heart, kidneys, thyroid, epilepsy, ichthyosis, generalized demodex, cryptorchidism and any neurological disorders including NCL. All puppies in this litter are sold. For more photos, videos, and general information visit - http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/
Pomeranian Facts
 
01:52
POMERANIAN - Top Dog Facts About the POMERANIAN The Pomeranian, belonging to the Spitz family, is one of the most popular toy dog breeds in the world. The breed’s ancestors were sled dogs common in the Arctic region for long. One of the breeds descended from these tough dogs was the German Spitz, which was bred for smaller size in the Pomerania region, in modern-day Germany and Poland. From here, the smaller dog was taken to England around the mid-1700s, where it was first called the Pomeranian. These dogs were still larger in size compared to the modern Pomeranian, and were almost always white or grey in color. Queen Charlotte, the queen-consort of King Edward III, and Queen Victoria, helped make the breed popular in England. Queen Victoria also encouraged a systematic breeding program that focused on developing smaller dogs of a wider range of colors. The first breed standard was written in England towards the end of the 1800s. The Pomeranian came to the US around the same time, and has remained popular as a pet and as a show dog. Time for some Ruff Trivia: - The Pomeranian is known as the Zwergspitz in some countries. What does ‘Zwerg’ mean? o A: Happy o B: Dwarf o C: Home What do you think, give it your best guess in the comments below before we get to the answer! Hang on tight and we’ll get back to this Ruff Trivia Question toward the end of the video. The height of an adult Pomeranian is typically between 8 to 11 inches, and weight between 3 and 7 pounds. It has a thick, double coat, with a short dense undercoat and a profuse, harsh, long outer coat. The heavily plumed tail is set high and lies flat on the back. The most common colors are orange, black, cream or white, with less common colors being brown, red, blue, sable, tan, spotted, brindle, or combinations of any of these colors. Its ears are small; gait is smooth; and expression is alert and foxlike. Grooming: Daily brushing is recommended to keep the Pomeranian’s thick coat clean and without matting, as well as to minimize shedding. Many owners prefer to trim the coat every 1 to 2 months. Regular brushing of teeth, trimming of nails and cleaning of ears are needed. Environment: A Pomeranian is an extrovert by nature, loves being the center of attention and makes for an excellent family pet. It is very friendly with family members, loves to curl up in the lap of a grown up and is good with kids. It can get aggressive with other dogs and also tends to be very defensive when faced with new sounds or people. It is one of the more vocal breeds, particularly if not trained to stand down when instructed by the owner. Training: The Pomeranian is known to be an intelligent dog that can be trained easily. Because of its small size, its exercise needs are easily met by moving around inside the house, or a moderate walk. Health: The life expectancy of a Pomeranian is 12 to 16 years. Kneecap dislocation, tracheal collapse and severe hair loss are some common ailments. Cryptorchidism, a disorder in which one or both testicles do not descend, is a common issue, which can be easily treated through minor surgery. Merle-colored Pomeranians are prone to some additional genetic problems like deafness, ametropia, micropthalmia and colobomas. An outgoing, high-energy dog, the Pomeranian is perfect for a small apartment. It is very intelligent and eager to learn, and if you can give it some daily time for training and play, it will keep you company and entertain you with its antics too. Find out if the Pomeranian would be a good addition to your home. Now you can visit Brooklyn’s Corner.com to take our quiz and find out which dog would be the best match for you.
Views: 655 AllAboutDogs
Klinefelter syndrome and Barr body explaned
 
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What is Klinefelter syndrome? Klinefelter syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects male physical and cognitive development. Its signs and symptoms vary among affected individuals. Affected individuals typically have small testes that do not produce as much testosterone as usual. Testosterone is the hormone that directs male sexual development before birth and during puberty. A shortage of testosterone can lead to delayed or incomplete puberty, breast enlargement (gynecomastia), reduced facial and body hair, and an inability to have biological children (infertility). Some affected individuals also have genital differences including undescended testes (cryptorchidism), the opening of the urethra on the underside of the penis (hypospadias), or an unusually small penis (micropenis). Older children and adults with Klinefelter syndrome tend to be taller than their peers. Compared with unaffected men, adults with Klinefelter syndrome have an increased risk of developing breast cancer and a chronic inflammatory disease called systemic lupus erythematosus. Their chance of developing these disorders is similar to that of women in the general population. Children with Klinefelter syndrome may have learning disabilities and delayed speech and language development. They tend to be quiet, sensitive, and unassertive, but personality characteristics vary among affected individuals. How common is Klinefelter syndrome? Klinefelter syndrome affects 1 in 500 to 1,000 newborn males. Most variants of Klinefelter syndrome are much rarer, occurring in 1 in 50,000 or fewer newborns. Researchers suspect that Klinefelter syndrome is underdiagnosed because the condition may not be identified in people with mild signs and symptoms. Additionally, the features of the condition vary and overlap significantly with those of other conditions. What are the genetic changes related to Klinefelter syndrome? Klinefelter syndrome is a condition related to the X and Y chromosomes (the sex chromosomes). People typically have two sex chromosomes in each cell: females have two X chromosomes (46,XX), and males have one X and one Y chromosome (46,XY). Most often, Klinefelter syndrome results from the presence of one extra copy of the X chromosome in each cell (47,XXY). Extra copies of genes on the X chromosome interfere with male sexual development, often preventing the testes from functioning normally and reducing the levels of testosterone. Most people with an extra X chromosome have the features described above, although some have few or no associated signs and symptoms. Some people with features of Klinefelter syndrome have more than one extra sex chromosome in each cell (for example, 48,XXXY or 49,XXXXY). These conditions, which are often called variants of Klinefelter syndrome, tend to cause more severe signs and symptoms than classic Klinefelter syndrome. In addition to affecting male sexual development, variants of Klinefelter syndrome are associated with intellectual disability, distinctive facial features, skeletal abnormalities, poor coordination, and severe problems with speech. As the number of extra sex chromosomes increases, so does the risk of these health problems. Some people with features of Klinefelter syndrome have the extra X chromosome in only some of their cells; in these individuals, the condition is described as mosaic Klinefelter syndrome (46,XY/47,XXY). Individuals with mosaic Klinefelter syndrome may have milder signs and symptoms, depending on how many cells have an additional X chromosome. Read more about the X chromosome. Can Klinefelter syndrome be inherited? Klinefelter syndrome and its variants are not inherited; these chromosomal changes usually occur as random events during the formation of reproductive cells (eggs and sperm) in a parent. An error in cell division called nondisjunction results in a reproductive cell with an abnormal number of chromosomes. For example, an egg or sperm cell may gain one or more extra copies of the X chromosome as a result of nondisjunction. If one of these atypical reproductive cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have one or more extra X chromosomes in each of the body's cells. Mosaic 46,XY/47,XXY is also not inherited. It occurs as a random event during cell division early in fetal development. As a result, some of the body's cells have one X chromosome and one Y chromosome (46,XY), and other cells have an extra copy of the X chromosome (47,XXY).
American Bulldog Puppies For Sale - Grand Future Triumph x Urban's Eli of Tough Enough
 
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http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/ Breeding American Bulldogs since 2001. Home to 13 Grand Champions and 34 Champions spanning 9 countries. Location: Nevada, USA Puppies born December 29th, 2017 Litter "E" 7 males and 2 females. 6th generation Grand Future puppies. Breeder: Olga Sushko Contact: [email protected] The contract stipulates money-back guarantees against the following genetic health problems - hip and elbow dysplasia, patellas, osteoarthritis, cataracts, heart, kidneys, thyroid, ichthyosis, demodex, cryptorchidism and any neurological disorders including epilepsy and NCL DAM: Grand Future Triumph Penn Hip: 0.36/0.42 | OFA Elbows: Normal OFA Patellas: normal, OFA Spine: normal, OFA Heart: normal NCL: clear, Ichthyosis (ICH): clear | DNA Profile SIRE: Urban's Eli of Tough Enough Penn Hip: 0.32/0.42 NCL: clear, Ichthyosis (ICH): carrier | DNA Profile Litter Pedigree: http://www.pedigreedatabase.com/american_bulldog/breeding.result?father=1253372&mother=2532856 More information: http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/american-bulldog-puppies-for-sale-grand-future-triumph-x-urbans-eli-of-tough-enough/ As of January 2nd, 2018, one male and one female are reserved. $500 deposit to reserve a pick can be made here: http://www.grandfuturekennel.com/payment/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/grandfuture.kennel/ Of course our preference is for you to come visit our kennel, get acquainted with us, and pick up your new American Bulldog puppy in person. However, we understand that it is not feasible for everyone. Even if you do not live anywhere near Nevada, do not be concerned – we are highly experienced at shipping our American Bulldog puppies worldwide, as even just the list of our Grand Champions and Champions spanning 9 nations attests. We will even prepare all necessary export documentation free of charge. Shipping domestically includes the following and all other locations that can be reached via a direct flight or ground transport: Alabama, AL; Alaska, AK; Arizona, AZ; Arkansas, AR; California , CA; Colorado, CO; Connecticut, CT; Delaware, DE; Florida, FL; Georgia, GA; Hawaii, HI; Idaho, ID; Illinois, IL; Indiana, IN; Iowa, IA; Kansas, KS; Kentucky, KY; Louisiana, LA; Maine, ME; Maryland, MD; Massachusetts, MA; Michigan, MI; Minnesota, MN; Mississippi, MS; Missouri, MO; Montana, MT; Nebraska, NE; Nevada, NV; New Hampshire, NH; New Jersey, NJ; New Mexico, NM; New York, NY; North Carolina, NC; North Dakota, ND; Ohio, OH; Oklahoma, OK; Oregon, OR; Pennsylvania, PA; Rhode Island, RI; South Carolina, SC; South Dakota, SD; Tennessee, TN; Texas, TX; Utah, UT; Vermont, VT; Virginia , VA; Washington, WA; West Virginia, WV; Wisconsin, WI; Wyoming, WY as well as of Canada: Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, and Quebec. American Bulldogs produced by Grand Future Kennel already reside in all of the following countries: United States, Israel, Netherlands, Estonia, Latvia, Russia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Ukraine, Finland, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Greece, Cypress, Czech Republic, and even Kuwait – United Arab Emirates (UAE)! Music by Melissa B. - Album - Computer Love, Title: It's Beautiful. Creative Commons license.
Views: 381 Igor Sushko
SPERM MOTILITY - DACHSHUND DOG @ LYKA PET CLINIC & SURGICAL CENTRE - DINDIGUL
 
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SPERM MOTILITY - DACHSHUND DOG @ LYKA PET CLINIC & SURGICAL CENTRE - DINDIGUL
Views: 411 Venkatesh warlu
Fertility Top Tips! Male Infertility | Investigations | London
 
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Male Infertility What causes male infertility? Conditions affecting a man’s fertility include: - low sperm count or quality - problems with the tubes carrying sperm - problems getting an erection - problems ejaculating - having received medical treatment such as drug treatment, radiotherapy or surgery – for example to correct a hernia, undescended testes or twisted testicles - genetic problems - medical conditions such as diabetes - lifestyle factors such as being overweight or having a job that involves contact with chemicals or radiation. - age - male fertility is also thought to decline with age, although to what extent is unclear. 80% of couples who have regular sexual intercourse (that is, three to four times a week) and who do not use contraception will get pregnant within a year. To learn more visit ivfmatters.co.uk What are the tests done to assess male infertility? Semen analysis We recommend two to three days’ abstinence before producing the sample. Sperm DNA fragmentation The DNA fragmentation index is an indicator of the fragility or DNA damage within the sperm. Sperm with high DNA fragmentation may fertilise an egg but embryo development may be compromised and there is evidence that there might be an increased risk of miscarriage. To learn more visit ivfmatters.co.uk
Views: 43 Dr Irfana Koita
Diethylbestrol (DES)
 
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Presentation for ENVIRON 310, Winter semester, 2014. University of Michigan. Image's credits: http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTheM6iN3nBM2ziWENCc-9v6FviLpKMhOMOqeKn7qFHyr8kmMwvhg http://img.scoop.it/YNBi_ws9x6uJn4ZQp7Ii6jl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBV9ip2J1EIeUzA9paTSgKmv http://comps.canstockphoto.com/can-stock-photo_csp12135054.jpg http://www.johngraycentre.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/family-tree-cartoon.jpg https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRNbvgmhz7NdZuI- http://www.fertilityclinicmumbai.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/t-shaped-uterus0004.jpg http://diethylstilbestrol.umwblogs.org/files/2011/02/desplex-ad-2.gif http://www.rts.ch/2012/05/14/16/33/3992619.image?w=474&h=315 http://www.i-am-pregnant.com/images/Cryptorchidism.jpg http://file.scirp.org/Html/19-2280044%5Cf824616b-f61b-4520-9c81-ae60b4259fd0.jpg http://static6.depositphotos.com/1118147/619/v/950/depositphotos_6199946-Colored-male-and-female-sign-vector.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/80/DNA_methylation.jpg http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/epigenetics/inheritance/images/DirectExposure.jpg Other references: Boyer, M. J. and Tattersall, M. H. N. Diethylstilbestrol revisited in advanced breast cancer management. Med. Pediatr. Oncol. 1990; 18: 317--320. doi: 10.1002/mpo.2950180412 Bromer JG, Wu J, Zhou Y, Taylor HS. Hypermethylation of HOXA10 by in utero Diethylstilbestrol Exposure: An Epigenetic Mechanism for Altered Developmental Programming. Endocrinology. 2009 May 1;Vol.30, Issue 3. Burroughs W. Method of raising beef cattle and sheep and feed rations for use therein. Application to the United States Patent Office for use of DES as a growth stimulant in cattle feed, patented June 19,1956. Greenberg ER, Barnes AB, Resseguie L, Barrett JA, Burnside S, Lanza LL, Neff RK, Stevens M, Young RH, Colton T. Breast cancer in mothers given diethylstilbestrol in pregnancy. N Engl J Med. 1984 Nov 29;311(22):1393-8. Klip H, Verloop J, van Gool JD, Koster META, Burger CW, van Leeuwen FE. Hypospadias in sons of women exposed to DES in utero. A cohort study. Lancet 2002;259:1102--7. Ma L, Benson GV, Lim H, Dey SK, Maas RL. Abdominal B (AbdB) Hoxa genes: regulation in adult uterus by estrogen and progesterone and repression in müllerian duct by the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES). Dev Biol. 1998 May 15;197(2):141-54. Malkowicz SB. The role of diethylstilbestrol in the treatment of prostate cancer. Urology. 2001 Aug;58(2 Suppl 1):108-13. Merck Animal Health Website. Available ir: http://www.merck-animal-health-usa.com/news/2012-10-1.aspx. Access: 04/13/2014. Nam K, Marshall P, Wolf RM, Cornell W. Simulation of the different biological activities of diethylstilbestrol (DES) on estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor gamma. Biopolymers. 2003 Jan; 68(1):130-8. Newbold RR, Hanson RB, Jefferson WN, Bullock BC, Haseman J, McLachlan JA. Proliferative lesions and reproductive tract tumors in male descendants of mice exposed developmentally to diethylstilbestrol. Carcinogenesis 2000;21:355--63. Newbold RR, McLachlan JA. Transplacental hormonal carcinogenesis: diethylstilbestrol as an example. In: Huff J, Boyd J, Barrett JC. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Hormonal Carcinogenesis: Environmental Influences. New York: Wiley Liss & Sons, 1996, pp. 131--47. PubChem Website. Diethylbestrol. Available in: http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/summary/summary.cgi?cid=448537#itabs-2d . Access: 04/13/2014. Raun, A. P. & Preston, R. L. History of Diethylstilbestrol Use in Cattle, pp. 1--7. American Society of Animal Science, Savoy, IL, USA, 2002. Vickie R. Walker, Wendy N. Jefferson, John F. Couse, Kenneth S. Korach. Estrogen Receptor-α Mediates Diethylstilbestrol-Induced Feminization of the Seminal Vesicle in Male Mice. Environ Health Perspect. 2012 April; 120(4): 560--565.
Pomeranian (dog)
 
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The Pomeranian (often known as a Pom or Pom Pom) is a breed of dog of the Spitz type, named for the Pomerania region in Central Europe (today part of northern Poland and eastern Germany). Classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size, the Pomeranian is descended from the larger Spitz type dogs, specifically the German Spitz. It has been determined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale to be part of the German Spitz breed, and in many countries, they are known as the Zwergspitz (Dwarf Spitz). The breed has been made popular by a number of royal owners since the 18th century. Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian and consequently the smaller variety became universally popular. During Queen Victoria's lifetime alone, the size of the breed decreased by 50%. Overall, the Pomeranian is a sturdy, healthy dog. The most common health issue is Luxating patella. Tracheal collapse can also be an issue. More rarely, the breed can suffer from a skin condition colloquially known as "black skin disease", or Alopecia X. This is a genetic disease which causes the dog's skin to turn black and lose all or most of its hair. The breed is currently among the top 15 most popular in the USA, and the current fashion for small dogs has increased their popularity worldwide. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 105 Audiopedia
Smooch! (Brand New Key)
 
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Original video jazzed up a bit with music and baby pictures :) This is my dwarved mini horse Smooch. He is almost 3 now, but this is an older video. Any way, he's still a stallion so he's kinda rascally. Enjoy! P.S. He is deformed, he is a braciocephalic dwarf and was born without tendons in his hind legs. Thats why his feet look like that, not becuase we don't trim them. We have a ferrier come out every 3 weeks to trim them. http://youtube.com/watch?v=JukduvnIkJA He is not fat due to over feeding, but becuase his organs are too big for his frame making his belly distended. We have not gelded him because he cannot handle the aneasthesia. Also he is a bilateral cryptorchid, which means niether of his testicles have dropped even though he is 2 1/2 years old. So couldn't breed even if he had the chance to, which won't happen because we don't have any mares on the property. We had a 16hh thoroughbred, but sold her. Our vet also thought it would be a good idea not to because if he has testosterone in his system and he is actively chasing things, it will help keep his wieght down. And the Biting problem has since been absolved. We gently trained him out of it soon after he discovered our Achilles' tendons. He is not in pain, he is not suffering, and he has frequent visits to the vet to ensure that he is healthy. It was an accidental breeding, a friend of ours breeds mini's and we took him in so that he could recieve the best care possible. After breeding mini's for twenty years, he was her first dwarf. She has since gelded and sold his sire, seeing as how it was his first get with a seasoned brood mare. These animals are not purposefully bred as far as I know, because of the complications involved. And please, please, PLEASE take the time to look through some previous comments before you start trying to berate me and my decision not to geld him and keep him alive instead of euthanizing him. I can assure you, I have pretty much answered all questions. If you have one that has not been previously asked by someone else, by all means feel free to post it, I only ask that you be respectful. Also, His tail has since been trimmed. The purpose of this video was to see him with his tail before i cut it. Also, it really wasn't that much of a problem, he can't really go backwards and that is the only time his tail ever would have become a problem.
Views: 10792 angryfrog
Pomeranian (dog)
 
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The Pomeranian is a breed of dog of the Spitz type, named for the Pomerania region in Central Europe . Classed as a toy dog breed because of its small size, the Pomeranian is descended from the larger Spitz type dogs, specifically the German Spitz. It has been determined by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale to be part of the German Spitz breed, and in many countries, they are known as the Zwergspitz . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 134 encyclopediacc
From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads And Men
 
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Tyrone B. Hayes, February 7, 2017 Tyrone B. Hayes' research interests lie in the impact of chemical contaminants on environmental health and public health. In this lecture, he examines the impact of endocrine disrupting environmental contaminants on environmental and public health. See more Ath videos: http://tinyurl.com/MMCAth ► Like this video? SUBSCRIBE: http://tinyurl.com/CMCchannel ► Visit our website: http://www.cmc.edu/ ► Follow CMC: https://www.facebook.com/ClaremontMcKennaCollege https://twitter.com/cmcnews https://www.instagram.com/cmcnews/
Australian Kelpie
 
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The Kelpie is an Australian sheep dog successful at mustering and droving with little or no command guidance. They are medium-sized dogs and come in a variety of colours. Kelpies have been exported throughout the world and are used to muster livestock, primarily sheep, cattle and goats. The breed has been separated into two distinct varieties: the show or bench Kelpie and the working Kelpie. The show Kelpie is seen at conformation dog shows in some countries and is selected for appearance rather than working instinct. Working Kelpies are bred for working ability rather than appearance. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 161 Audiopedia
Chronic Hazard Advisory Panel: Phthalates Am Session
 
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Original broadcast date: April 15, 2010.