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Free Cryptocurrency Course: Learn Everything You Need to Know About Cryptocurrencies Today!
 
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Want more? Enroll in the full course at: https://www.udemy.com/the-complete-cryptocurrency-course-more-than-5-courses-in-1/?couponCode=WB73018CCC Here are more details on the full 24 hour version of this Comprehensive COMPLETE Cryptocurrency Course! I guarantee that this is THE most thorough cryptocurrency course available ANYWHERE on the market - or your money back (30 day money back guarantee). This course and the many exercises in this course are for beginner or advanced users in any country! By an Award Winning MBA professor who is a top selling online business teacher, top selling author, former Goldman Sachs employee, Columbia MBA (finance major) and venture capitalist who has invested in and sat on the boards of cryptocurrency companies since 2013 and a hedge fund industry veteran and founder. He is also the author of the #1 best selling business course on Udemy. THIS COMPLETE CRYPTOCURRENCY COURSE is 5+ courses in 1! Cryptocurrency Investing Cryptocurrency Mining Cryptocurrency Wallets Cryptocurrency Exchanges Blockchain Creating a Diversified Portfolio & Much More! Also included in this course is a very comprehensive Excel spreadsheet that contains more than 30 Cryptocurrency exercises to help you learn everything you need to know about cryptocurrencies (whether you are a beginner or an advanced user). No prior cryptocurrency or finance or accounting or tech or Excel experience is required to take this course. We Will Cover More than 10 Cryptocurrencies in this Course (and how to buy & sell each one, what are the pros and cons of each one & how to mine each one): Bitcoin Ethereum Ripple Litecoin Monero Zcash Dash NEO Cardano Stellar ...and more (this course will constantly be updated with more cryptocurrencies) We Will Cover More than 5 Wallets in this Course (how to set one up, the pros & cons of all 5 wallet types and how to transfer money between them): QR Code Wallets Four USB Wallets (Trezor. Ledger Nano S, DigitalBitBox & KeepKey) Coinbase Electrum Blockchain ...and more (this course will constantly be updated with more wallets) We Will Cover the More than 5 Exchanges in this Course (how to transact with each one): GDAX Poloniex Kraken Bittrex Gemini Binance ...& more (this course will constantly be updated with more exchanges) Here Are Some More Topics That We Will Cover In This Course: The Future of Money & What is Blockchain? Introduction to 10+ Cryptocurrencies (Mining, Investing & Much More) Create an Investment Portfolio of Cryptocurrencies Understand What Makes a Great Cryptocurrency as A Great Long-Term Investment Introduction to 5+ Wallets to Use to Store Your Cryptocurrencies Introduction to 5+ Exchanges to Use to Buy or Sell Cryptocurrencies Introduction to Mining & Building a Mining PC from Scratch! Cryptocurrency Investment Framework (made in Excel) Watching out for Scams & Managing Risk What Are the Biggest Mistakes New Investors Make in Cryptocurrencies? How to Identify the Next Great Cryptocurrency (What to Look For & Watch Out For) When Should You Buy or Sell a Cryptocurrency? How Do You Read Charts & Look for Buy or Sell Signals What Makes a Great Wallet (What to Look For From Researching a Wallet) Introduction to ICOs + What Makes a Great ICO (What To Look For From Researching An ICO More than 100 Great Online Cryptocurrency Resources You can use the comprehensive Excel exercise document in this course on a Mac or on a PC (I recommend having Excel version 2013 or later in order to complete all of the cryptocurrency exercises in this course). This course and the included comprehensive Complete Cryptocurrency Excel dashboard exercise file is a roadmap for your personal & technical/finance cryptocurrency success. All of the tools you need to be successful with cryptocurrencies are included in this course & the entire course is based on real life Practical Knowledge and experience & not based on theory. Please click the take this course button so you can take your cryptocurrency skills to the next level. Requirements: No prior technology or cryptocurrency or finance or accounting or Excel experience is required to take this course. Please note that Excel 2013 (or a newer version) is recommended in order to complete some of the exercises in this course. The Excel exercises in this course work on the Windows and Mac versions of Excel. Who is the target audience? Anyone in ANY country interested in learning EVERYTHING about cryptocurrency can take this course as this 23+ hour COMPLETE course is 5+ courses in 1 (1: Investing, 2: Mining, 3: Wallets, 4: Blockchain , 5: Transacting, 6: Creating a Diversified Portfolio & Much More!) *** Again, I guarantee that this is THE most thorough cryptocurrency course available ANYWHERE on the market - or your money back (30 day money back guarantee). *** Enroll in the full course at: https://www.udemy.com/the-complete-cryptocurrency-course-more-than-5-courses-in-1/?couponCode=WB73018CCC Thanks, Chris Haroun
Tech Talk: Vehicle Cybersecurity
 
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As vehicles become more connected through new infotainment and telematics capabilities, the risk for cyber-attacks increases. In this video, S&T cyber security experts and our partners at the U.S. Department of Transportation Volpe Center discuss recent efforts to improve cyber security in government vehicle fleets and answer audience questions. For information on S&T’s work in vehicle cyber security, visit: https://www.dhs.gov/science-and-technology/csd-cpssec
GSA Reverse Industry Training: Session 5: Avoiding Non-Compliant On-Site Configuration
 
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In collaboration with FICAM, GSA’s Reverse Industry Training on September 17th, 2018, this session will provide guidance on how to avoid non-compliant on-site configurations of approved PACS equipment. Even though a PACS may be listed on the Approved Products List doesn’t mean the configuration implemented in the field is compliant. You’ll gain a greater understanding of how an approved PACS can still be implemented in a non-compliant manner. Details on how agencies often work against permitting compliant implementations will also be shared. Rob Zivney, IDentification Technology Partners Tony Damalas, Signet / Convergint Federal Solutions www.gsa.gov
Information security
 
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Information security, sometimes shortened to InfoSec, is the practice of defending information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction. It is a general term that can be used regardless of the form the data may take (electronic, physical, etc.) This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 83 Audiopedia
Technical Guidelines Development Committee (TGDC) Meeting — Day 1
 
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EAC and NIST are pleased to announce the upcoming meeting of the TGDC on September 11-12, 2017, at the U.S. Election Assistance Commission in Silver Spring, Maryland. The meeting will be the next step in moving forward with the development of the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (VVSG) version 2.0. Presentations and discussions at the meeting will include the following topics: (1) Update from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); (2) Review of Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (VVSG 2.0), Adoption Process and Transitioning Standards; (3) Security & Accessibility Meeting Update; (4) Overview and Discussion of Principles & Guidelines; (5) Overview & Update on Requirements and Test Assertions; (6) Cyber Security Presentation; and (7) Critical Infrastructure/MS-ISAC Presentation. Committee members will discuss next steps in the adoption process for VVSG 2.0. The full meeting agenda will be posted in advance at http://vote.nist.gov/. All sessions of this meeting will be open to the public. Members of the public may submit relevant written statements to the TGDC with respect to the meeting no later than 5:00 pm EDT on Tuesday, September 5, 2017. Statements may be sent via email at [email protected], via standard mail addressed to the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, 1335 East West Highway, Suite 4300, Silver Spring, MD 20910, or by fax at 301-734-3108. All comments will also be posted on http://vote.nist.gov/. The TGDC was established in accordance with the requirements of Section 221 of the Help America Vote Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-252, codified at 42 U.S.C 15361) to act in the public interest to assist the Executive Director of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission (EAC) in the development of voluntary voting system guidelines. Details regarding the TGDC's activities are available at http://vote.nist.gov/.
TGDC Meeting 091117 Part 1
 
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EAC and NIST TGDC meeting on September 11-12, 2017, at the U.S. Election Assistance Commission in Silver Spring, Maryland. The meeting was an important next step in moving forward with the development of the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines (VVSG) version 2.0.
Information security
 
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Information security, sometimes shortened to InfoSec, is the practice of defending information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction. It is a general term that can be used regardless of the form the data may take This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 476 encyclopediacc
Signals intelligence in modern history | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signals_intelligence_in_modern_history 00:01:51 1 Origins 00:04:20 2 World War I 00:06:43 2.1 Cracking the German naval codes 00:13:05 2.2 Direction finding 00:16:45 2.3 Zimmermann Telegram & Other Successes 00:19:12 3 Interwar period 00:19:56 3.1 United Kingdom 00:22:41 3.2 Germany 00:23:44 3.3 United States 00:25:47 4 World War II 00:28:59 4.1 British SIGINT 00:33:57 4.1.1 German codes 00:39:52 4.1.2 Italian codes 00:42:14 4.1.3 Japanese codes 00:44:09 4.2 US SIGINT 00:46:37 4.2.1 Japanese codes 00:51:04 5 Cold War 00:52:45 5.1 US Tactical SIGINT 00:56:48 6 Recent history 00:58:20 6.1 Threat from terrorism 01:02:41 6.2 European Space Systems cooperation Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7999695861778456 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= SIGINT is a contraction of SIGnals INTelligence. Before the development of radar and other electronics techniques, signals intelligence and communications intelligence (COMINT) were essentially synonymous. Sir Francis Walsingham ran a postal interception bureau with some cryptanalytic capability during the reign of Elizabeth I, but the technology was only slightly less advanced than men with shotguns, during World War I, who jammed pigeon post communications and intercepted the messages carried. Flag signals were sometimes intercepted, and efforts to impede them made the occupation of the signaller one of the most dangerous on the battlefield. The middle 19th century rise of the telegraph allowed more scope for interception and spoofing of signals, as shown at Chancellorsville. Signals intelligence became far more central to military (and to some extent diplomatic) intelligence generally with the mechanization of armies, development of blitzkrieg tactics, use of submarine and commerce raiders warfare, and the development of practicable radio communications. Even Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT) preceded electronic intelligence (ELINT), with sound ranging techniques for artillery location. SIGINT is the analysis of intentional signals for both communications and non-communications (e.g., radar) systems, while MASINT is the analysis of unintentional information, including, but not limited to, the electromagnetic signals that are the main interest in SIGINT.
Views: 33 wikipedia tts
Radar | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Radar Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Radar is a detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s). Radio waves (pulsed or continuous) from the transmitter reflect off the object and return to the receiver, giving information about the object's location and speed. Radar was developed secretly for military use by several nations in the period before and during World War II. A key development was the cavity magnetron in the UK, which allowed the creation of relatively small systems with sub-meter resolution. The term RADAR was coined in 1940 by the United States Navy as an acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging or RAdio Direction And Ranging. The term radar has since entered English and other languages as a common noun, losing all capitalization. The modern uses of radar are highly diverse, including air and terrestrial traffic control, radar astronomy, air-defence systems, antimissile systems, marine radars to locate landmarks and other ships, aircraft anticollision systems, ocean surveillance systems, outer space surveillance and rendezvous systems, meteorological precipitation monitoring, altimetry and flight control systems, guided missile target locating systems, ground-penetrating radar for geological observations, and range-controlled radar for public health surveillance. High tech radar systems are associated with digital signal processing, machine learning and are capable of extracting useful information from very high noise levels. Other systems similar to radar make use of other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. One example is "lidar", which uses predominantly infrared light from lasers rather than radio waves.
Views: 41 wikipedia tts
Timeline of United States inventions (1946–1991) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_United_States_inventions_(1946%E2%80%931991) 00:03:20 1 Cold War (1946–1991) 00:03:33 1.1 Post-war and the late 1940s (1946–1949) 00:24:12 1.2 1950s 01:07:39 1.3 1960s 01:49:11 1.4 1970s 02:20:18 1.5 1980s and the early 1990s (1980–1991) 02:39:13 2 See also 02:39:22 3 Footnotes 02:39:31 4 Further reading 02:40:38 5 External links Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7346002310281773 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A timeline of United States inventions (1946–1991) encompasses the ingenuity and innovative advancements of the United States within a historical context, dating from the era of the Cold War, which have been achieved by inventors who are either native-born or naturalized citizens of the United States. Copyright protection secures a person's right to his or her first-to-invent claim of the original invention in question, highlighted in Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 of the United States Constitution which gives the following enumerated power to the United States Congress: In 1641, the first patent in North America was issued to Samuel Winslow by the General Court of Massachusetts for a new method of making salt. On April 10, 1790, President George Washington signed the Patent Act of 1790 (1 Stat. 109) into law which proclaimed that patents were to be authorized for "any useful art, manufacture, engine, machine, or device, or any improvement therein not before known or used." On July 31, 1790, Samuel Hopkins of Pittsford, Vermont became the first person in the United States to file and to be granted a patent for an improved method of "Making Pot and Pearl Ashes." The Patent Act of 1836 (Ch. 357, 5 Stat. 117) further clarified United States patent law to the extent of establishing a patent office where patent applications are filed, processed, and granted, contingent upon the language and scope of the claimant's invention, for a patent term of 14 years with an extension of up to an additional 7 years. However, the Uruguay Round Agreements Act of 1994 (URAA) changed the patent term in the United States to a total of 20 years, effective for patent applications filed on or after June 8, 1995, thus bringing United States patent law further into conformity with international patent law. The modern-day provisions of the law applied to inventions are laid out in Title 35 of the United States Code (Ch. 950, sec. 1, 66 Stat. 792). From 1836 to 2011, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a total of 7,861,317 patents relating to several well-known inventions appearing throughout the timeline below. Some examples of patented inventions between the years 1946 and 1991 include William Shockley's transistor (1947), John Blankenbaker's personal computer (1971), Vinton Cerf's and Robert Kahn's Internet protocol/TCP (1973), and Martin Cooper's mobile phone (1973).
Views: 163 wikipedia tts
Timeline of United States inventions (1946–91) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Timeline of United States inventions (1946–91) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A timeline of United States inventions (1946–1991) encompasses the ingenuity and innovative advancements of the United States within a historical context, dating from the era of the Cold War, which have been achieved by inventors who are either native-born or naturalized citizens of the United States. Copyright protection secures a person's right to his or her first-to-invent claim of the original invention in question, highlighted in Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 of the United States Constitution which gives the following enumerated power to the United States Congress: In 1641, the first patent in North America was issued to Samuel Winslow by the General Court of Massachusetts for a new method of making salt. On April 10, 1790, President George Washington signed the Patent Act of 1790 (1 Stat. 109) into law which proclaimed that patents were to be authorized for "any useful art, manufacture, engine, machine, or device, or any improvement therein not before known or used." On July 31, 1790, Samuel Hopkins of Pittsford, Vermont became the first person in the United States to file and to be granted a patent for an improved method of "Making Pot and Pearl Ashes." The Patent Act of 1836 (Ch. 357, 5 Stat. 117) further clarified United States patent law to the extent of establishing a patent office where patent applications are filed, processed, and granted, contingent upon the language and scope of the claimant's invention, for a patent term of 14 years with an extension of up to an additional 7 years. However, the Uruguay Round Agreements Act of 1994 (URAA) changed the patent term in the United States to a total of 20 years, effective for patent applications filed on or after June 8, 1995, thus bringing United States patent law further into conformity with international patent law. The modern-day provisions of the law applied to inventions are laid out in Title 35 of the United States Code (Ch. 950, sec. 1, 66 Stat. 792). From 1836 to 2011, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a total of 7,861,317 patents relating to several well-known inventions appearing throughout the timeline below. Some examples of patented inventions between the years 1946 and 1991 include William Shockley's transistor (1947), John Blankenbaker's personal computer (1971), Vinton Cerf's and Robert Kahn's Internet protocol/TCP (1973), and Martin Cooper's mobile phone (1973).
Views: 189 wikipedia tts