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Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis
 
10:03
http://healthypets.mercola.com/ Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses the symptoms of Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis and what to do if your cat experiences it.
Views: 18726 Mercola
Feline focal seizure Post-ictal phase
 
00:41
FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 75 C Con
Feline Focal Seizure Post-ictal Lethargy
 
05:06
FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 56 C Con
Cat Asthma Attack -- what to look for in your kitty
 
00:58
Poor Casper. After rescuing this big boy from the outdoors (his previous owner's abandoned him), we found him doing this strange cough. It didn't look like a hairball cough and happened often enough that it concerned us. So we took this video to show our vet. And sure enough, this is the telltale sign of kitty asthma. They also took X-rays to verify. This is what a feline asthma attack looks and sounds like. During an asthma attack, a cat will put his head down near the ground and stretch his neck out (like a seal). This is not a hairball cough. Feline asthma affects approximately 1% of the american domestic feline population. Casper is now taking a steroid, Prednisolone, daily which has helped to decrease the frequency of his attacks. If you see your cat doing this, take him to the vet for a check-up.
Views: 504843 MeowValet
Dr. Becker Discusses Canine Leptospirosis
 
07:32
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/02/25/canine-leptospirosis.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses canine leptospirosis, which is found in most domesticated and wild animals.
Views: 28728 MercolaHealthyPets
Cat having seizure (neurologic disease)
 
01:19
Here is video of my 5-year old cat, Churro, having a seizure (or muscle spasm?). See his legs sticking straight out, trembling from his muscles tensed rock solid, his head strained backwards. The episode lasted until he's placed down on the floor. These episodes have been getting steadily worse over the last year or so, as his neurologic disease progresses. Sorry the video starts out blurry! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. This is in this video, and also there is a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q), but I haven't caught the full-body seizure on video; • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 24284 Susie Lorden
#5 Cat muscle spasm (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:30
This video shows my 5-year old cat with degenerative neurologic disease twitching when he lays down (at .3, .8, .18, .21, and .27 seconds in this video - though it's kind of hard to see in this video). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see THIS VIDEO at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 43423 Susie Lorden
APIS MEL
 
24:10
Views: 1381 TV Mídia
#1 Cat falling over, losing balance (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:25
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 3950 Susie Lorden
Why Is Your Cat’s Mouth Health So Important?
 
01:47
If untreated, the bacteria in your cat’s mouth can leader to bigger problems causing your cat discomfort or worse. Feline specialist, Dr. Elizabeth Ruelle explains how to keep your cat’s mouth healthy and how to tell if an unhealthy mouth has caused further problems. For more information, please visit http://cathealthy.ca
Views: 401 Cat Healthy
AIDS Infections and Malignancies | NCLEX Review 2019
 
15:13
*Subscribe for more great NCLEX videos: https://www.goo.gl/8mBXbY Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is an acquired infection that causes severe immune dysfunction. HIV infection causes the person to be unusually susceptible to other life-threatening infections and malignancies. HIV is caused by a retrovirus that in its most serious form, results in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Click here: https://www.mometrix.com/academy/nclex-exam/drug-suffixes/ ► Visit: http://www.mometrix.com/academy ► Subscribe to more free test preparation videos: http://bit.ly/1dJH1yb ► Follow Mometrix Academy on Pinterest: http://bit.ly/1hZE2Jj ► Learn more About Us: http://bit.ly/1ewIADC
Views: 7688 NCLEX Study Guide