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The Other Explosion You Should Know About
 
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Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/DonateEONS Fossils found around the world suggest that multi-cellular life was not only present before the Cambrian Explosion, it was much more elaborate and diverse than anyone thought. This is the story of the sudden burst of diversity that marked the dawn of truly complex life on our planet. Thanks to Franz Anthony and Studio 252mya for their illustrations. You can find more of Franz's work here: https://252mya.com/gallery/franz-anthony Thanks as always to Nobu Tamura for allowing us to use his wonderful paleoart: http://spinops.blogspot.com/ Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to follow Eons elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/eonsshow Twitter - https://twitter.com/eonsshow Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/eonsshow/ References: http://www.stratigraphy.org/gssp/ediacaran.pdf http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/vendian/ediacaran.php http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/10/e1500800.full http://burgess-shale.rom.on.ca/en/science/origin/03-enigmatic-edicarans.php http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/vendian/ediacara.html https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0708336105 http://science.sciencemag.org/content/305/5687/1141.full http://science.sciencemag.org/content/319/5859/81.full http://www.pnas.org/content/111/36/13122.full http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1793/20141202 http://www.pnas.org/content/97/13/6947.full
Views: 459522 PBS Eons
Ediacara Biota (In Our Time)
 
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Melvyn Bragg and guests Martin Brasier, Richard Corfield and Rachel Wood discuss the Ediacara Biota, the Precambrian life forms which vanished 542 million years ago, and whose discovery proved Darwin right in a way he never imagined. Darwin was convinced that there must have been life before the Cambrian era, but he didn't think it was possible for fossils like the Ediacara to have been preserved. These sea-bed organisms were first unearthed in the 19th century, but were only recognised as Precambrian in the mid-20th century. This was an astonishing discovery. Ever since, scientists have been working to determine its significance. Were the Ediacara the earliest forms of animal life? Or were they a Darwinian dead end? Either way, it is argued, they reveal some of the secrets of the workings of evolution. Richard Corfield is Senior Lecturer in Earth Sciences at the Open University; Martin Brasier is Professor of Palaeobiology at the University of Oxford; Rachel Wood is Lecturer in Carbonate Geoscience at the University of Edinburgh.
Views: 394 BBC Podcasts
Ediacara
 
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Breve descripción de la fauna del periodo Ediacarense.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 2517 Karime Nachon
Is Dickinsonia our oldest ancestor?
 
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Scientists from ANU have discovered molecules of fat in an ancient fossil to reveal the earliest confirmed animal in the geological record that lived on Earth 558 million years ago. The strange creature called Dickinsonia, which grew up to 1.4 metres in length and was oval shaped with rib-like segments running along its body, was part of the Ediacara Biota that lived on Earth 20 million years prior to the ‘Cambrian explosion’ of modern animal life.
Views: 155126 ANU TV
Catching the second Ediacara wave - PDU2 Adelaide 2016
 
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Catching the second Ediacara wave: ecology and biology of the Ediacara Biota as recorded in South Australia Prof. Mary L. DROSER University of California, Riverside, USA Monday 11 July, 9:30 am – Inaugural Session – Ediacaran Mary was born in New York but spent summers as a kid playing in tide pools, fascinated by the marine invertebrates. She combined her interest in marine ecology with her love of geology to become a palaeontologist. She attended the University of Rochester, New York, for her undergraduate degree and then the University of Southern California for her PhD. She is currently a professor at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on the advent of animals, and interactions between organisms and their environments through time. She has been working for over 15 years on the Ediacara Biota. Abstract: Patterns of origination and evolution of early complex life are largely interpreted from the fossils of the Ediacara Biota. The iconic record of South Australia is a critical window to Ediacaran organisms after the reign of the rangeomorphs. Study of 30 beds within the Ediacara Member has demonstrated that this younger assemblage, as evidenced by dramatic development of body plans and ecospace utilisation, is a radiation in its own right. Notable aspects include remarkable increases in mobility, the appearance of undisputed bilaterians, the advent of sexual reproduction, the appearance of the first biomineralisers, the advent of active heterotrophy by multicellular organisms and the assembly of complex ecosystems, all attributes of modern animals.
ediacaran biota 05 03
 
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Rough draft of documentary about the Ediacaran Biota Keychain from TaylorCustom. Product Page: http://www.taylorcustom.com/ediacaran-biota-keychain/ Product Documentation: http://www.taylorcustom.com/content/lit/Ediacaran-Biota-fossils.pdf
Views: 32 Taylorcustom
Cambrian fossils and the creation of species
 
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You can also read about the cambrian period: http://www.harunyahia.com/books/darwinism/cambrian/cambrian2.php
Views: 822 ScienceVsEvolution
Emergence of Life [U Illinois] - 3.7 - The Great Experiment of the Ediacaran Fauna
 
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Emergence of Life [U Illinois] PLAYLIST: https://tinyurl.com/EmergenceOfLife Part 3: Fossilization and Precambrian Life-Earth Interaction Lesson 7 - The Great Experiment of the Ediacaran Fauna Notes: https://tinyurl.com/EmergenceOfLifeNotes
Views: 56 Bob Trenwith
The Ediacaran Organisms - Did they Move, What did they Eat?
 
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Learn more about the Ediacaran organisms - is there evidence that they moved? If they were animals, what did they eat and how did they eat it if they didn't have mouths or heads?
Views: 1565 Complex Life
Earliest animal fossils are identified
 
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Scientists have identified the earliest known animal in the geological record.It's a 558-million-year-old oval-shaped creature that may have borne a superficial resemblance to a segmented jellyfish. Researchers found specimens of the creature, known as Dickinsonia, that was so well preserved they still contained molecules of cholesterol. This fat is a hallmark of animal life, the team reports in the journal Science.Dickinsonia belongs to a group of life forms known as the Ediacaran biota. They were the first complex multi-cellular organisms to appear on Earth.But they have been extremely difficult to classify, and their position on the tree of life has been one of the greatest mysteries in palaeontology. Different teams of scientists have variously classified them as lichens, fungi, protozoans, evolutionary dead-ends and even as an intermediate stage between plants and animals. The new analysis of a specimen found in north-west Russia places Dickinsonia firmly within the animal kingdom."The fossil fat molecules that we've found prove that animals were large and abundant 558 million years ago, millions of years earlier than previously thought," said co-author Jochen Brocks, an associate professor at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra. "Scientists have been fighting for more than 75 years over what Dickinsonia and other bizarre fossils of the Ediacaran Biota were," he explained, adding: "The fossil fat now confirms Dickinsonia as the oldest known animal fossil, solving a decades-old mystery that has been the Holy Grail of palaeontology. " The Ediacaran biota appeared around 600 million years ago, and flourished for tens of millions of years before the event called the Cambrian explosion. This massive diversification of life occurred around 541 million years ago; it's when most of the major animal groups appear in the fossil record. The Ediacaran species largely disappear when the Cambrian explosion happens.As such, they straddle an ancient age when the Earth was dominated by bacteria and a later age of dominance by animals. Most multicellular life leaves behind stable molecules called sterane hydrocarbons which can be preserved in sediments for millions of years. The molecular structures and abundances of these compounds can be specific to particular types of organism.Team member Ilya Bobrovskiy, from ANU, extracted and analysed molecules from inside the fossil. He found that Dickinsonia fossils contained very high levels of cholesterol molecules - up to 93% - compared with the surrounding sediment, where levels were roughly 11%. Furthermore, the fossils lacked the types of stable molecules that are sometimes left behind by fungi."The problem that we had to overcome was finding Dickinsonia fossils that retained some organic matter," said Ilya Bobrovskiy. "Most rocks containing these fossils, such as those from the Ediacara Hills in Australia, have endured a lot of heat, a lot of pressure, and then they were weathered after that -
Views: 25 Today News
The Ediacaran Biota and the development of modern marine ecosystems
 
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The Ediacaran Biota and the development of modern marine ecosystems A Marine Life Talk at the National Oceanography Centre by Alex Liu Life in the modern oceans is abundant and diverse, but it hasn't always been that way. For almost three billion years following the initial evolution of life, the only inhabitants of the marine realm were microscopic, and largely microbial. Then, some 580 million years ago, large and complex organisms suddenly appear in the fossil record. Known as the Ediacaran Biota, these enigmatic and unusual life-forms, bearing little resemblance to any organisms seen before or since, seemingly dominated the planet for around 40 million years. This domination ended with the 'Cambrian Explosion' around 540 million years ago, when modern animal groups can first be recognised worldwide, and the Ediacaran organisms disappear from the record. Find out more at http://noc.ac.uk/news/marine-life-talk-%E2%80%93-6-december-2012
Views: 18267 NOC news
Ediacaran Biota - Untitled
 
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The second youtube distributed EB track, first one being "Speedcore of the Opera"
Views: 545 ZBRMusic
lifeforms #0 - Ediacara
 
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Lifeforms #0 - Ediacara - is a working step of a video performance / installation. All the projections are connected to the physical environment and the project was designed to take place in differents indoor architectures, until a possible 360° complete immersion. This step of creation was played during la fete de l'anim' festival, in Lille (L'Hybride), march 2013 Some images and sounds are yet to be created, but it gives an idea... Enjoy. More informations will coming soon... Directed by Ludovic BURCZYKOWSKI, with the help of Simon LEBON (3D, and more) and Marie FROMONT (some "tadpols") total length of this current version was about 25 minutes. 7 beamers, 2 laptops ------ Les formes de vies #0 - Ediacara est une étape de travail d'une performance / installation, jouée lors de la fête de l'anim' de Lille, en Mars 2013 à L'hybride. L'ensemble des vidéo projections est raccordé à l'environnement physique, et le projet global est pensé pour s'intégrer dans différentes architectures intérieures, jusqu'à une possible immersion complète à 360°. Des animations et des passages sonores sont encore à composer, mais ça donne une idée... La durée totale de cette prestation fût d'environ 25 minutes. 7 projecteurs vidéos, 2 laptops. D'autres informations à venir ... Un projet de Ludovic BURCZYKOWSKI, réalisé avec l'aide de Simon Lebon (3D, et plus) et Marie Formont (quelques "têtards") contact : ludo.czy[at]gmail.com
Views: 464 yoplabom
The chronicles of Charnia : morphology and morphogenesis in an iconic Ediacaran taxon
 
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By Recorded at the International Symposium on the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada. With thanks to Memorial University of Newfoundland and The Geological Survey of Newfoundland and Labrador.
Views: 758 Palaeo cast
Ediacaran biota | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ediacaran_biota 00:04:05 1 History 00:07:57 2 Preservation 00:08:06 2.1 Microbial mats 00:09:26 2.2 Fossilization 00:11:06 2.3 Scale of preservation 00:12:13 3 Morphology 00:19:56 4 Classification and interpretation 00:21:07 4.1 Cnidarians 00:22:27 4.2 Protozoans 00:23:14 4.3 New phylum 00:24:16 4.4 Lichen hypothesis 00:25:36 4.5 Other interpretations 00:26:26 5 Origin 00:31:11 5.1 Preservation bias 00:32:04 5.2 Predation and grazing 00:33:20 5.3 Competition 00:33:58 5.4 Change in environmental conditions 00:34:43 6 Assemblages 00:35:18 6.1 Avalon-type assemblage 00:37:24 6.2 Ediacara-type assemblage 00:38:01 6.3 Nama-type assemblage 00:39:05 6.4 Significance of assemblages 00:41:06 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7411410319993871 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Ediacaran (; formerly Vendian) biota consisted of enigmatic tubular and frond-shaped, mostly sessile organisms that lived during the Ediacaran Period (ca. 635–542 Mya). Trace fossils of these organisms have been found worldwide, and represent the earliest known complex multicellular organisms. The Ediacaran biota may have radiated in a proposed event called the Avalon explosion, 575 million years ago, after the Earth had thawed from the Cryogenian period's extensive glaciation. The biota largely disappeared with the rapid increase in biodiversity known as the Cambrian explosion. Most of the currently existing body plans of animals first appeared in the fossil record of the Cambrian rather than the Ediacaran. For macroorganisms, the Cambrian biota appears to have completely replaced the organisms that dominated the Ediacaran fossil record, although relationships are still a matter of debate. The organisms of the Ediacaran Period first appeared around 600 million years ago and flourished until the cusp of the Cambrian 542 million years ago, when the characteristic communities of fossils vanished. A diverse Ediacaran community was discovered in 1995 in Sonora, Mexico, and is approximately 555 million years in age, roughly coeval with Ediacaran fossils of the Ediacara Hills, South Australia and the White Sea, Russia. While rare fossils that may represent survivors have been found as late as the Middle Cambrian (510 to 500 million years ago), the earlier fossil communities disappear from the record at the end of the Ediacaran leaving only curious fragments of once-thriving ecosystems. Multiple hypotheses exist to explain the disappearance of this biota, including preservation bias, a changing environment, the advent of predators and competition from other life-forms. Determining where Ediacaran organisms fit in the tree of life has proven challenging; it is not even established that they were animals, with suggestions that they were lichens (fungus-alga symbionts), algae, protists known as foraminifera, fungi or microbial colonies, or hypothetical intermediates between plants and animals. The morphology and habit of some taxa (e.g. Funisia dorothea) suggest relationships to Porifera or Cnidaria. Kimberella may show a similarity to molluscs, and other organisms have been thought to possess bilateral symmetry, although this is controversial. Most macroscopic fossils are morphologically distinct from later life-forms: they resemble discs, tubes, mud-filled bags or quilted mattresses. Due to the difficulty of deducing evolutionary relationships among these organisms, some palaeontologists have suggested that these represent completely extinct lineages that do not resemble any living organism. One palaeontologist proposed a separate kingdom level category Vendozoa (now renamed Vendobionta) in the Linnaean hierarchy for the Ediacaran biota. If these enigmatic organisms left no descendants, their strange forms might be seen as a "failed experiment" in multicellular life, with later multicellular life ev ...
Views: 28 wikipedia tts
Scientists discover fat dating back 558 millions years from the earliest animal - Daily News
 
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Scientists discover fat dating back 558 millions years from the earliest animal - Daily News #Scientists, #discover, #dating, #back, #558, #millions, #years, #from, #earliest, #animal  Scientists have discovered remnants of fat in an ancient fossil that belongs to the earliest confirmed animal.  The fat, which was discovered by researchers from the Australian National University, dates back 558 million years, and belonged to a strange creature called Dickinsonia.  Dickinsonia grew up to 1.4 metres in length and was oval shaped with rib-like segments running along its body.  Its fossilised remains were discovered in a remote area near the White Sea in Russia.  Dr Jochen Brocks, who led the study, said: “The fossil fat molecules that we've found prove that animals were large and abundant 558 million years ago, millions of years earlier than previously thought.  "Scientists have been fighting for more than 75 years over what Dickinsonia and other bizarre fossils of the Edicaran Biota were: giant single-celled amoeba, lichen, failed experiments of evolution or the earliest animals on Earth.  “The fossil fat now confirms Dickinsonia as the oldest known animal fossil, solving a decades-old mystery that has been the Holy Grail of palaeontology."  Until now, researchers have struggled to find Dickinsonia fossils that retain some organic matter.  Mr Ilya Bobrovskiy, an author of the study, said: “Most rocks containing these fossils such as those from the Ediacara Hills in Australia have endured a lot of heat, a lot of pressure, and then they were weathered after that - these are the rocks that palaeontologists studied for many decades, which explained why they were stuck on the question of Dickinsonia's true identity.”  To understand how old the fossil was, the researchers analysed molecules inside it.  Dr Brocks said: “When Ilya showed me the results, I just couldn't believe it. But I also immediately saw the significance."
Views: 70 Celeb Daily News
Life, biota
 
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A quick visit to Helsinki sea world. Not special place as it was infested with people "surprise" but the creatures were nice....as it is place mostly for children. Oceans are our life support system. I personally think that mankind has gone over that line when there is no return only delaying the end. Soon places like that can be called as "museum". Showing something we once had. www,death-illustrated.net Music by Clint Mansell from the movie Fountain. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0414993/
Views: 66 death-illustrated
Ediacaran fossil site - Nilpena Station, South Australia
 
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Nilpena Station, south of Leigh Creek in South Australia, is host to one of the most important ediacaran fossil sites internationally. These fossil fields represent the earliest evidence of complex life on earth, providing an understanding of the early evolution of life. The fossil fields at Nilpena are an asset of universal value and that’s why the South Australia Government plans to create a new national park to protect and preserve the fossils on Nilpena Station. in the Flinders Ranges Ensuring the secrets of the ancient seafloor continue to be explored and improve our understanding of life on Earth.
EDIACARAN COELOMATES
 
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Views: 250 Walter Jahn
Garden of Ediacara- Arms Race of Animals 2013
 
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Vendian biota are some of the first large macro-fossils of possible organisms. They are found on all the most ancient continents - for example: North America, South Africa, Australia, Europe, Siberia. It's known as the time period before "the arms race of animals", before active predation and armament existed. Was it a peaceful garden of Eden in the ocean?
Views: 1720 Ron Schmidtling
Stinchcomb-Ediacaran fossils
 
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Puzzling soft bodied fossils known as both ediacaran fossils and also as vendozoans are found in rocks of late Proterozoic age ( approx. 600 million years). Originally thought to be soft bodied representatives of living phyla, they are now thought by many paleontologists to have been some sort of evolutionary "experiment", possibly representative of some form of symbiosis between cyanobacteria and a eukaryotic life form. Some have suggested marine lichens as a model with modern lichens being a reminant of what was once a major ecosystem of the Precambrian earth.
Views: 382 Bruce Stinchcomb
Dickinsonia fossils , Analysis of organic matter preserved, Russia, White Sea
 
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Dickinsonia fossils , Analysis of organic matter preserved, Russia, White Sea Analysis of organic matter preserved in the Dickinsonia fossils placed the creature firmly within the animal kingdom Most multicellular life leaves behind stable molecules called sterane hydrocarbons which can be preserved in sediments for millions of years. The molecular structures and abundances of these compounds can be specific to particular types of organism. Team member Ilya Bobrovskiy, from ANU, extracted and analysed molecules from inside the fossil. He found that Dickinsonia fossils contained very high levels of cholesterol molecules - up to 93% - compared with the surrounding sediment, where levels were roughly 11%. Furthermore, the fossils lacked the types of stable molecules that are sometimes left behind by fungi. "The problem that we had to overcome was finding Dickinsonia fossils that retained some organic matter," said Ilya Bobrovskiy. "Most rocks containing these fossils, such as those from the Ediacara Hills in Australia, have endured a lot of heat, a lot of pressure, and then they were weathered after that - these are the rocks that palaeontologists studied for many decades, which explained why they were stuck on the question of Dickinsonia's true identity."Arabic: تم العثور على أقدم أحافير الحيوانات ، وجدت في البحر الأبيض في روسيا Bosnian: Najstariji fosili životinja su identifikovani, pronađeni u Belom moru u Rusiji Danish: Tidligere dyrefossiler identificeres, der findes i Det Hvide Hav i Rusland German: Früheste Tierfossilien werden identifiziert, im Weißen Meer in Russland gefunden Greek: Τα πρώιμα απολιθώματα ζώων εντοπίζονται στη Λευκή Θάλασσα στη Ρωσία Spanish: Se identifican los primeros fósiles de animales encontrados en el Mar Blanco en Rusia Persian: فسیل های اولیه حیوانات شناسایی شده اند، در دریای سفید در روسیه یافت می شوند Finnish: Identifioidaan vanhimmat eläinfossilit, jotka löytyvät Valkoisesta merestä Venäjällä French: Premiers fossiles d'animaux sont identifiés, trouvés dans la mer Blanche en Russie Hindi: रूस में व्हाइट सागर में पाए जाने वाले सबसे पुराने पशु जीवाश्मों की पहचान की जाती है Hungarian: Az oroszországi Fehér-tengerben megtalálható legkorábbi állatfosszíliák Indonesian: Fosil hewan paling awal diidentifikasi, ditemukan di Laut Putih di Rusia Italian: I primi fossili animali sono stati identificati, rinvenuti nel Mar Bianco in Russia Hebrew: מאובנים בעלי חיים המוקדמים מזוהים, שנמצאו בים הלבן ברוסיה Japanese: 最も早い動物の化石が同定され、ロシアの白海で発見された Korean: 러시아에서 백해에서 발견 된 가장 빠른 동물 화석 Nepali: सबैभन्दा पहिला पशु जीवाश्म पहिचान गरिएको छ, रूसमा व्हाइट सागरमा पाइन्छ Dutch: Vroegste dierlijke fossielen worden geïdentificeerd, gevonden in de Witte Zee in Rusland Norwegian: Tidligste fossiler er identifisert, funnet i Hviterhavet i Russland Chichewa: Zakale kwambiri zakuthambo zimapezeka, zomwe zimapezeka ku White Sea ku Russia Punjabi: ਸਭ ਤੋਂ ਪੁਰਾਣੀ ਜਾਨਵਰ ਦੀਆਂ ਫਾਸਿਲਾਂ ਦੀ ਸ਼ਨਾਖਤ ਕੀਤੀ ਗਈ ਹੈ, ਰੂਸ ਵਿੱਚ ਵ੍ਹਾਈਟ ਸਾਈਨ ਵਿੱਚ ਮਿਲੀਆਂ ਹਨ Polish: Zidentyfikowano najwcześniejsze skamieniałości zwierząt, znalezione na Morzu Białym w Rosji Portuguese: Primeiros fósseis de animais são identificados, encontrados no Mar Branco na Rússia Russian: Самые ранние животные окаменелости идентифицированы, найденные в Белом море в России Sinhala: රුසියාවේ සුදු මුහුදේ සොයාගෙන ඇති මුල්ම සත්ත්ව ෆොසිල් හඳුනා ගැනේ Swedish: Tidigaste djurfossiler identifieras, som finns i Vita havet i Ryssland Swahili: Vitu vya kale vya mifugo vya kale vinatambuliwa, vinavyopatikana katika Bahari Nyeupe nchini Urusi Filipino: Ang pinakamaagang fossils ng hayop ay nakilala, na matatagpuan sa White Sea sa Russia Vietnamese: Hóa thạch động vật đầu tiên được xác định, được tìm thấy ở Biển Trắng ở Nga Chinese: 确定最早的动物化石,发现于俄罗斯的白海 Chinese (Simplified): 确定最早的动物化石,发现于俄罗斯的白海 Chinese (Traditional): 確定最早的動物化石,發現於俄羅斯的白海
Views: 109 Gaia Deliciosas
'The Ediacaran Man' Documentary - Trailer
 
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'The Ediacaran Man' is the story of one of Australia's unsung scientific heroes. Geologist Reg Sprigg discovered that period in time about 500 million years ago when single cell life went multi-cellular, and he did it in a remote and arid region of South Australia. For years he fought against great odds to prove his work to be correct. This documentary is the story of Sprigg's life and his amazing discoveries. It is based on the book 'Rock Star: The story of Reg Sprigg - an outback legend' by Kristin Weidenbach.
Views: 3125 EdiacaranProductions
New windows into the ecology and taphonomy of Ediacaran acanthomorphs
 
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By Peter W. Adamson and Nicholas J. Butterfield Recorded at the 59th Annual Meeting of the Palaeontological Association, Cardiff.
Views: 309 Palaeo cast
Ediacara : First show ! (second song)
 
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Hey !! This is the band which I'm drumming for !! We call it "exeprimental metal", and this is our first live show, it was a lot of fun despite the mistakes ^^ Sorry for the quality, and I hope you'll enjoy it ! Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ediacara/153468331484516?fref=ts
Views: 424 Matthis Lemonnier
Stinchcomb-Mr. Darwin and the Eozoon, a geologic exerpt from Darwin's Origin
 
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A geologic exerpt from Charles Darwin's "Origin of Species" eozoon was a pseudofossil discovered in very ancient rocks (Precambrian of Quebec) in the mid 19th century and considered at the time to be evidence for the earths earliest life. Eozoon by the beginning of the 20th century was recognized to be a pseudofossil and hence was non-biogenic in its origin. Eozoon did however, foretell the controversy regarding stromatolites. Stromatolites, formed from the physiological activity of monerans, were found to occur in some of the earths oldest rocks and showed that life indeed was a very ancient phenomena on the Earth. (Note- when Darwin "says", "and during those vast periods the world swarmed with living creatures"--a Precambrian stromatolite appears on the screen. Darwin and other natural historians of the time did not know about stromatolites and their significance in the early (Precambrian) history of the globe---that would come in the 20th century! The sudden appearence of fossils in the geologic record which Darwin talks about is now known as the Cambrian Radiation Event.
Views: 295 Bruce Stinchcomb
'Tracking Neanderthals' - 11/28/2007
 
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Where Neanderthals once lived and how they interacted with one another and the world around them is the subject of Western Washington University associate professor Todd Koetje's presentation at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28, at Bellingham City Council chambers. In 1995, Koetje joined a team extracting artifacts from Weasel Cave in the Caucasus Mountains of North Ossetia-Alania in Southern Russia to piece together what is left from the Neanderthals who lived between 250,000 and 300,000 years ago. Koetje will present and discuss his research findings from 11 trips to the caves. Over the past three decades, Weasel Cave has given researchers a bounty of information about Neanderthal life; it is estimated that only about 10 percent of the cave has been excavated. The lecture is part of the Dean's Community Lecture Series presented by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. For more information, contact Todd Koetje, associate professor of Anthropology, at (360) 650-4791 or [email protected]
Ediacara Live! (continuazione) @ Paprika Jazz Club, Mariano - Dalmine (BG), 03/03/2011
 
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Ed ora la del concerto degli Ediacara, gruppo Progressive Rock di Bergamo, che si è esibito il 03 Marzo 2011 al Paprika Jazz Club! Buon divertimento! :)
First Life with David Attenborough- Footprints
 
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For more, visit http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/first-life-footprints.html/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | A team of paleontologists uncover the earliest moving animals in the fossilized remains of an ancient sea in Australia.
Views: 14150 Discovery
The Emergence of Life: On Earth (Session 1)
 
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Opening remarks and presentations on the emergence of life on Earth, including "Gleaning Clues to Earth's Earliest Life from Modern Geothermal Systems," "The Origin of Life: What Do We Know?" and "RNA Worlds." Part of a day-long symposium on the origins of life, how we came to know it, and what it means. Speaker Biography: Mary Voytek is senior scientist for astrobiology at NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Speaker Biography: A well-known historian of recent science (science of the recent past), biology and biomedicine, Nathaniel Comfort is currently a professor at the Institute of the History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University. His books include "The Science of Human Perfection: How Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine" and "The Tangled Field: Barbara McClintock's Search for the Patterns of Genetic Control." He served as the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology. Speaker Biography: Nsikan Akpan is science reporter and producer for the PBS NewsHour. Speaker Biography: Matt Schrenk is an assistant professor of geomicrobiology at Michigan State University. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7725
Views: 4831 LibraryOfCongress
Charnia | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Charnia Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Charnia is a genus of frond-like Ediacaran lifeforms with segmented, leaf-like ridges branching alternately to the right and left from a zig-zag medial suture (thus exhibiting glide reflection, or opposite isometry). The genus Charnia was named after Charnwood Forest in Leicestershire, England, where the first fossilised specimen was found. Charnia is significant because it was the first Precambrian fossil to be recognized as such. The living organism was a type of life form that grew on the sea floor and is believed to have fed on nutrients in the water. Despite Charnia's fern-like appearance, it is not a photosynthetic plant or alga because the nature of the fossilbeds where specimens have been found implies that it originally lived in deep water, well below the photic zone where photosynthesis can occur.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Death Valley National Park | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Death Valley National Park 00:02:53 1 Geographic setting 00:05:22 2 Climate 00:10:04 3 Human history 00:10:14 3.1 Early inhabitants and transient populations 00:12:58 3.2 Boom and bust 00:15:54 3.3 Early tourism 00:17:21 3.4 Protection and later history 00:21:08 4 Geologic history 00:21:45 4.1 Basement and Pahrump Group 00:22:58 4.2 Rifting and deposition 00:24:59 4.3 Compression and uplift 00:26:18 4.4 Stretching and lakes 00:28:14 5 Biology 00:31:34 6 Activities 00:35:10 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Death Valley National Park is an American national park that straddles the California—Nevada border, east of the Sierra Nevada. The park occupies an interface zone between the arid Great Basin and Mojave deserts, protecting the northwest corner of the Mojave Desert and its diverse environment of salt-flats, sand dunes, badlands, valleys, canyons, and mountains. Death Valley is the largest national park in the lower 48 states, and the hottest, driest and lowest of all the national parks in the United States. The second-lowest point in the Western Hemisphere is in Badwater Basin, which is 282 feet (86 m) below sea level. Approximately 91% of the park is a designated wilderness area. The park is home to many species of plants and animals that have adapted to this harsh desert environment. Some examples include creosote bush, bighorn sheep, coyote, and the Death Valley pupfish, a survivor from much wetter times. UNESCO included Death Valley as the principal feature of its Mojave and Colorado Deserts Biosphere Reserve in 1984.A series of Native American groups inhabited the area from as early as 7000 BC, most recently the Timbisha around 1000 AD who migrated between winter camps in the valleys and summer grounds in the mountains. A group of European-Americans, trapped in the valley in 1849 while looking for a shortcut to the gold fields of California, gave the valley its name, even though only one of their group died there. Several short-lived boom towns sprang up during the late 19th and early 20th centuries to mine gold and silver. The only long-term profitable ore to be mined was borax, which was transported out of the valley with twenty-mule teams. The valley later became the subject of books, radio programs, television series, and movies. Tourism expanded in the 1920s when resorts were built around Stovepipe Wells and Furnace Creek. Death Valley National Monument was declared in 1933 and the park was substantially expanded and became a national park in 1994.The natural environment of the area has been shaped largely by its geology. The valley is actually a graben with the oldest rocks being extensively metamorphosed and at least 1.7 billion years old. Ancient, warm, shallow seas deposited marine sediments until rifting opened the Pacific Ocean. Additional sedimentation occurred until a subduction zone formed off the coast. The subduction uplifted the region out of the sea and created a line of volcanoes. Later the crust started to pull apart, creating the current Basin and Range landform. Valleys filled with sediment and, during the wet times of glacial periods, with lakes, such as Lake Manly. In 2013, Death Valley National Park was designated as a dark sky park by the International Dark-Sky Association.
Views: 18 wikipedia tts
PBS NOVA - Os primeiros 4 Bilhões de Anos da Austrália Ep.1 de 4 - Despertar (Legendado PT BR)
 
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De todos os continentes na Terra, nenhum preserva uma história tão espetacular das origens do nosso planeta do que a Austrália. "Os primeiros 4 bilhões de anos da Austrália" leva os telespectadores a uma aventura rodante desde o nascimento da Terra até o surgimento do mundo que conhecemos hoje. Com a ajuda do anfitrião e do cientista Richard Smith, conhecemos dinossauros titânicos e cangurus gigantes, monstros marinhos e crustáceos pré-históricos, montanhas desaparecidas e asteroides mortais. Alcance épico, de natureza íntima, esta é a história incalculável da terra "abaixo", o continente de uma ilha que conseguiu tudo.
Views: 123 Marcelo Magalhães
Fossil | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Fossil 00:02:00 1 Fossilization processes 00:02:17 1.1 Permineralization 00:03:17 1.2 Casts and molds 00:03:51 1.3 Authigenic mineralization 00:04:31 1.4 Replacement and recrystallization 00:05:07 1.5 Adpression (compression-impression) 00:06:07 1.5.1 Soft tissue, cell and molecular preservation 00:07:30 1.6 Carbonization 00:07:57 1.7 Bioimmuration 00:08:45 2 Dating 00:08:54 2.1 Estimating dates 00:09:56 2.1.1 Stratigraphy 00:12:13 2.2 Limitations 00:13:22 3 Sites 00:13:30 3.1 Lagerstätten 00:14:16 3.2 Stromatolites 00:17:51 4 Types 00:18:00 4.1 Index 00:18:49 4.2 Trace 00:20:06 4.3 Transitional 00:20:49 4.4 Microfossils 00:21:38 4.5 Resin 00:22:32 4.6 Derived 00:23:01 4.7 Wood 00:23:43 4.8 Subfossil 00:24:58 4.9 Chemical fossils 00:25:34 5 Astrobiology 00:26:36 6 Pseudofossils 00:27:21 7 History of the study of fossils 00:27:55 7.1 Before Darwin 00:32:11 7.2 Linnaeus and Darwin 00:33:22 7.3 After Darwin 00:34:50 7.4 Modern era 00:37:28 8 Trading and collecting 00:38:17 9 Gallery Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A fossil (from Classical Latin fossilis; literally, "obtained by digging") is any preserved remains, impression, or trace of any once-living thing from a past geological age. Examples include bones, shells, exoskeletons, stone imprints of animals or microbes, objects preserved in amber, hair, petrified wood, oil, coal, and DNA remnants. The totality of fossils is known as the fossil record. Paleontology is the study of fossils: their age, method of formation, and evolutionary significance. Specimens are usually considered to be fossils if they are over 10,000 years old. The oldest fossils are from around 3.48 billion years old to 4.1 billion years old. The observation in the 19th century that certain fossils were associated with certain rock strata led to the recognition of a geological timescale and the relative ages of different fossils. The development of radiometric dating techniques in the early 20th century allowed scientists to quantitatively measure the absolute ages of rocks and the fossils they host. There are many processes that lead to fossilization, including permineralization, casts and molds, authigenic mineralization, replacement and recrystallization, adpression, carbonization, and bioimmuration. Fossils vary in size from one-micrometre (1 µm) bacteria to dinosaurs and trees, many meters long and weighing many tons. A fossil normally preserves only a portion of the deceased organism, usually that portion that was partially mineralized during life, such as the bones and teeth of vertebrates, or the chitinous or calcareous exoskeletons of invertebrates. Fossils may also consist of the marks left behind by the organism while it was alive, such as animal tracks or feces (coprolites). These types of fossil are called trace fossils or ichnofossils, as opposed to body fossils. Some fossils are biochemical and are called chemofossils or biosignatures.
Views: 18 wikipedia tts