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How to Memorize Organic Chemistry Reactions and Reagents [Workshop Recording]
 
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http://Leah4sci.com/guide presents: How To 'Memorize' Organic Chemistry Reactions and Reagents! Video recording of Leah4sci live workshop. Purchase the Organic Chemistry Reagent guide through http://leah4sci.com/guide using discount code LEAH4SCI for 15% off. While understanding rather than memorization is KEY to orgo success, with so many reactions and reagents to learn you can't help but memorize. And while there's no 'right' or 'wrong' way to go about it, there are tips and tricks you can use to be more efficient in your approach and long term retention. Most of the Leah4sci workshops are only available in the Organic Chemistry Study Hall http://leah4sci.com/join I felt this one was so important I'm making it available to everyone. This is a Replay of a LIVE Workshop! You'll see how to maximize your study efforts and retention, memorization tricks beyond the next quiz/exam, and how to find reagent structure/details quickly and efficiently! I get a small commission when you purchase the reagent guide using coupon code LEAH4SCI for 15% off. Details here: http://leah4sci.com/guide For more in-depth review on Organic Chemistry Reagents including practice problems and explanations, come join my online membership site the organic chemistry study hall: http://leah4sci.com/join For private online tutoring visit my website: http://leah4sci.com/organic-chemistry Finally, for questions and comments, find me on social media here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Leah4Sci
Views: 109680 Leah4sci
Keto Enol Tautomerism Acid and Base Reaction and Mechanism
 
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Keto Enol Tautomerism - KET reaction and mechanism in acidic and basic conditions by http://leah4sci.com Struggling with Organic chemistry? Grab my free ebook '10 Secrets To Acing Organic Chemistry' http://leah4sci.com/orgo-ebook/ This video walks you through the concept of Keto-Enol Tautomers showing you how to convert from keto to enol and back in both acidic and basic conditions. This is an important concept to understand when studying alkyne hydration reactions as well as the more advanced organic chemistry reactions. I offer private online tutoring for organic chemistry and MCAT prep. Details on my website: http://leah4sci.com/organic-chemistry-tutor/ for questions and comments, find me on social media here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Leah4sci Twitter: https://twitter.com/Leah4Sci Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+LeahFisch Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/leah4sci/
Views: 56230 Leah4sci
Organic Chemistry 51C. Lecture 06. Formation of Imines & Enamines from Aldehydes & Ketones.
 
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UCI Chem 51C Organic Chemistry (Spring 2012) Lec 06. Organic Chemistry -- Formation of Imines & Enamines -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51c_organic_chemistry.html Instructor: James S. Nowick, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: This is the third quarter course in the organic chemistry series. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds. Organic Chemistry 51C is part of OpenChem. http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html Recorded on April 19, 2012 Index of Topics: 4:10-HCN Addition and Wittig Reaction 7:13-Ketones or Aldehydes and Amines 10:32-Aldimine Formation Example 15:23-Ketimine Formation Example 19:55-Mechanism of Acid-Catalyzed Imine Formation 33:28-Acid-Catalyzed Breakdown of the Hemiaminal 44:33-Answer to Student Question 47:50-Imine Formation 49:49-Reversibility 53:15-Example of Reversibility 55:50-Enanamines 59:04-Nucleophilicity of Amine 1:01:50-Imine Reaction with Base Required attribution: Nowick, James S. Organic Chemistry 51C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51c_organic_chemistry.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 9993 UCI Open
13. Addition to Form Three-Membered Rings: Carbenoids and Epoxidation
 
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Freshman Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 125B) After drill on the mechanism of the pinacol rearrangement, this lecture applies molecular-orbital analysis to simultaneous electrophilic/nucleophilic attack by a single atom to form a three-membered ring from an alkene. These reactions provide drill in consistent use of the curved-arrow formalism for describing electron-pair shifts. Two alternative mechanisms for formation of cyclopropanes by the alkylzinc Simmons-Smith "carbenoid" reagent are proposed, and the one-step mechanism is supported by theory. Epoxidation of alkenes by peroxycarboxylic acids also seems to go by way of a concerted electrophilic/nucleophilic process involving a single transition state. The stereochemistry and scale of various paths to epoxides is discussed in the context of their commercial utility. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Pinacol Rearrangement Mechanism 04:36 - Chapter 2. Carbenoids and Simmons-Smith Cyclopropanation 17:56 - Chapter 3. Epoxidation by Peroxycarboxylic Acids 38:40 - Chapter 4. Other Routes to Epoxides 46:44 - Chapter 5. Practical Utility of Epoxides Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 3351 YaleCourses
Introduction to rates of reaction
 
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An A2 Chemistry video introducing rates of reaction, how rate is measured and how to calculate the rate constant from initial rate data. More information at www.boomerchemistry.com
Views: 625 Boomerchemistry
Rate Constant for a Reversible Reaction (Example)
 
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Determines the reverse rate constant given the equilibrium constant and the forward rate constant for an elementary reaction. Made by faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering. Check out our Chemistry playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4xAk5aclnUi1CEFNwjcheMgyWe8BwuLS Check out our website for screencasts organized by popular textbooks: http://www.learncheme.com/screencasts/chemistry
Views: 9751 LearnChemE
Measurement of rate of reaction
 
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Class 12th chemistry, Unit 4
Views: 1283 MHS Gurukul
Organic Chemistry 51C. Lecture 02. Reactivity of Carbonyl Compounds.
 
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UCI Chem 51C Organic Chemistry (Spring 2012) Lec 02. Organic Chemistry -- Reactivity of Carbonyl Compounds -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51c_organic_chemistry.html Instructor: James S. Nowick, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: This is the third quarter course in the organic chemistry series. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds. Organic Chemistry 51C is part of OpenChem. http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html Recorded on April 5, 2012 Index of Topics: -1:00 Reactivity with Nucleophilic -4:08 Resonance in a Carbonyl group -8:41 Nucleophiles and Carbonyls -18:09 LiAlH4 and NaBH4 -26:29 Example Reaction -32:38 Reduction -44:10 Hydride Reducing Agents -48:57 Sodium Hydride -54:02 Oxidation State -1:00:14 Reactivity Toward Nucleophiles -1:08:44 Making Racemic Mixtures -1:12:38 Chiral Hydride Reagent -1:16:05 Tert-Butyl Cyclohexanone Example Required attribution: Nowick, James S. Organic Chemistry 51C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51c_organic_chemistry.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 21052 UCI Open
Chem 201. Organic Reaction Mechanisms I. Lecture 04. Selectivity.
 
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UCI Chem 201 Organic Reaction Mechanisms I (Fall 2012) Lec 04. Organic Reaction Mechanism -- Selectivity View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_201_organic_reactions_mechanisms_i.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Advanced treatment of basic mechanistic principles of modern organic chemistry. Topics include molecular orbital theory, orbital symmetry control of organic reactions, aromaticity, carbonium ion chemistry, free radical chemistry, the chemistry of carbenes and carbanions, photochemistry, electrophilic substitutions, aromatic chemistry. Organic Reaction Mechanisms I (Chem 201) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 20-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms I" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Recorded October 10, 2012. Required attribution: Van Vranken, David Organic Reaction Mechanisms 201 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_201_organic_reactions_mechanisms_i.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 13211 UCI Open
Organic Chemistry 51C. Lecture 11. More Reactions of Enols and Enolates.
 
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UCI Chem 51C Organic Chemistry (Spring 2012) Lec 11. Organic Chemistry -- More Reactions of Enols and Enolates -- View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51c_organic_chemistry.html Instructor: James S. Nowick, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: This is the third quarter course in the organic chemistry series. Topics covered include: Fundamental concepts relating to carbon compounds with emphasis on structural theory and the nature of chemical bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and spectroscopic, physical, and chemical properties of the principal classes of carbon compounds. Organic Chemistry 51C is part of OpenChem. http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html Recorded on May 10, 2012 Index of Topics: 1:05-Enolates 3:57-Enolates and Electrophiles 9:11-Alpha-Halogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes 13:58-Halogenation Mechanism 21:58-Halogenation Example 25:10-Alpha-Halogenation Promoted by Base 35:29-Haloform Reaction 39:02-Haloform Reaction Mechanism 43:37-pKa Values 53:20-Reason for Acidity 1:00:35-AcetoAcetic Ester Synthesis 1:10:36-Malonic Ester Synthesis 1:14:44-Example Problem Required attribution: Nowick, James S. Organic Chemistry 51C (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_51c_organic_chemistry.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 7891 UCI Open
Metal ions in aqueous solution
 
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A metal ion in aqueous solution is a cation, dissolved in water, of chemical formula [M(H2O)n]z+. The solvation number, n, determined by a variety of experimental methods is 4 for Li+ and Be2+ and 6 for elements in periods 3 and 4 of the periodic table. Lanthanide and actinide aqua ions have solvation number of 8 and 9. The strength of the bonds between the metal ion and water molecules in the primary solvation shell increases with the electrical charge, z, on the metal ion and decreases as its radius, r, increases. Aqua ions are subject to hydrolysis. The logarithm of the first hydrolysis constant is proportional to z2/r for most aqua ions. The aqua ion is associated, through hydrogen bonding with other water molecules in a secondary solvation shell. Water molecules in the first hydration shell exchange with molecules in the second solvation shell and molecules in the bulk liquid. The residence time of a molecule in the first shell varies among the chemical elements from about 100 picoseconds to more than 200 years. Aqua ions are prominent in electrochemistry. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 732 Audiopedia
Coupling Reaction-BOC Sciences
 
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A coupling reaction in organic chemistry is a general term for a variety of reactions where two hydrocarbon fragments are coupled with the aid of a metal catalyst. Now, we talk about several coupling reactions include (not exhaustive): Wurtz reaction, Glaser coupling, Ullmann reaction, Grignard reaction, Heck reaction, Sonogashira coupling, Stille reaction and Suzuki reaction.
Views: 182 BOC Sciences
27. Triphenylmethyl and an Introduction to Carbonyl Chemistry
 
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Freshman Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 125B) Painstaking studies of his "hexaphenylethane" and its reactivity convinced Gomberg that he had prepared the first trivalent carbon compound, triphenylmethyl radical, the discovery of which marked the emergence of fundamental organic chemistry in America. Isotopic labeling could decide whether protonated cyclopropane plays a role in Friedel-Crafts alkylation. C-13 NMR spectra of aldehydes and ketones show how characteristic chemical shifts are established empirically. The carbonyl group is thermodynamically stable but kinetically reactive. Its acid- and base-catalyzed reactions often involve loss of an [gr]α-proton to form an enol or enolate intermediate. Carboxylic acids display four fundamentally different reaction patterns. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of acetals illustrates a multistep reaction mechanism involving the carbonyl group. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Triphenylmethyl: Chemistry Comes to America 15:39 - Chapter 2. Protonated Cyclopropane in Friedel-Crafts Alkylation? 22:05 - Chapter 3. Carbonyl Compounds: Energy and Spectroscopy 26:06 - Chapter 4. Carbonyl Compounds: Reactivity Patterns Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 3316 YaleCourses
Curtin–Hammett principle | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtin%E2%80%93Hammett_principle 00:01:03 1 Definition 00:04:25 2 Derivation 00:04:41 3 Classes of reactions under Curtin–Hammett control 00:11:59 3.1 Case I: More stable conformer reacts more quickly 00:12:23 3.1.1 Example: piperidine oxidation 00:13:04 3.2 Case II: Less stable conformer reacts more quickly 00:13:50 3.2.1 Example: tropane alkylation 00:14:30 3.3 Case III: both conformers react at the same rate 00:15:03 3.3.1 Example: SsubN/sub2 reaction of cyclohexyl iodide 00:15:34 3.3.2 Example: radical methylation 00:16:20 4 Application to stereoselective and regioselective reactions 00:17:23 4.1 Application to dynamic kinetic resolution 00:17:43 4.1.1 Noyori asymmetric hydrogenation 00:18:08 4.1.2 Enantioselective lithiation 00:19:01 4.2 Application to regioselective acylation 00:19:55 4.3 Application to asymmetric epoxidation 00:21:37 5 Synthetic applications 00:22:38 5.1 Synthesis of AT2433-A1 00:22:48 5.2 Synthesis of kapakahines B and F 00:23:29 5.3 Synthesis of (+)-griseofulvin 00:25:08 5.4 Synthesis of (+)-allocyathin Bsub2/sub 00:26:46 6 See also 00:28:09 7 References Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9710879647581139 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Curtin–Hammett principle is a principle in chemical kinetics proposed by David Yarrow Curtin and Louis Plack Hammett. It states that, for a reaction that has a pair of reactive intermediates or reactants that interconvert rapidly (as is usually the case for conformational isomers), each going irreversibly to a different product, the product ratio will depend both on the difference in energy between the two conformers and the energy barriers from each of the rapidly equilibrating isomers to their respective products. Stated another way, the product distribution reflects the difference in energy between the two rate-limiting transition states. As a result, the product distribution will not necessarily reflect the equilibrium distribution of the two intermediates. The Curtin–Hammett principle has been invoked to explain selectivity in a variety of stereo- and regioselective reactions. The relationship between the (apparent) rate constants and equilibrium constant is known as the Winstein-Holness equation.
Views: 81 wikipedia tts
Chem 201. Organic Reaction Mechanisms I. Lecture 05. Carbocations
 
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UCI Chem 201 Organic Reaction Mechanisms I (Fall 2012) Lec 05. Organic Reaction Mechanism -- Carbocations View the complete course: http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_201_organic_reactions_mechanisms_i.html Instructor: David Van Vranken, Ph.D. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA Terms of Use: http://ocw.uci.edu/info. More courses at http://ocw.uci.edu Description: Advanced treatment of basic mechanistic principles of modern organic chemistry. Topics include molecular orbital theory, orbital symmetry control of organic reactions, aromaticity, carbonium ion chemistry, free radical chemistry, the chemistry of carbenes and carbanions, photochemistry, electrophilic substitutions, aromatic chemistry. Organic Reaction Mechanisms I (Chem 201) is part of OpenChem: http://ocw.uci.edu/collections/open_chemistry.html This video is part of a 20-lecture graduate-level course titled "Organic Reaction Mechanisms I" taught at UC Irvine by Professor David Van Vranken. Recorded October 12, 2012. Required attribution: Van Vranken, David Organic Reaction Mechanisms 201 (UCI OpenCourseWare: University of California, Irvine), http://ocw.uci.edu/courses/chem_201_organic_reactions_mechanisms_i.html [Access date]. License: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/deed.en_US).
Views: 11889 UCI Open
Iodine and Starch Experiment | Iodine Experiment | Starch Experiment | Science experiments for kids
 
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Iodine and Starch Experiment | Iodine Experiment | Starch Experiment | Science experiments for kids Simple and easy experiment to demonstrate the iodine with starch reaction! For this test you will need: • Two test tubes • Soluble starch powder • Iodine solution • Water • Dropper Procedure: • Put some starch powder into a test tube and fill the test tube with water. • Mix the starch in the test tube well until the starch dissolves in the water. • Fill the other test tube with normal water. • Place both the test tubes in a test tube stand. • Using a dropper take iodine solution. • Put some drops in each test tube. • Observe that the test tube with starch solution turns to purple black color. • The other test tube with normal water retains the color of iodine i.e orange or yellow. Explanation: Starch is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin, which are different forms of glucose/starch. Amylose in starch is responsible for the formation of a deep blue black color. Amylase is long polymer chains of glucose units connected by an alpha acetal linkage and looks much like a coiled spring. However iodine is a potassium iodide reagent and it is not very soluble in water. So, iodine is prepared by dissolving it in water in an aqueous solution of potassium iodide. This results in a linear tri-iodide ion (I3−) complex in iodine which is soluble. This tri-iodide ion (I3−) slips into the coil of the starch causing an intense or deep blue-black color.
Views: 196294 Elearnin
12. Nucleophilic Participation During Electrophilic Addition to Alkenes
 
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Freshman Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 125B) When electrophilic addition involves a localized carbocation intermediate, skeletal rearrangement sometimes occurs, but it can be avoided when both alkene carbons are involved in an unsymmetrical 3-center-2-electron bond, as in Markovnikov hydration via alkoxymercuration followed by reduction. Similarly a reagent that attacks both alkene carbons simultaneously by providing a nucleophilic component during electrophilic attack can avoid rearrangement, as in reactions that proceed via three-membered-ring halonium intermediates. Simultaneity in making two bonds during formation of cyclopropanes from carbenes can be demonstrated using stereochemistry. Anti-Markovnikov hydration can be achieved via hydroboration followed by oxidation with hydroperoxide. Rearrangement of the borane hydroperoxide intermediate with frontside C-O bond formation shows close orbital analogy to backside attack during SN2 substitution. Again syn-addition shows that nucleophilic attack occurs simultaneously with electrophilic attack on the alkene. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Forming Unrearranged Alcohols via Hydroxymercuration 07:36 - Chapter 2. Electrophilic Addition to Alkenes with Nucleophilic Participation: Halonium Ions 24:56 - Chapter 3. Electrophilic Addition to Alkenes with Nucleophilic Participation: Carbenes 36:55 - Chapter 4. Anti-Markovnikov Hydration via Hydroboration and Oxidation Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 4013 YaleCourses
15. Metals and Catalysis in Alkene Oxidation, Hydrogenation, Metathesis, and Polymerization
 
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Freshman Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 125B) Alkenes may be oxidized to diols by permanganate or by OsO4 catalysis. Metal catalysts provide orbitals that allow simultaneous formation of two bonds from metal to alkene or H2. Coupling such oxidative additions to reductive eliminations, provides a low-energy catalytic path for addition of H2 to an alkene. Such catalytic hydrogenation is often said to involve syn stereochemistry, but the primary literature shows that addition can be anti when allylic rearrangement occurs on the catalyst. Similar oxidative/reductive cycles operate in olefin metathesis and metal-catalyzed polymerization. Careful catalyst design allows control over polymer stereochemistry (tacticity). Polymerizations catalyzed by free-radicals or acids typically lack stereochemical control, but there are ways to control regiochemistry and chain length. Latex, a natural polymer, coagulates to form a rubber ball. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Alkene Dihydroxylation 04:28 - Chapter 2. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Alkenes: Oxidative Addition, Reductive Elimination 15:08 - Chapter 3. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Alkenes: Stereochemistry 25:50 - Chapter 4. Olefin Metathesis, Polymerization, and Tacticity 39:00 - Chapter 5. Radical Polymerization 43:16 - Chapter 6. Electrophilic Oligomerization and Polymerization and Rubber Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://oyc.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 7447 YaleCourses
Mod-01 Lec-18 Acid Base Catalysis
 
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Rate processes by Dr. M. Halder, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 4994 nptelhrd
Mod-01 Lec-14 Advance Analytical Course
 
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Advance Analytical Course by Prof. Padma Vankar, Department of Chemistry, IIT Kanpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 435 nptelhrd
Biochemistry
 
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Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. By controlling information flow through biochemical signaling and the flow of chemical energy through metabolism, biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. Over the last 40 years, biochemistry has become so successful at explaining living processes that now almost all areas of the life sciences from botany to medicine are engaged in biochemical research. Today, the main focus of pure biochemistry is in understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of whole organisms. Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life. Depending on the exact definition of the terms used, molecular biology can be thought of as a branch of biochemistry, or biochemistry as a tool with which to investigate and study molecular biology. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 151 Audiopedia
For 2A + B → C, C is formed at the rate of 1 mole/L/min. Find the rate of deformation of A
 
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Given the rate of formation of a product in a chemical reaction, find the rate of deformation of a reactant For 2A + B → C, C is formed at the rate of 1 mole/L/min. Find the rate of deformation of A
Views: 254 Chemisolutions
Isotopic labeling | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopic_labeling 00:01:50 1 Isotopic tracer 00:04:49 2 Stable isotope labeling 00:07:02 2.1 Metabolic flux analysis using stable isotope labeling 00:10:07 2.2 Isotope labeling measuring techniques 00:15:29 3 Radioisotopic labeling 00:16:48 4 Applications in proteomics 00:18:15 5 Applications for ecosystem process analysis 00:19:09 6 Applications for oceanography 00:19:46 6.1 Particle transport 00:20:41 6.2 Circulation 00:22:04 6.3 Tectonic processes and climate change 00:22:40 6.4 Isotopes related to nuclear weapons 00:23:46 7 Methods for isotopic labeling 00:24:07 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8898639805688009 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Isotopic labeling (or isotopic labelling) is a technique used to track the passage of an isotope (an atom with a detectable variation in neutron count) through a reaction, metabolic pathway, or cell. The reactant is 'labeled' by replacing specific atoms by their isotope. The reactant is then allowed to undergo the reaction. The position of the isotopes in the products is measured to determine the sequence the isotopic atom followed in the reaction or the cell's metabolic pathway. The nuclides used in isotopic labeling may be stable nuclides or radionuclides. In the latter case, the labeling is called radiolabeling. In isotopic labeling, there are multiple ways to detect the presence of labeling isotopes; through their mass, vibrational mode, or radioactive decay. Mass spectrometry detects the difference in an isotope's mass, while infrared spectroscopy detects the difference in the isotope's vibrational modes. Nuclear magnetic resonance detects atoms with different gyromagnetic ratios. The radioactive decay can be detected through an ionization chamber or autoradiographs of gels. An example of the use of isotopic labeling is the study of phenol (C6H5OH) in water by replacing common hydrogen (protium) with deuterium (deuterium labeling). Upon adding phenol to deuterated water (water containing D2O in addition to the usual H2O), the substitution of deuterium for the hydrogen is observed in phenol's hydroxyl group (resulting in C6H5OD), indicating that phenol readily undergoes hydrogen-exchange reactions with water. Only the hydroxyl group is affected, indicating that the other 5 hydrogen atoms do not participate in the exchange reactions.
Views: 24 Subhajit Sahu
Glucose | Wikipedia audio article
 
54:15
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Glucose 00:01:16 1 History 00:04:14 2 Chemical properties 00:05:16 2.1 Structure and nomenclature 00:06:33 2.2 Open-chain form 00:08:22 2.3 Cyclic forms 00:11:55 2.4 Rotational isomers 00:12:32 2.5 Mutarotation 00:13:56 2.6 Optical activity 00:15:33 2.7 Isomerisation 00:15:59 3 Biochemical properties 00:18:49 3.1 Uptake 00:22:50 3.2 Biosynthesis 00:24:33 3.3 Glucose Degradation 00:27:42 3.4 Energy source 00:33:58 3.5 Precursor 00:36:40 4 Pathology 00:36:49 4.1 Diabetes 00:38:55 4.2 Overweight and fatty liver 00:39:17 4.3 Hypoglycemia management 00:39:47 5 Sources 00:40:30 6 Commercial production 00:42:25 6.1 Conversion to fructose 00:43:06 7 Commercial usage 00:45:13 8 Analysis 00:45:40 8.1 Classical qualitative detection reactions 00:45:54 8.1.1 Fehling Test 00:46:28 8.1.2 Tollens Test 00:46:46 8.1.3 Barfoed test 00:47:13 8.1.4 Nylander's Test 00:47:26 8.1.5 Other tests 00:48:55 8.2 Instrumental Quantification 00:49:04 8.2.1 Refractometry and Polarimetry 00:49:31 8.2.2 Photometric enzymatic methods in solution 00:49:59 8.2.3 Photometric Test Strip Method 00:50:46 8.2.4 Amperometric glucose sensor 00:51:47 8.2.5 Other sensory methods 00:52:54 8.2.6 Copper iodometry 00:53:06 8.3 Chromatographic methods 00:53:46 8.3.1 In vivo analysis Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Glucose (also called dextrose) is a simple sugar with the molecular formula C6H12O6. Glucose is the most abundant monosaccharide, a subcategory of carbohydrates. Glucose is mainly made by plants and most algae during photosynthesis from water and carbon dioxide, using energy from sunlight. There it is used to make cellulose in cell walls, which is the most abundant carbohydrate. In energy metabolism, glucose is the most important source of energy in all organisms. Glucose for metabolism is partially stored as a polymer, in plants mainly as starch and amylopectin and in animals as glycogen. Glucose circulates in the blood of animals as blood sugar. The naturally occurring form of glucose is D-glucose, while L-glucose is produced synthetically in comparably small amounts and is of lesser importance. Glucose is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system. The name glucose derives through the French from the Greek γλυκός, which means "sweet," in reference to must, the sweet, first press of grapes in the making of wine. The suffix "-ose" is a chemical classifier, denoting a sugar.
Views: 24 wikipedia tts
Biochemicals | Wikipedia audio article
 
41:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:48 1 History 00:08:19 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:09:55 3 Biomolecules 00:10:52 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:16:31 3.2 Lipids 00:19:29 3.3 Proteins 00:28:59 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:31:20 4 Metabolism 00:31:30 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:32:04 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:33:21 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:35:55 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:37:21 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:40:34 6 See also 00:40:43 6.1 Lists 00:40:52 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7653534297727796 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Biochemicals | Wikipedia audio article
 
30:44
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:04 1 History 00:06:11 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:07:23 3 Biomolecules 00:08:07 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:12:17 3.2 Lipids 00:14:30 3.3 Proteins 00:21:30 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:23:16 4 Metabolism 00:23:25 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:23:52 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:24:50 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:26:45 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:27:50 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:30:14 6 See also 00:30:23 6.1 Lists 00:30:32 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Biochemical reaction | Wikipedia audio article
 
32:47
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:11 1 History 00:06:34 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:07:50 3 Biomolecules 00:08:37 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:13:06 3.2 Lipids 00:15:28 3.3 Proteins 00:23:00 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:24:52 4 Metabolism 00:25:02 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:25:31 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:26:32 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:28:34 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:29:42 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:32:17 6 See also 00:32:26 6.1 Lists 00:32:34 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9863718600504527 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Physiological chemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
34:31
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:20 1 History 00:06:56 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:08:17 3 Biomolecules 00:09:05 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:13:48 3.2 Lipids 00:16:18 3.3 Proteins 00:24:14 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:26:11 4 Metabolism 00:26:21 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:26:51 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:27:56 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:30:04 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:31:17 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:33:59 6 See also 00:34:09 6.1 Lists 00:34:17 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7845822741323002 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Biological Chemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
41:24
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:49 1 History 00:08:23 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:09:59 3 Biomolecules 00:10:56 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:16:38 3.2 Lipids 00:19:38 3.3 Proteins 00:29:13 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:31:35 4 Metabolism 00:31:44 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:32:19 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:33:37 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:36:12 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:37:38 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:40:52 6 See also 00:41:02 6.1 Lists 00:41:10 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7600610258168571 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Biochemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
30:44
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:04 1 History 00:06:11 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:07:23 3 Biomolecules 00:08:07 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:12:17 3.2 Lipids 00:14:30 3.3 Proteins 00:21:30 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:23:16 4 Metabolism 00:23:25 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:23:52 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:24:50 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:26:45 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:27:50 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:30:14 6 See also 00:30:23 6.1 Lists 00:30:32 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
Biochemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
30:40
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Biochemistry 00:02:04 1 History 00:06:11 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:07:22 3 Biomolecules 00:08:06 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:12:16 3.2 Lipids 00:14:29 3.3 Proteins 00:21:26 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:23:12 4 Metabolism 00:23:21 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:23:48 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:24:46 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:26:41 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:27:46 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:30:10 6 See also 00:30:19 6.1 Lists 00:30:27 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 8 wikipedia tts
Biochemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
31:18
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Biochemistry Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Biological chemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
38:06
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochemistry 00:02:35 1 History 00:07:42 2 Starting materials: the chemical elements of life 00:09:10 3 Biomolecules 00:10:03 3.1 Carbohydrates 00:15:17 3.2 Lipids 00:18:02 3.3 Proteins 00:26:50 3.4 Nucleic acids 00:29:01 4 Metabolism 00:29:10 4.1 Carbohydrates as energy source 00:29:42 4.1.1 Glycolysis (anaerobic) 00:30:54 4.1.2 Aerobic 00:33:16 4.1.3 Gluconeogenesis 00:34:35 5 Relationship to other "molecular-scale" biological sciences 00:37:35 6 See also 00:37:44 6.1 Lists 00:37:53 6.2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.808856790551112 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Biochemistry, sometimes called biological chemistry, is the study of chemical processes within and relating to living organisms. Biochemical processes give rise to the complexity of life. A sub-discipline of both biology and chemistry, biochemistry can be divided in three fields; molecular genetics, protein science and metabolism. Over the last decades of the 20th century, biochemistry has through these three disciplines become successful at explaining living processes. Almost all areas of the life sciences are being uncovered and developed by biochemical methodology and research. Biochemistry focuses on understanding how biological molecules give rise to the processes that occur within living cells and between cells, which in turn relates greatly to the study and understanding of tissues, organs, and organism structure and function.Biochemistry is closely related to molecular biology, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which genetic information encoded in DNA is able to result in the processes of life.Much of biochemistry deals with the structures, functions and interactions of biological macromolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids, which provide the structure of cells and perform many of the functions associated with life. The chemistry of the cell also depends on the reactions of smaller molecules and ions. These can be inorganic, for example water and metal ions, or organic, for example the amino acids, which are used to synthesize proteins. The mechanisms by which cells harness energy from their environment via chemical reactions are known as metabolism. The findings of biochemistry are applied primarily in medicine, nutrition, and agriculture. In medicine, biochemists investigate the causes and cures of diseases. In nutrition, they study how to maintain health wellness and study the effects of nutritional deficiencies. In agriculture, biochemists investigate soil and fertilizers, and try to discover ways to improve crop cultivation, crop storage and pest control.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts