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British Columbia to import low-wage miners from China
 
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Liberal leader Christy Clark touts coal mining as a jobs machine for British Columbia. Too bad many of those jobs will go to low-wage workers imported from China. HD Mining is backed by Chinese investment. The company plans to operate a mine near Tumbler Ridge. HD Mining claimed it couldn't find qualified Canadians. Maybe this was because its job adverts required Mandarin skills. Meanwhile, the Chinese miners are only required to know 100 English words. And they are willing to work for peanuts compared with their Canadian counterparts. The government has already approved 201 Chinese miners to work at Tumbler Ridge on a temporary basis. But as many as 2,000 Chinese miners could be expected to work at the mine eventually. Of course, you get what you pay for. Chinese mines are the most dangerous in the world. Last year, about 2,000 miners died in accidents. ---------------------------------------­----------------------------------------­ Daily videos brought to you by THE Taiwanese Animators behind the infamous Tiger Woods animation. We got the funniest animations on the web to help you stay in-the-know on all the trending stories, so sit back, relax, and watch a few. Visit our channel for your daily dose of Taiwanese Animations: https://www.youtube.com/user/NMATV Wish all your news was animated? Subscribe now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=NMATV
Views: 1870 NMATV
Motorart Volvo BM H10 Historic Wheel Loader by Cranes Etc TV
 
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This is the Cranes Etc TV review of Motorart's 1/50 scale model of the historic Volvo BM H10 Wheel Loader. The model number is 300054. The full review is on the Cranes Etc website: http://www.CranesEtc.co.uk.
Views: 55753 CranesEtcTV
Rathbone's Stick Sees Risk of Further Lloyds Loan Losses
 
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Feb. 26 (Bloomberg) -- Carl Stick, a director at Rathbone Unit Trust Management Ltd., talks with Bloomberg's Poppy Trowbridge about Lloyds Banking Group Plc's full-year loss.
Views: 120 Bloomberg
Parent company HDI refuse Sisson Brook Mine meetings for Fredericton and Saint Mary's First Nations
 
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Several communities downstream from the proposed Sisson Brook Mine are excluded from the Federal Environmental Impact Assessment open house meetings being conducted by the mining company, even though all these communities share the same Nashwaak River watershed. Myke Clark, Senior Manager Public Affair for Hunter Dickinson Inc. (Vancouver, BC), acknowledges that his company will not provide public comment meetings for Fredericton citizens and the Saint Mary's First Nation community during their ongoing Federal environmental impact assessment (EIA) process. The closing date for public input into the Federal EIA process is October 14, 2013. PROPOSED SISSON MINE (CONSERVATION COUNCIL OF NEW BRUNSWICK) http://www.conservationcouncil.ca/ccnbaction/sisson-mine-project/ SUMMARY NOTES FROM LAST NIGHT'S OPEN HOUSE IN STANLEY, N.B. : At the Sisson Project Open House in the Stanley Area last evening (October 1, 2013), the spokesperson for NB Power confirmed that the new powerline to service the Sisson Mine will cost NB ratepayers $9 Million. So much for Craig Leonard's claim of no government subsidy for this project. Also, it became clear at the Open House that Northcliff has ignored Fredericton and the other communities of the Lower Nashwaak in its public notices of Open House times and locations. Given that Open Houses are being held in Stanley, Juniper, and as far away as Nackawic, and given that it has been reported that notices were distributed as far away as Woodstock, it would appear that Northcliff is fearful of facing the public of the Lower Nashwaak. This behaviour begs the question "WHY?". MLA Kirk MacDonald spoke briefly with protesters outside the event, but MP Mike Allen could not get past the protest group fast enough; it was actually quite comical to watch the retreat. Joanne Weiss-Reid of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) was on hand and spoke briefly with me about my official complaint that CEAA has placed the public and the provincial Technical Review Committee at an extreme disadvantage by releasing an incomplete Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), already acknowledged to be premature by the authors. The CEAA action has not only wasted precious participatory funding, it has also wasted a significant chunk of the agency's allotted 12 months of total EA response time. The release of a study report containing conclusions based on studies acknowledged by the authors to be incomplete is in nobody's interest. It would be a strategic time for any reviewers who have reached a similar conclusion about the incompleteness of the EIS to make their feelings known to Ms. Weiss-Reid and the CEAA with a copy to Mike Atkinson of CEAA, who was also present at the open house and got an earful on this subject. Here are their e-mail coordinates: [email protected] [email protected]
Views: 1006 Mark D'Arcy
Item # 16261 START UP Power Screen 1600 Hernando Co FL Public Online Auction
 
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For your consideration a Trommel Screen with Caterpillar Diesel offered at public auction by Atkinson Realty and Auction. This power screen along with many other vehicles as well as equipment belonging to Hernando Co FL will be auctioned online, being sold to the highest bidder. For more information please visit www.atkinsononline.com and register today.
Idle No More: Protest to Change?
 
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Momentum and a movement: Idle No More organizers, supporters and observers discuss the objectives and significance of the movement with Steve Paikin.
Enduro Tour in  Kroatien |  Mai 2016 | EMX-Park
 
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Enduro Tour Kroatien Mai 2016 mit Enduro Croatia http://www.emx-park.at http://www.enduro-croatia.com
Views: 2237 EMX-Park
Residential School Survivor Personal Stories
 
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Part 1 of 2 Personal stories by Elder Hazel Squakin
Views: 16174 Aboriginal Education
The Civil War - A Waypoint in Military History (Lecture)
 
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Ranger Bill Hewitt examines the many influences the Civil War had upon future military history in this Gettysburg National MIlitary Park Winter Lecture.
Views: 18142 GettysburgNPS
Aboriginal Title and Provincial Regulation: The Impact of Tsilhqot'in Nation v BC
 
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In partnership with the Centre for Global Studies and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance, UVic Law presents this two-hour panel discussion and Continuing Legal Education (CLE) course on this case of national significance. Panelists include: Jay Nelson (General Counsel to the Tsilhqot'in Nation, Associate Counsel at Woodward & Company), Krista Robertson (Lawyer at JFK Law Corporation with expertise in Aboriginal Rights Law) and Dr. John Borrows (Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria).
Views: 7099 UVic Law
Professor Robert Miller: The Doctrine of Discovery and Manifest Destiny
 
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Official video archive of presentation by Professor Robert Miller at the Indigenous Peoples Forum on the Doctrine of Discovery March 23, 2012 at the Arizona State Capitol House of Representatives
Views: 16521 Tonatierra
Income Inequality: Evidence and Implications with Emmanuel Saez
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Top incomes represent a small share of the population but a very significant share of total income and total taxes paid. Emmanuel Saez, Professor of Economics and Director, Center for Equitable Growth, University of California, Berkeley presents evidence on income inequality gathered by a collective group of researchers in the World Top Incomes Database. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Council Lectures" [3/2013] [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 24689]
2014 Sol Kanee Lecture - Justice Murray Sinclair
 
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The Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul's College, University of Manitoba, is proud to present the Eleventh Annual Sol Kanee Lecture on International Peace and Justice. This year's guest lecturer was Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (www.trc.ca). Justice Sinclair addressed the question: What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? The lecture took place on Monday, September 29, 2014 at the University of Manitoba. 0:04 Opening Remarks and Welcome: Dr. Sean Byrne, Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul’s College 4:32 Greetings: Dr. Chris Adams, Rector, St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba 6:55 Introduction of Justice Murray Sinclair: Dr. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Native Studies, University of Manitoba 17:20 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 1 46:28 Video presentations – Justice Murray included a series of video interviews with residential school survivors as a part of his lecture 53:30 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 2 1:29:33 Question and Answer Period: Dr. Sean Byrne, Moderator 1:59:12 Acknowledgement Peace and Conflicts Studies students, Ms. Mary Anne Clarke and Ms. Jennifer Ham acknowledge and thank Justice Sinclair 2:01:18 Concluding Remarks: Dr. Sean Byrne For more information on this and other Mauro Centre events, please visit: www.facebook.com/maurocentre www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/mauro_centre/
Views: 1212 MauroCentre
Panel Discussion: Art and Reconciliation | Panel sur l’art et la réconciliation
 
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Learn more here: http://c.nac.ca/1RyKruc | En savoir Plus : http://c.nac.ca/1RyKwhw The recent landmark report by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada on the abuses at residential schools states that art has the extraordinary ability to heal. The National Arts Centre hosted a timely panel discussion on art in the context of reconciliation moderated by Dr. Marie Wilson, Commissioner Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, and featuring panelists Rachael Maza, acclaimed Australian theatre director of Jack Charles V The Crown (presented at the NAC), Joseph Boyden, author of the award-winning novels Three Day Road and The Orenda, and John Estacio, JUNO award nominated composer of I Lost My Talk, a new work inspired by the poem of Mi’kmaw elder Rita Joe. The panel discussion was introduced by The Right Honorable Joe Clark. (This is a livestream archive from January 14th, 2016) Dans le rapport historique de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada qui s’est penchée sur les abus commis dans les pensionnats autochtones, on peut lire que l’art a cette faculté extraordinaire de guérir. Le Centre national des Arts est l’hôte d’un panel où seront justement abordés les arts dans le contexte de la réconciliation. Marie Wilson, Ph.D., commissaire au sein de la Commission de vérité et réconciliation du Canada, agira comme modératrice de cet événement qui accueillera comme panélistes Rachael Maza, célèbre metteure en scène australienne qui a signé la production de Jack Charles V The Crown présentée au CNA, JosephBoyden, auteur des romans primés Three Day Road et The Orenda, et le compositeur John Estacio, cité pour un prix JUNO, à qui l’on doit I Lost My Talk, une nouvelle œuvre inspirée du poème éponyme de l’aînée mi’kmaq Rita Joe. Le très honorable Joe Clark ouvrira la discussion.
Views: 1457 National Arts Centre
Understanding the TRC Calls to Action
 
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March 23, 2016 Panel Discussion Re-Visioning Teacher Education: Responding to the TRC Calls-to-Action 2016 University of Manitoba
The Saskatoon Police Service - Never the Same Day Twice
 
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The Saskatoon Police Service offers career opportunities that are worth serious consideration. The city has a rapidly growing Aboriginal population and the service must reflect this change. As protectors and peacemakers, the role police play in any community is invaluable. The police service offers careers both on the front lines and in civilian support positions. For more information visit saskatoonpoliceservice.ca. ©2014 Saskatoon Police Service
Views: 13251 SaskatoonPolice
Is there a traditional perspective of Truth and Reconciliation?
 
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A presentation by Honourable Mr. Justice Murray Sinclair as part of the Indigenous Knowledge Seminar Series offered by Aboriginal Focus Programs, Extended Education, the University of Manitoba, held during an open house held at the University of Manitoba DOWNTOWN: Aboriginal Education Centre. Justice Sinclair is the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, established as an outcome of the 2006 Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. The University of Manitoba has made a commitment to helping the Commission achieve its objectives http://umanitoba.ca/visionary/human-rights.html. Justice Sinclair has served as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba since 1988 and the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba since 2001. Shortly after his appointment as Associate Chief Judge of the Provincial Court of Manitoba in 1988, he was appointed Co-Commissioner, along with Court of Queen's Bench Associate Chief Justice A.C. Hamilton, of Manitoba's Aboriginal Justice Inquiry. That inquiry looked into the treatment of Aboriginal people by the justice system and made more than 300 recommendations for change including the establishment of tribal courts. Justice Sinclair was born and raised on the Old St. Peter's Indian Reserve in the Selkirk area north of Winnipeg. He graduated from the University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law in 1979 and taught as an adjunct professor of Law as well as adjunct professor in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at the University of Manitoba. His Ojibway name is Mizanageezhik (One Who Speaks of Pictures in the Sky). He is a member of the traditional Midewiwin Society.
Dismantling the Doctrine of Discovery: The Road to Reconciliation Panel
 
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This panel discussion was held June 1st, 2015 at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission closing events in Ottawa, Canada. The Doctrine of Discovery was used as legal and moral justification for colonial dispossession of sovereign Indigenous Nations. Christian explorers claimed lands for their monarchs who could exploit the land, regardless of the original occupiers. To View Grand Chief Ed John's United Nation paper on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit: http://bit.ly/1LN1gfU For more information on the Doctrine of Discovery, visit:http://bit.ly/1LN1gfU
Views: 2183 CFSCVideo
Building Reconciliation: Universities Answering the TRC Calls to Action
 
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The University of Saskatchewan brought together university presidents and Aboriginal leaders from across Canada November 18-19, 2015 to discuss how universities can play a role in closing the Aboriginal education gap. The plenary event included remarks from TRC Commissioner Justice Murray Sinclair, Assembly of First Nations Chief Perry Bellegarde, Northwest Territories Deputy Premier Jackson Lafferty, Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations Chief Bobby Cameron, and Métis Nation Saskatchewan president Robert Doucette. More information is here: http://www.usask.ca/trc2015/
Views: 1035 Usask
Engaging Minds: Caroline Tait
 
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Caroline Tait - Aboriginal Health Researcher Faculty Researcher for the Indigenous Peoples' Health Research Centre.
Views: 863 uofsresearch
FNS - Elder Teachings by Napos
 
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This is an oral recording of Medicine Wheel teachings by Napos, Menominee Nation. The oral teachings are accompanied by video images and pictures. The oral teachings reflect a traditional First Nations worldview and including teachings on concept of "4" and the Seven Gifts as a way of living in the world.
Views: 2515 UW Green Bay
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes Audiobook by A. Conan Doyle | P1 of 3 | Unabridged full audiobook
 
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chapters: 0:30 | story 1- A Scandal in Bohemia 55:25 |story 2 - The Red-Headed League 1:54:12 | story 3 - A Case of Identity 2:37:11 | story 4 - The Boscombe Valley Mystery Best of Librivox :The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (version 4) Sir Arthur Conan DOYLE The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 12 short stories that were originally illustrated by Sidney Paget. These are the first set of short stories that were published and followed the publishing of his first 2 novels, A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of the Four. - Summary by David Clarke Genre(s): Crime & Mystery Fiction, Detective Fiction Best Librivox Audiobooks Our Custom URL : https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks Subscribe To Our Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AudiobookAudiobooks?sub_confirmation=1 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Audio Book Audiobooks All Rights Reserved. This is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org.
Views: 1173 Audio book Audiobooks
The Juneteenth Book Festival Symposium on Black Literature & Literacy
 
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A day-long symposium on Juneteenth, one of the oldest observances marking the end of the enslavement of African descendants in the United States. The holiday has been celebrated in Galveston, Texas, since June 19, 1865, when news of the Emancipation Proclamation first was announced in Texas. Today, Juneteenth commemorates African American freedom with an emphasis on education and literacy. The opened with a history of Juneteenth. Three panels followed on "The State of Black Literature," "The "Stakeholders of Black Literacy" and "Independent Artists: Our Journey as Storytellers of the African Diaspora." Speaker Biography: Hari Jones is curator of the African American Civil War Museum in Washington, D.C. Speaker Biography: Haki Madhubuti is founder of of Third World Press, the longest-running independent black-owned publishing company in the U.S. Speaker Biography: E. Ethelbert Miller is a literary activist, poet and editor. Speaker Biography: Nikki Woods is a social media consultant and senior producer of "The Tom Joyner Morning Show." Speaker Biography: Yanick Rice-Lam is a journalist, associate professor at Howard University and co-founder of FierceforBlackWomen.com, a digital health and fitness network. Speaker Biography: Brenda Greene is director of the National Black Writers Conference and executive director of the Center for Black Literature at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York. Speaker Biography: Bomani Armah is known as "Mr. Read a Book" and the "Poet with a Hip-Hop Style." Speaker Biography: Bahiyyah Muhammad is assistant professor of criminology at Howard University and founder of "Project Iron Kids," which educates and empowers children of incarcerated parents. Speaker Biography: Rahman Branch is former principal of Ballou High School in Washington, D.C., and the first executive director of the Office of African American Affairs in the Office of the Mayor of the District of Columbia. Speaker Biography: Gabriel "Asheru" Benn is an international hip-hop artist and co-founder of Educational Lyrics, which sponsors H.E.L.P, the Hip Hop Educational Literacy Program. Speaker Biography: Beverly East is an international forensic-document examiner and author. Speaker Biography: Hafiz F. Shabazz is adjunct assistant professor and director of the World Music Percussion Ensemble at Dartmouth College, where he developed the "Oral Tradition Musicianship" course and produced more than 85 major concerts. Speaker Biography: Haile Gerima is distinguished professor of film at Howard University and an independent Ethiopian filmmaker who produced and directed the 1993 film "Sankofa." For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7150
Views: 1967 LibraryOfCongress
Implementing the Vision: Chapter 4- Stepping into Governance
 
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A first for Canada, the Tripartite First Nations Health Plan calls on BC, Canada, and BC First Nations to work together to close the health gap. Drawing on the wisdom of our indigenous neighbours -This chapter outlines a vision for increased First Nations control over the design and delivery of health services.
Views: 5297 fnhealthcouncil
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part One)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies. This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
Think Indigenous 8 Micheal Linklater_March_19_2015
 
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Micheal Linklater, Program Coordinator for White Buffalo Youth Lodge
Views: 2954 Usask
Remembering the Children - Indian Residential Schools
 
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AFN National Chief Phil Fontaine speaks about the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconcilation Commission. (Remembering the Children: Aboriginal and Church Leaders' Tour, March 2, 2008, Gatineau, Canada.)
Views: 10885 Aabitaadibik
Behold, America! | Symposium | Part 5
 
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Patricia Kelly, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Critical Studies at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design in Vancouver, Canada Measuring Here and There, or the Decentralization of American Art When influential art critic and curator Lucy Lippard staged 955,000 in Vancouver, BC in January 1970, she was acknowledging the international aspirations and interconnectivity of much American conceptual art. Participating artists such as Robert Smithson, Douglas Huebler, and Sol LeWitt, had, by this time, well established practices concerned with mapping and relationality. Lippard's push towards decentralization signaled a broader desire among contemporary artists and critics to increase opportunities for sustained intellectual and creative inquiry, to understand art practice from a global (rather than regional) perspective, and to expand networks of like-minded artists across national borders in often unexpected and creative ways. Using this exhibition as a point of departure, this paper will explore the circulation of artists between the US and the West Coast of Canada in the late 60s and early 70s, and its potentially destabilizing effect on American art history. Conversation with James Luna & Michael Hatt, Ph.D. Dr. Hatt is Professor in the History of Art at the University of Warwick, England Wang Dang Doodle Encounters, or Representing the Indian, Then and Now James Luna's practice has focused on cross-cultural, multicultural, and current cultural issues in contemporary American Indian society. He will present his most recent installation, which opened last month at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Luna will be joined by Michael Hatt to discuss his work in relation to art history, the representation of Native Americans in the past, and the ways in which that history is presented to the public. Deborah Butterfield Deborah Butterfield is a major American sculptor whose subject since the 1970s has been the horse. Butterfield earned an MFA from the University of California, Davis, and is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, from such organizations as the National Endowment for the Arts. In this presentation, Butterfield will overview much of her career, from her college works to her current studio practice. Derrick Cartwright, Ph.D. Director of University Galleries and Professor of Practice, Art History at the University of San Diego Proliferating Participation: American Art Displays in Eras of Crisis Contemporary American museum culture is fraught with challenges. In the face of weakening public support, institutions today claim that they seek audience engagement as a key to maintaining relevance and achieving sustainability. This talk explores the ways that "participation" has often been held up as a virtue by American art exhibitions past and present. From Robert Henri's 1915 exhibition of Modern American Painting at the Panama California Exposition to ambitious projects, like Behold, America!, the stakes of encouraging new participatory practices have at once evolved and grown more urgent across the United States. www.TheSanDiegoMuseumofArt.org Video produced by Balboa Park Online Collaborative
House Job Growth and Energy Affordability Policy and Finance Committee  4/13/18
 
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00:53 - HF3988 (Layman) National Resources Research Institute academic and applied research funding provided, reports required, and money appropriated. 20:35 - HF3810 (Barr) Project Build Minnesota funding provided to encourage students to consider a career in the construction industry, and money appropriated. 43:50 - HF3519 (Anderson, P.) Alexandria Lake Area Sanitary District funding provided, and money appropriated. 49:41 - HF4179 (Mahoney) African Economic Development Solutions grant funding provided, and money appropriated. 1:04:05 - HF3284 (West) Modular home requirements clarified. 1:09:07 - HF3285 (West) Home park closing provisions modified. 1:14:58 - HF3807 (West) Manufactured home installer fees modified. 1:17:12 - HF4377 (Mahoney) East metropolitan area pilot project funding provided, reports required, and money appropriated. 1:51:05 - HF3003 (Bahr) Carbon-free energy standard established, definition modified, and conforming changes made. 2;15;45 - HF3865 (Clark) Minneapolis; East Phillips Neighborhood Institute indoor urban farming project funding provided, and money appropriated. Runs 3 hours, 8 minutes. * Connect with House Public Information Services: www.house.mn/hinfo/hinfo.asp * Find Minnesota House of Representatives news and updates at Session Daily: www.house.mn/sessiondaily/ *Connect with the Minnesota House of Representatives: www.house.mn
Views: 126 MNHouseInfo
THE 5TH ANNUAL WILLIAM WATERS SYMPOSIUM ON URBAN EDUCATION
 
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BEYOND THE THREE R'S: Troubling Reconciliation, Restitution, & Resurgence A Conversation for Aboriginal and Non-Aboriginal Educators April 17, 2013 OISE Auditorium KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Ellen Gabriel Taiaiake Alfred Susan D. Dion This symposium provides an opportunity to hear and learn from three Aboriginal scholars and activists. Each keynote brings a particular knowledge about the fundamental issues connected to teaching and learning within an anti-colonial framework. Grounding the current context within an historical perspective, the speakers will link their analyses to the interconnectedness of theory and practice.
Views: 1683 OISE UofT
Battle of Monte Cassino | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Battle of Monte Cassino Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Battle of Monte Cassino (also known as the Battle for Rome and the Battle for Cassino) was a costly series of four assaults by the Allies against the Winter Line in Italy held by Axis forces during the Italian Campaign of World War II. The intention was a breakthrough to Rome. At the beginning of 1944, the western half of the Winter Line was being anchored by Germans holding the Rapido-Gari, Liri and Garigliano valleys and some of the surrounding peaks and ridges. Together, these features formed the Gustav Line. Monte Cassino, a historic hilltop abbey founded in AD 529 by Benedict of Nursia, dominated the nearby town of Cassino and the entrances to the Liri and Rapido valleys. Lying in a protected historic zone, it had been left unoccupied by the Germans, although they manned some positions set into the steep slopes below the abbey's walls. Repeated pinpoint artillery attacks on Allied assault troops caused their leaders to conclude the abbey was being used by the Germans as an observation post, at the least. Fears escalated along with casualties and in spite of a lack of clear evidence, it was marked for destruction. On 15 February American bombers dropped 1,400 tons of high explosives, creating widespread damage. The raid failed to achieve its objective, as German paratroopers occupied the rubble and established excellent defensive positions amid the ruins. Between 17 January and 18 May, Monte Cassino and the Gustav defences were assaulted four times by Allied troops, the last involving twenty divisions attacking along a twenty-mile front. The German defenders were finally driven from their positions, but at a high cost. The capture of Monte Cassino resulted in 55,000 Allied casualties, with German losses being far fewer, estimated at around 20,000 killed and wounded.
Views: 20 wikipedia tts
Street View's New Look on Google Maps Australia
 
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Check out the new experience of Street View on Google Maps. Learn the new ways to enter Street View, look at our full screen mode, navigate through driving directions, and more. Street View is a feature of Google Maps that allows you to quickly and easily view and navigate high-resolution, 360 degree street level images of various cities in Australia. See at http://maps.google.com.au/streetview
Views: 943413 Google
Wyoming
 
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Wyoming i/waɪˈoʊmɪŋ/ is a state in the mountain region of the Western United States. Wyoming is the 10th most extensive, but the least populous and the second least densely populated of the 50 United States. The western two thirds of the state is covered mostly with the mountain ranges and rangelands in the foothills of the Eastern Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie known as the High Plains. Cheyenne is the capital and the most populous city in Wyoming, with a population of 91,738 in the metropolitan area . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 85 encyclopediacc
Wyoming | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Wyoming Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Wyoming ( (listen)) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous, and the second most sparsely populated state in the country. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho and Montana. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver. Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with an estimated population of 63,335 in 2015.The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains. Almost half of the land in Wyoming is owned by the U.S. government, leading Wyoming to rank sixth by area and fifth by proportion of a state's land owned by the federal government. Federal lands include two national parks—Grand Teton and Yellowstone—two national recreation areas, two national monuments, several national forests, historic sites, fish hatcheries, and wildlife refuges. Original inhabitants of the region include the Crow, Arapaho, Lakota, and Shoshone. Southwestern Wyoming was in the Spanish Empire and then Mexican territory until it was ceded to the United States in 1848 at the end of the Mexican–American War. The region acquired the name Wyoming when a bill was introduced to the U.S. Congress in 1865 to provide a "temporary government for the territory of Wyoming". The name was used earlier for the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, and is derived from the Munsee word xwé:wamənk, meaning "at the big river flat".The main drivers of Wyoming's economy are mineral extraction—mostly coal, oil, natural gas, and trona—and tourism. Agricultural commodities include livestock (beef), hay, sugar beets, grain (wheat and barley), and wool. The climate is semi-arid and continental, drier and windier than the rest of the U.S., with greater temperature extremes. Wyoming has been a politically conservative state since the 1950s, with the Republican Party candidate winning every presidential election except 1964.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
2015 Veterans Symposium - Keynote
 
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The University of Missouri School of Law presents the 2015 Veterans Clinic Symposium - Traumatic Brain Injury: Lessons Learned from Our Nation’s Athletes and Military. _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Keynote Presentation: The Aftermath of Traumatic Brain Injury in the War Zone Dr. Susan Okie Former Medical Reporter and National Science Editor The Washington Post _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Overview: On May 19, 2005, the New England Journal of Medicine published Dr. Susan Okie’s article, “ Traumatic Brain Injury in the War Zone,” which reported on the case of Sgt. David Emme, who was severely brain-injured by an improvised explosive device (IED) as part of a convoy transporting Iraqi volunteers for military training. Sgt. Emme was one of 450 service members treated at Walter Reed from 2003 to 2005 for traumatic brain injury (TBI). More than 30,000 service members suffer from TBI, with an estimated economic cost of $76.5 billion. Kansas City Chiefs player Javon Belcher shot and killed his girlfriend before killing himself on December 1, 2012. CNN reported that pathology reports found Belcher suffered from brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE was found in the brains of 87 of 91 deceased NFL players who donated their bodies for research, according to a study released on September 18, 2015. As explained by Dr. Ann McKee, one of the doctors involved in the study, this is not a matter of sensationalizing an issue to create controversy for football fans or the NFL, “this is a very real disease.” Evidence of CTE has been found in the brains of veterans, just as it has been found in NFL players. The Veterans Clinic at the University of Missouri School of Law is pleased to present its second annual symposium focusing on the legal and practical issues arising from traumatic brain injury, a very real concern for athletes and our military. Copyright Information: http://www.missouri.edu/copyright.php © 2015 - Curators of the University of Missouri
Views: 211 MizzouLaw
Wyoming | Wikipedia audio article
 
44:28
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Wyoming Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Wyoming ( (listen)) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous, and the second most sparsely populated state in the country. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho and Montana. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver. Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with an estimated population of 63,335 in 2015.The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains. Almost half of the land in Wyoming is owned by the U.S. government, leading Wyoming to rank sixth by area and fifth by proportion of a state's land owned by the federal government. Federal lands include two national parks—Grand Teton and Yellowstone—two national recreation areas, two national monuments, several national forests, historic sites, fish hatcheries, and wildlife refuges. Original inhabitants of the region include the Crow, Arapaho, Lakota, and Shoshone. Southwestern Wyoming was in the Spanish Empire and then Mexican territory until it was ceded to the United States in 1848 at the end of the Mexican–American War. The region acquired the name Wyoming when a bill was introduced to the U.S. Congress in 1865 to provide a "temporary government for the territory of Wyoming". The name was used earlier for the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, and is derived from the Munsee word xwé:wamənk, meaning "at the big river flat".The main drivers of Wyoming's economy are mineral extraction—mostly coal, oil, natural gas, and trona—and tourism. Agricultural commodities include livestock (beef), hay, sugar beets, grain (wheat and barley), and wool. The climate is semi-arid and continental, drier and windier than the rest of the U.S., with greater temperature extremes. Wyoming has been a politically conservative state since the 1950s, with the Republican Party candidate winning every presidential election except 1964.
Views: 12 wikipedia tts
Banshee Hillclimb
 
00:53
me hillclimbing. filmed with the GoPro naked
Views: 316 JokurAtkinson
Wyoming | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyoming 00:02:48 1 Geography 00:02:57 1.1 Climate 00:06:08 1.2 Location and size 00:08:02 1.3 Natural landforms 00:08:11 1.3.1 Mountain ranges 00:10:49 1.3.2 Islands 00:11:14 1.4 Regions and administrative divisions 00:11:24 1.4.1 Counties 00:11:56 1.4.2 Cities and towns 00:12:20 1.4.3 Metropolitan areas 00:12:57 1.4.4 Wind River Indian Reservation 00:14:23 1.4.5 Public lands 00:17:12 2 History 00:22:14 3 Demographics 00:22:24 3.1 Population 00:26:01 3.2 Birth data 00:26:31 4 Government and politics 00:26:41 4.1 State government 00:27:40 4.2 Judicial system 00:29:23 4.3 Political history 00:31:54 4.4 Voter registration 00:32:08 4.4.1 Voter registration by county 00:32:29 5 Culture 00:32:37 5.1 Languages 00:33:59 5.2 Religion 00:35:16 5.3 Sports 00:36:11 5.4 State symbols 00:37:17 6 Economy and infrastructure 00:40:18 6.1 Mineral and energy production 00:44:00 6.2 Taxes 00:47:30 6.3 Transportation 00:50:08 7 Education 00:50:52 7.1 Higher education 00:51:49 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8815370571960777 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Wyoming ( (listen)) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous, and the second most sparsely populated state in the country. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho and Montana. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver. Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with an estimated population of 63,335 in 2015.The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains. Almost half of the land in Wyoming is owned by the U.S. government, leading Wyoming to rank sixth by area and fifth by proportion of a state's land owned by the federal government. Federal lands include two national parks—Grand Teton and Yellowstone—two national recreation areas, two national monuments, several national forests, historic sites, fish hatcheries, and wildlife refuges. Original inhabitants of the region include the Crow, Arapaho, Lakota, and Shoshone. Southwestern Wyoming was in the Spanish Empire and then Mexican territory until it was ceded to the United States in 1848 at the end of the Mexican–American War. The region acquired the name Wyoming when a bill was introduced to the U.S. Congress in 1865 to provide a "temporary government for the territory of Wyoming". The name was used earlier for the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, and is derived from the Munsee word xwé:wamənk, meaning "at the big river flat".The main drivers of Wyoming's economy are mineral extraction—mostly coal, oil, natural gas, and trona—and tourism. Agricultural commodities include livestock (beef), hay, sugar beets, grain (wheat and barley), and wool. The climate is semi-arid and continental, drier and windier than the rest of the U.S., with greater temperature extremes. Wyoming has been a politically conservative state since the 1950s, with the Republican Party candidate winning every presidential election except 1964.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Career Conversations: Discovering Careers That Travel
 
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An expert panel sat down to discuss the careers with the highest potential for globetrotting. Participating Panelists *Ian Lumb Bright Evangelist, Bright Computing Introduction: 0:00:03, 0:03:44 Family?: 0:14:31 Bilingual?: 0:19:57, 0:24:06 Jet Lag?: 0:28:37 Travel Career?: 0:34:34 Fall out of love?: 0:36:24 Guide?: 0:41:04 Reaching Home?: 0:49:33 *Guido D'Elia Flight Attendant, Air Canada Introduction 0:00:50, 0:06:15 Family?: 0:12:53 Advice?: 0:16:10 Biligual?: 0:23:10 Jet Lag?: 0:27:50, 0:30:00 Travel Career?: 0:31:06 Fall out of love?: 0:39:20 Guide?: 0:47:38 Reaching Home?: 0:52:21 *Rohini Chatrath International Recruitment Officer, York University Introduction 0:01:37, 0:07:46 Family?: 0:11:49 Biligual?: 0:20:57 Jet Lag?: 0:26:13 Travel Career?: 0:31:53 Fall out of love?: 0:38:39 Guide?: 0:46:46 Reaching Home?: 0:51:56 * Military Professional Introduction 0:02:31, 0:08:27 Family?: 0:10:02, 0:15:22 Biligual?: 0:21:43, 0:23:27 Jet Lag?: 0:26:40 Travel Career?: 0:33:03 Fall out of love?: 0:37:30 Guide?: 0:44:43 Reaching Home?: 0:50:38 Q&A? 1. How does your family react to your travel? 0:10:03 2. Guido, what advice do you have for aspiring flight attendants? 0:16:13 3. How important is speaking another language to your job? 0:19:54 4. How do you best deal with frequently shifting time zones? 0:26:11 5. What influenced your decision to make travel part of your career? 0:31:04 6. Is it a possibility that within your careers you will reach a point where you no longer want to travel? 0:36:23 7. How essential is it to have a guide or a local when you land in a new country? 0:41:04 8. With all your extended travel, how can you possibly maintain a strong networking base in your home country? 0:49:33 Recorded: Wednesday, February 5, 2014 in the Harry Crowe Room (109 Atkinson College) at York University. For more info: http://www.yorku.ca/careers/students/jobsearchpanels/index.htm
Omaha, Nebraska | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Omaha, Nebraska 00:05:23 1 History 00:07:22 1.1 Pioneer Omaha 00:09:34 1.2 19th century 00:13:22 1.3 20th century 00:20:48 1.4 21st century 00:23:36 2 Geography 00:26:46 2.1 Neighborhoods 00:28:34 2.2 Landmark preservation 00:30:06 2.3 Climate 00:31:49 3 Demographics 00:31:58 3.1 2010 census 00:34:21 3.2 2000 census 00:36:08 3.3 People 00:43:07 3.4 Latinos in Omaha 00:43:17 4 Economy 00:44:58 4.1 Top employers 00:45:12 4.2 Tourism 00:46:37 5 Culture 00:48:05 5.1 Henry Doorly Zoo 00:48:41 5.2 Old Market 00:50:16 5.3 Music 00:53:18 5.4 Popular culture 00:55:56 6 Sports and recreation 00:59:09 6.1 Recreation 01:00:32 7 Government and politics 01:03:20 7.1 Crime 01:05:37 8 Education 01:08:21 9 Media 01:09:48 10 Infrastructure 01:11:42 10.1 Transportation 01:15:55 11 Notable people 01:16:04 12 Sister cities 01:16:33 13 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Omaha ( OH-mə-hah) is the largest city in the state of Nebraska and the county seat of Douglas County. Omaha is located in the Midwestern United States on the Missouri River, about 10 miles (15 km) north of the mouth of the Platte River. Omaha is the anchor of the Omaha-Council Bluffs metropolitan area, which includes Council Bluffs, Iowa, across the Missouri River from Omaha. According to the 2010 census, Omaha's population was 408,958, having increased to 466,893 as of the 2017 estimate. This makes Omaha the nation's 40th-largest city. Including its suburbs, Omaha formed the 60th-largest metropolitan area in the United States in 2013, with an estimated population of 895,151 residing in eight counties. The Omaha-Council Bluffs-Fremont, Nebraska-IA Combined Statistical Area is 931,667, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's 2013 estimate. Nearly 1.3 million people reside within the Greater Omaha area, comprising a 50 miles (80 kilometers) radius of Downtown Omaha, the city's center. Omaha's pioneer period began in 1854, when the city was founded by speculators from neighboring Council Bluffs, Iowa. The city was founded along the Missouri River, and a crossing called Lone Tree Ferry earned the city its nickname, the "Gateway to the West". Omaha introduced this new West to the world in 1898, when it played host to the World's Fair, dubbed the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. During the 19th century, Omaha's central location in the United States spurred the city to become an important national transportation hub. Throughout the rest of the 19th century, the transportation and jobbing sectors were important in the city, along with its railroads and breweries. In the 20th century, the Omaha Stockyards, once the world's largest, and its meatpacking plants gained international prominence. Today, Omaha is the home to the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies: mega-conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway; one of the world's largest construction companies, Kiewit Corporation; insurance and financial firm Mutual of Omaha; and the United States' largest railroad operator, Union Pacific Corporation. Berkshire Hathaway is headed by local investor Warren Buffett, one of the richest people in the world, according to a decade's worth of Forbes Magazine rankings, some of which have ranked him as high as No. 1. Omaha is also the home to five Fortune 1000 headquarters: Green Plains Renewable Energy, TD Ameritrade, Valmont Industries, Werner Enterprises, and West Corporation. Also headquartered in Omaha are First National Bank of Omaha, the largest privately held bank in the United States; three of the nation's largest 10 architecture/engineering firms: DLR Group, HDR, Inc., and Leo A Daly; the Gallup Organization, of Gallup Poll fame; and its riverfront Gallup University. Enron began in Omaha as Northern Natural Gas in 1930, before taking over a smaller Houston company in 1985 to form InterNorth, which Kenneth Lay moved permanently to Houston, in 1987. First Data, another Fortune 500 company, was founded in Omaha in 1971 and headquartered there until the late 90's. ConAgra Brand ...
Views: 55 wikipedia tts
Wyoming | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyoming 00:02:25 1 Geography 00:02:34 1.1 Climate 00:05:21 1.2 Location and size 00:07:01 1.3 Natural landforms 00:07:10 1.3.1 Mountain ranges 00:09:27 1.3.2 Islands 00:09:51 1.4 Regions and administrative divisions 00:10:00 1.4.1 Counties 00:10:29 1.4.2 Cities and towns 00:10:51 1.4.3 Metropolitan areas 00:11:24 1.4.4 Wind River Indian Reservation 00:12:39 1.4.5 Public lands 00:15:08 2 History 00:19:30 3 Demographics 00:19:39 3.1 Population 00:22:50 3.2 Birth data 00:23:17 4 Government and politics 00:23:27 4.1 State government 00:24:19 4.2 Judicial system 00:25:50 4.3 Political history 00:28:01 4.4 Voter registration 00:28:13 4.4.1 Voter registration by county 00:28:32 5 Culture 00:28:41 5.1 Languages 00:29:53 5.2 Religion 00:31:02 5.3 Sports 00:31:50 5.4 State symbols 00:32:50 6 Economy and infrastructure 00:35:28 6.1 Mineral and energy production 00:38:40 6.2 Taxes 00:41:41 6.3 Transportation 00:43:59 7 Education 00:44:38 7.1 Higher education 00:45:29 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Wyoming ( (listen)) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous, and the second most sparsely populated state in the country. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho and Montana. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver. Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with an estimated population of 63,335 in 2015.The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains. Almost half of the land in Wyoming is owned by the U.S. government, leading Wyoming to rank sixth by area and fifth by proportion of a state's land owned by the federal government. Federal lands include two national parks—Grand Teton and Yellowstone—two national recreation areas, two national monuments, several national forests, historic sites, fish hatcheries, and wildlife refuges. Original inhabitants of the region include the Crow, Arapaho, Lakota, and Shoshone. Southwestern Wyoming was in the Spanish Empire and then Mexican territory until it was ceded to the United States in 1848 at the end of the Mexican–American War. The region acquired the name Wyoming when a bill was introduced to the U.S. Congress in 1865 to provide a "temporary government for the territory of Wyoming". The name was used earlier for the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, and is derived from the Munsee word xwé:wamənk, meaning "at the big river flat".The main drivers of Wyoming's economy are mineral extraction—mostly coal, oil, natural gas, and trona—and tourism. Agricultural commodities include livestock (beef), hay, sugar beets, grain (wheat and barley), and wool. The climate is semi-arid and continental, drier and windier than the rest of the U.S., with greater temperature extremes. Wyoming has been a politically conservative state since the 1950s, with the Republican Party candidate winning every presidential election except 1964.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
University of California | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: University of California Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the US state of California. Under the California Master Plan for Higher Education, the University of California is a part of the state's three-system public higher education plan, which also includes the California State University system and the California Community Colleges System. The University of California was founded on March 23, 1868, and operated temporarily in Oakland before moving to its new campus in Berkeley in 1873. In March 1951, the University of California began its reorganization, and in 1952 it became separated as a "university system" from the University of California, Berkeley, with Robert Gordon Sproul being the first system-wide President and Clark Kerr being the first Chancellor of UC Berkeley. Today, governed by a semi-autonomous Board of Regents, the University of California has 10 campuses, a combined student body of 251,700 students, 21,200 faculty members, 144,000 staff members and over 1.86 million living alumni as of October 2016. Its tenth and newest campus in Merced opened in fall 2005. Nine campuses enroll both undergraduate and graduate students; one campus, UC San Francisco, enrolls only graduate and professional students in the medical and health sciences. In addition, the UC Hastings College of Law, located in San Francisco, is legally affiliated with UC, but other than sharing its name is entirely autonomous from the rest of the system. The University of California also manages or co-manages three national laboratories for the US Department of Energy: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).Collectively, the colleges, institutions, and alumni of the University of California make it the most comprehensive and advanced postsecondary educational system in the world, responsible for nearly US$50 billion per year of economic impact. UC campuses have large numbers of distinguished faculty in almost every academic discipline, with UC faculty and researchers having won at least 62 Nobel Prizes as of 2017.
Views: 10 wikipedia tts
Harvest of Hope: 8 Panel Discussion
 
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In the spirit of Thanksgiving, this timely and insightful forum moderated by Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche) focuses on topical issues of reconciliation and highlights national apologies made to Native peoples. The symposium covers the eloquent apology issued in June 2008 by the Canadian government for the abuse and cultural loss suffered by Aboriginal peoples in Canada's residential schools. It includes a presentation on the Native American Apology Resolution recently passed in the United States Senate as well as an examination of reconciliation efforts in Guatemala. A wrap-up speaker considers the issues involved in apologies and reconciliation processes in a broad scope. Concluding with panel discussion and questions from the audience, Harvest of Hope seeks a deeper, more inclusive understanding of our national narratives and the experiences of the Native peoples of the Americas. In Part 8, Kevin Gover moderates a panel discussion with the presenters. This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.This symposium took place in the Rasmuson Theater of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC on November 13, 2008.
Views: 950 SmithsonianNMAI
Content and Analysis in Native Art Part 1 of 2
 
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Content and Analysis in Native Art: Moving Past Form and Function. This video is part 1 of 2. For part 2, visit: http://youtu.be/uZQO8l7GWmc Speakers: Lara Evans, Cherokee Nation, art historian, art history faculty, Institute of American Indian Arts Kade Twist, Cherokee Nation, mixed media artist Frank Buffalo Hyde, Onondaga, painter Moderator: Carolyn Kastner, Curator, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum (moderator) Many contemporary Native artists have expressed concern that their work is often examined in terms of materials, process, and function, while a more in-depth content analysis is overlooked. This panel discussion looks at the issue and its history. This panel discussion was part of the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research's 2014 Speaker Series, Art in Flux, which was dedicated to discussing key issues and programs affecting artists and art institutions today. Art in Flux was developed by the School for Advanced Research with the help of Professor Lara Evans of the Institute of American Indian Arts. Events took place at SAR and the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. This event was recorded on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.
Engaging Youth With Indigenous Materials in Libraries and Classrooms
 
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"Assessing and incorporating teaching and learning resources by and about First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples is critical for librarians, educators and parents. Awareness of diverse epistemologies, notions of cultural authenticity and historical accuracy, and the influence of colonialism, are essential when considering books, films and interactive media for library and classroom collections. This panel will address challenges facing Indigenous and non-Indigenous librarians, educators and parents when drawing upon materials representing Indigenous peoples and cultures. They will offer insights about such issues as cultural appropriation, stereotypes, addressing colonialism and what to do with dated resources. This session is ideal for teacher candidates, classroom teachers, teacher-librarians, youth librarians and parents. Convener: Jo-Anne Naslund, UBC Education Library Moderator: Lisa P. Nathan, Assistant Professor and Coordinator of the First Nations Curriculum Concentration, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies Panelists: Debra Martel, Associate Director, First Nations House of Learning; Jan Hare, Associate Professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education; Allison Taylor-McBryde, Adjunct Professor, School of Library, Archival and Information Studies."
The Intersection of Research Library Aspirations ad Copyright Challenges (2008) - James Neal
 
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James Neal is currently the Vice President for Information Services and University Librarian at Columbia University. He is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences, and is a consultant and published author, with a focus in the areas of scholarly communication, intellectual property, digital library programs, organizational change and human resource development.
Wyoming | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Wyoming 00:02:25 1 Geography 00:02:34 1.1 Climate 00:05:20 1.2 Location and size 00:07:00 1.3 Natural landforms 00:07:09 1.3.1 Mountain ranges 00:09:26 1.3.2 Islands 00:09:49 1.4 Regions and administrative divisions 00:09:59 1.4.1 Counties 00:10:27 1.4.2 Cities and towns 00:10:49 1.4.3 Metropolitan areas 00:11:22 1.4.4 Wind River Indian Reservation 00:12:37 1.4.5 Public lands 00:15:06 2 History 00:19:27 3 Demographics 00:19:36 3.1 Population 00:22:45 3.2 Birth data 00:23:12 4 Government and politics 00:23:22 4.1 State government 00:24:14 4.2 Judicial system 00:25:45 4.3 Political history 00:27:55 4.4 Voter registration 00:28:08 4.4.1 Voter registration by county 00:28:27 5 Culture 00:28:36 5.1 Languages 00:29:47 5.2 Religion 00:30:55 5.3 Sports 00:31:44 5.4 State symbols 00:32:42 6 Economy and infrastructure 00:35:19 6.1 Mineral and energy production 00:38:31 6.2 Taxes 00:41:32 6.3 Transportation 00:43:48 7 Education 00:44:28 7.1 Higher education 00:45:18 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Wyoming ( (listen)) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous, and the second most sparsely populated state in the country. Wyoming is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho and Montana. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver. Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with an estimated population of 63,335 in 2015.The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains. Almost half of the land in Wyoming is owned by the U.S. government, leading Wyoming to rank sixth by area and fifth by proportion of a state's land owned by the federal government. Federal lands include two national parks—Grand Teton and Yellowstone—two national recreation areas, two national monuments, several national forests, historic sites, fish hatcheries, and wildlife refuges. Original inhabitants of the region include the Crow, Arapaho, Lakota, and Shoshone. Southwestern Wyoming was in the Spanish Empire and then Mexican territory until it was ceded to the United States in 1848 at the end of the Mexican–American War. The region acquired the name Wyoming when a bill was introduced to the U.S. Congress in 1865 to provide a "temporary government for the territory of Wyoming". The name was used earlier for the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania, and is derived from the Munsee word xwé:wamənk, meaning "at the big river flat".The main drivers of Wyoming's economy are mineral extraction—mostly coal, oil, natural gas, and trona—and tourism. Agricultural commodities include livestock (beef), hay, sugar beets, grain (wheat and barley), and wool. The climate is semi-arid and continental, drier and windier than the rest of the U.S., with greater temperature extremes. Wyoming has been a politically conservative state since the 1950s, with the Republican Party candidate winning every presidential election except 1964.
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Formal 12/11/12 Session - Norfolk City Council
 
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21:40 PH-1 Series 2012 Wastewater System Revenue Bond Issuance 21:44 PH-2 Series 2012 Water System Revenue Bond Issuance 22:15 PH-3 Lease Agreement between the City of Norfolk and the Garden of Hope, Inc. -- Stanhope House 22:52 PH-4 Sale of Land from the City of Norfolk to the Hampton Roads Sanitation District located along the Southside of the VIP Treatment Plant in Lamberts Point. 23:30 PH-5 Sale of City Owned Property Located at 912 -- 944 W. 21st Street for the Development of Commercial Office and Retail Space 01:12:15 CONSENT ITEMS 01:12:28 R-1 Amend the General Plan, Change of Zoning - 6820 North Military Highway - Potter's House 01:13:44 R-2 Special Exception for an Eating and Drinking Establishment at 5601 East Virginia Beach Boulevard -- Sawasdee Thai Cuisine 01:14:05 R-3 Special Exception for an Entertainment Establishment at 4820 Hampton Boulevard -- Cancun Burrito Bar 01:14:38 R-4 Special Exception to operate a Used Merchandise Establishment at 415 North Military Highway -- Best Thrift 01:15:36 R-5 Allows construction and operation of a Commercial Drive- Through and bring the site into zoning compliance regarding the current practices of operating 24-hours and selling alcoholic beverages for off-premises consumption @ 230 East Little Creek Road -- Farm Fresh 01:18:34 R-6 Special Exception to operate an Entertainment Establishment with Alcoholic Beverages at 330West 22nd Street, Suite 104 and 105 -- Sassi Cakes and Sweets 01:18:18 R-7 Special Exception for Off-Lot Parking located at 4396 Pretty Lake Avenue -- East Beach Company 01:19:18 R-8 For an amendment to a previously granted Special Exception to operate an Entertainment Establishment at 1309 Raleigh Avenue -- Smartmouth Brewing 01:19:40 R-9 For an amendment to a previously granted Special Exception for an Eating and Drinking Establishment at 738 West 22nd Street, Suites 7-9 -- La Bella in Ghent 01:20:05 R-10 Encroachment Agreement for Outdoor Dining -- 436 Granby Street 01:20:30VR-11 Purchase and Sale Agreement for the Acquisition of Properties Located at 317 E. Little Creek Road, 334 Fort Worth Avenue and 338 Fort Worth Avenue 01:21:15 R-12 Purchase and Sale Agreement for the Acquisition of Property Located at 985 Ballentine Boulevard 01:22:42 R-13 Revocable License Agreement for the use of City-Owned Property Located at 1188 Lance Road 01:23:05 R-14 Authorization to Issue General Obligation Refunding Bonds Through December 31, 2013. 01:23:30 R-15 Authorization to Issue Water Revenue Refunding Bonds Through December 31, 2013 01:23:55 R-16 General Obligation Wastewater Bonds Interest Rate Reductions 01:25:28 R-17 Encroach into the right-of-way of the 3700 block of Shumadine Road with an organic and communal style garden by Daniel Powers and Shared Technologies 01:25:52 R-18 Ordinance -- 192 SF Permanent Utility Easement from WBG Financial Investment & Capital, LLC 01:26:16 R-19 Ordinance -- 323.06 SF Permanent Utility Easement from WBG Financial Investment & Capital, LLC 01:26:45 R-20 Accepting a Grant Award from the Bureau of Justice Assistance for Fiscal Year 2012 State Criminal Alien Assistance Program 01:27:12 R-21 Universal Service Fund E-Rate Grant Program 01:27:43 R-22 Accept the FY2012 Bulletproof Vests Program Grant for $6,677.07 from the U.S. Department of Justice 01:28:21 R-23 Firehouse Subs Public Safety Foundation Grant 01:29:30 R-24 FEMA Home Elevation Project 01:30:10 R-25 Acquisition of a Portion of Property at 358 Mowbray Arch owned by Eastern Virginia Medical School 01:30:40 R-26 Resolution Approving a Revenue Bond Issuance by the Economic Development Authority of the City of Norfolk for the benefit of the Bauer Real Estate, Inc. (Bauer Compressors, Inc.) 01:31:52 R-27 2009 Hampton Roads Urban Area Security Initiative 01:32:25 R-28 Attucks Theatre Conveyance to City of Norfolk 01:24:50 R-29 FY 2013 Budget Ordinance: Additional appropriation for Norfolk Public Schools (NPS) from NPS FY 2012 surplus 01:34:41 R-30 Compensation Ordinance Amendment -- Sheriff's Pay 01:35:05 R-31 FY 2013 Budget Ordinance: Additional appropriation for Norfolk Public Schools(NPS) from NPS FY 2012 surplus 01:35:54 R-32 This ordinance will cancel nine (9) regular City Council meetings for calendar year 2013 See the most current formal agenda online here: http://www.norfolk.gov/council_members/CouncilAgenda/docket.htm See previous formal meeting minutes here: http://www.norfolk.gov/City_Hall/minutesCC.asp See previous informal / work session minutes here: http://www.norfolk.gov/City_Hall/informal_minutescc.asp City Council and Clerk's office contact phone # list is here (where residents can comment): http://www.norfolk.gov/City_Hall/ContactInfoCC.asp
Views: 490 NorfolkTV
Missouri River | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Missouri River Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Missouri River is the longest river in North America. Rising in the Rocky Mountains of western Montana, the Missouri flows east and south for 2,341 miles (3,767 km) before entering the Mississippi River north of St. Louis, Missouri. The river takes drainage from a sparsely populated, semi-arid watershed of more than half a million square miles (1,300,000 km2), which includes parts of ten U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. When combined with the lower Mississippi River, it forms the world's fourth longest river system.For over 12,000 years, people have depended on the Missouri River and its tributaries as a source of sustenance and transportation. More than ten major groups of Native Americans populated the watershed, most leading a nomadic lifestyle and dependent on enormous bison herds that once roamed through the Great Plains. The first Europeans encountered the river in the late seventeenth century, and the region passed through Spanish and French hands before finally becoming part of the United States through the Louisiana Purchase. The Missouri was long believed to be part of the Northwest Passage – a water route from the Atlantic to the Pacific – but when Lewis and Clark became the first to travel the river's entire length, they confirmed the mythical pathway to be no more than a legend. The Missouri River was one of the main routes for the westward expansion of the United States during the 19th century. The growth of the fur trade in the early 19th century laid much of the groundwork as trappers explored the region and blazed trails. Pioneers headed west en masse beginning in the 1830s, first by covered wagon, then by the growing numbers of steamboats entering service on the river. Former Native American lands in the watershed were taken over by settlers, leading to some of the most longstanding and violent wars against indigenous peoples in American history. During the 20th century, the Missouri River basin was extensively developed for irrigation, flood control and the generation of hydroelectric power. Fifteen dams impound the main stem of the river, with hundreds more on tributaries. Meanders have been cut and the river channelized to improve navigation, reducing its length by almost 200 miles (320 km) from pre-development times. Although the lower Missouri valley is now a populous and highly productive agricultural and industrial region, heavy development has taken its toll on wildlife and fish populations as well as water quality.
Views: 37 wikipedia tts